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Dolhinov - HOME PAGE
Dolhinov / Dolginovo / Dauhinova Archival Information

1850 Dolhinov (Dolginovo), Vilna Guberniia

Jewish Community Revision Lists (Census)

pp. 261v-262

Entry # 219

Yankel (Jacob) son of Gabriel RUBIN Age 59 (i.e.,
born in 1791)

his wife Chaya daughter of Abraham Age
30 (i.e., born in 1820)

his sons:

1. Gabriel Age 12 in 1834
(missing since 1849)

2. Khatzkel Age 8 in 1834 (died in
1846)

3. Leiba Age 12 in 1850 (born
in 1838)

 

Entry # 220

Itzko (Isaac) son of Shimon AXELROD Age 34 in 1834
(born 1800) - died in 1835

Itko's wife Lea daughter of Yiekem Age 52 in
1850 (i.e., born 1798)

Itko's daughter Dvoiya? Age 18
in 1850 (i.e. born in 1832)

Itko's sons

1. Yokel Age 30 in 1850
(i.e., born 1820)

2. Yosel Age 24 in
1850 (i.e., born in 1826)

Yosel's wife Sora daughter of Rubin Age 23 in
1850 (i.e., born in 1827)

Yosel's daughter Dveira Age 1 in
1850 (i.e., born in 1849)

 

 

The Axelrod and Rubin families intermarried frequently.

1. Dveira daughter of Yosel AXELROD (listed here as age 1 later
married Yehoshua (Harris) RUBIN.

2. Abba son of Itztik (brother of the Dveira) married Dvora
daughter of Yaacov (Yankel) RUBIN.

 

Moreover, the fact that these RUBIN and AXELROD families are listed
next to each other in the 1850 census means that there is an excellent
chance that they were related.

KHAIA ZALTZMANOVITZ of Ramat Gan gave reports to Yad
Vashem for her mother, father, and her brothers and sisters ( there
were 8 including her, 4 perished in the shoah-).
Lenkin Chaja Resza (nee Rubin)

Chaja Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1888 to Shimon Chaim and Rivka
Rubin. She was a housewife and married to Yisrael Meir and had 8
children. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war
she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Chaja perished in 21/05/1942 ( third and
last liquidation) in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a
Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by her
daughter
KHAIA ZALTZMANOVITZ of Ramat Gan
o

Lenkin Israel Meir
Israel Meir Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1882 to Gershon and Chaia (
she, KHAIA ZALTZMANOVITZ of Ramat Gan, must be named after her
grandmother). He was a merchant and married to Chaia Resza nee Rubin.
Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war he was in
Dolhinow, Poland. Israel perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This
information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left)
submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by his daughter KHAIA ZALTZMANOVITZ of Ramat
Gan
Lenkin Hadassa
Hadassa nee Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1915 to Yisrael Meir and
Chaia Resza . She was a merchant and married to ? ( she wrote that she
does not remember his or the childrens names) and had 2 children.
Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in
Dolhinow, Poland. Hadassa perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This
information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left)
submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by her sister KHAIA ZALTZMANOVITZ of Ramat
Gan
Lenkin Gerszon
Gerszon Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1916 to Yisrael and Chaia
Resza. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in
Dolhinow, Poland. During the war he was in Dolhinow, Poland. Gerszon
perished in 1945 ( the war was over in the area in the
summer of 1944- GHershon returned to Dolhinov and was killed after he
demanded the home of his parents from the people who settled their
during the war) in Dolhinow, Poland at the age of 22. This
information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left)
submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by his sister
Lenkin Michal
Michal Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1909 to Yisrael and Chaia
Resza. He was a merchant and married to Zelda and had 2 children Yona
age 9 and a boy age 5 ( named not remembered). Prior to WWII he lived
in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war he was in Dolhinow, Poland. Michal
perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a
Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by his
sister
Lenkin Fejga
Fejga Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1907 to Yisrael and Chaia Resza
. She was married to ? and had 2 children. Prior to WWII she lived in
Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Fejga
perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a
Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 19-Feb-1956 by her
sister
From the list of perished Lenkin Israel Meir & family; Chaya Resha,
Michael & family, Gershon, Chaim Shimon & family, , Hadassah & family,
Feige & family
all together there are 3 Lenkin families of Dolhinov listed; there is
Israel Meir Lenkin & family which had reports by a cousin
there is another Lenkin family from Dolhinov; Nachum Lenkin, the only
survivor of his family, gave reports;

Lenkin Josef
Josef Meir Lenkin was born in Dolhinow in 1890 to Yaakov and
Nekhama. He was a merchant and married to Lea Disha (daughter of
Yaakov and Ida Sagalchik) and had 6 children (Yaakov, an accountant
born in 1915 perished as a P.O.W in Lublin., Shmuel, born in 1916,
Nachama, a school teacher born in 1920, Dov age 17 and Ida age 14, all
perished). Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war
he was in Dolhinow, Poland. Josef perished in 1942 in Dolhinow,
Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on
left) submitted on 04-Dec-1955 by his son
Nachum lenkin wrote in the Yizkor book - read;
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dolginovo/dol070.html
Lenkin Nachum Holon, Israel gave $250 to the Dolhinov Cemetery
Project.
Nachum passed away 4 years ago.

Message: This is a great site!

I am researching LAPIDES - any additional information would be appreciated.

Louis Lapides
birth: Riga, Latvia
died: abt 1936 Manhattan, NY, USA
wife: Sarah (no birth info, also died in Manhattan, NY)

One of Louis & Sarah's children is Samuel Lapides ...

Samuel Lapides
Born: 15 Jun 1885
Place: Dolhinov, Russia
Immigrated to USA: 1902
Married: 1 April 1907 in Manhattan, NY to Molly Hebenstreit
died: 7 Sep 1957
Place: Manhattan, NY, USA

Molly Hebenstreit
Born: 1 Jan 1885
Place: Belz, Austria
Died: Dec 1978
Place: Brooklyn, Kings, NY, USA

One of Samuel & Molly's children is Maurice Lapides ...

Maurice Lapides
born: 4 Jan 1917
Place: Manhattan, NY, USA
Died: 14 Dec 1977
Place: Queens, NY, USA

Thank you in advance for any additional information.
Janis (janis_3kids@charter.net)

From: Edward Cantor

 

Dear Eilat-
I am a cousin of Harold Kramer, who was in touch with you on an
earlier date. My mother was Sophie Kramer Cantor, her father was
Abraham Kramer, her grand father was Lazar Reuven Kramer and we think
that her great grandfather was Yosef Kramer, a Dolhinov rabbi. he
would have been born around 1820. Abraham came to America around
1890-1895.

I just returned from Israel where I spent a great deal of time with
Eytan Shamir, born in Israel , and the son of Shoshana (maiden name
Koton), nephew of Leo (Levi) Koton-who has some Printed material in
your web site, the grandson of Eliezar Koton and great grandson of
Nechama Kramer Koton, who was the daughter of Yosef Kramer.

your web site is wonderful. i have two questions: is there any
information on rabbi Yosef Kramer and are there any planned gatherings
in israel of descendants of dolhinov?

many thanks for all you have done....
-------------------------------
Dear Ed,
Thank you for writhing....
You asked about: Yosef Kramer, a Dolhinov rabbi born around 1820, who
was the father of Lazar Reuven Kramer
Checking the Dolhinov revision list for 1850, family 238 44 seem to
be your family, Srol son of Lazar/ Leizer must be your Yosef ( maybe
had 2 names) his son ( must be named for both of his
grandfathers;Lezer and Ruvin) ; Some details; Leizer who passed away
by 1844 had 2 sons; Srol ( born c 1820) and Zelik ( born c 1826) ,
Srol married Marka, the daughter of Ruvin, Their children by 1850:
Khaia, Seina, and Leizer ( born in 1844) Zelik child; Elka. More
detalis
SURNAME Given Name Father Relationship to Head of Household Age at
last revision Age
KREMER Srol son of Leizer Head of the household 14 30 6
November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Mirka daughter of Ruvin Wife 29 6 November 1850
Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Khaia Daughter of Srol 8 6 November 1850 Dolginovo
Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Seina Daughter of Srol 10 6 November 1850 Dolginovo
Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Leizer Son of Srol newborn 6 6 November 1850 Dolginovo
Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Zelik Brother Leizer 10 26 6 November 1850 Dolginovo
Vileika Vilnius 238 44
KREMER Zlata daughter of Nakhum Sister-in-law ( wife of Zelik) 24
6 November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 238 44
-KREMER Elka Niece daughter of Zelik 2 6 November 1850
Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 238 44
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
other Kremer families: Family 249 124( head of family Itsko, son
Shmuilo, grandsons Berko and Kalman)
KREMER GUTMAN Itsko son of Zaikin Head of the household Zaikin 49
died 1846 6 November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER GUTMAN Gita Daughter-in-law Shmuilo 43 wife of Movsha 6
November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER/ GUTMAN Berko Grandson Movsha 6 22 6 November 1850
Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER GUTMAN Elka Grand-daughter-in-law David 21 wife of
Berko 6 November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER GUTMAN Kalman Grandson Movsha was missing 26 6 November
1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER GUTMAN Khaia Grand-daughter-in-law Nakhman 19 6
November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
KREMER GUTMAN Mordukh Son Itsko 16 died 1842 6 November 1850
Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 249 124
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KREMER Ruvin son of GabrieL Head of the household l 1834 - 40 died
1848 6 November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 265 250
KREMER Movsha Brother Gabriel 1834 - 10 died 1843 6 November
1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 255 168
KREMER Gabriel son of Zelik Father k 1834 - 42 died 1843 6
November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika Vilnius 255 168
KREMER Roda Wife Meier 34 6 November 1850 Dolginovo Vileika
Vilnius 255 168
KREMER Tsirlia Daughter of Abram 3 6 November 1850 Dolginovo
Vileika Vilnius 255 168

check the list at;
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/dolginovo_1850_revision_list.htm
-Once a year (around June) the survivors and others of Dolhinov
ancestry meet in Israel. Ask Leon Rubin for information. "Leon Rubin"
<rubinlj@netvision.net.il>,
----------------------------------------------------
eilat-
thank you very much for the prompt response. certainly, you can ad the
information i provided to you. i am not sure if we have identified the
correct ancestor. i am not even sure that his name was yosef. we do
know
that his children included lazar reuven kramer (kremer), gabriel kramer
nechama kramer and elka pesha, elka pesha married a meier driesenstock
and
nechama married levitka (levi) koton. my guess is that they were all
born
between 1830 and 1850, if that gives you any more leads.thanks...ed
---------------------------------------------------------
From ancestry.com:
Name: Samuel Dreisenstock
Home in 1930: Schodack, Rensselaer, New York
Age: 52
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1878
Birthplace: Russia
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Anna
Race: White
Occupation:

Education:

Military service:

Rent/home value:

Age at first marriage:

Parents' birthplace: View Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members: Name Age
Samuel Dreisenstock 52
Anna Dreisenstock 49
Abraham Dreisenstock 21
Irasel Dreisenstock 18
Sam Dreisenstock]
Age in 1910: 33
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1877
Birthplace: Russia
Relation to Head of House: Head
Father's Birth Place: Russia
Mother's Birth Place: Russia
Spouse's Name: Conone
Home in 1910: Schodack, Rensselaer, New York
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Year of Immigration: 1904
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members: Name Age
Sam 33
Conone 29
Walliam 7
Abraham 19
Losie 32

My grandfather, Yirimayahu Yakov RUBIN (December
15, 1889-January 30, 1933) of Dolghinov was the son of
Haim Shimon RUBIN and Faiga Rivka HEIFETZ RUBIN. He
had a sister Chay Doba RUBIN PERLMUTTER (1906-1942)
who, with her entire family, was killed in 1942.
Yirimayahu Yakov emigrated to America in 1908. I am
trying to find the two brothers of Y.Y. but
unfortunately I do not know their first names.
I am told that one of them emigrated to
Birobidjan in the early 1930s. Does anyone have any
information on specific Jews in Birobidjan or children
of Haim Shimon and Faiga Rivka RUBIN. I have used all
JewishGen and Yad va-Shem materials to no avail.
It was announced in 2005 that there would be a
Jewish Research Center established there but it does
not seem to exist.

Barry Rubin,
profbarryrubin@yahoo.com
Tel Aviv.

Leon Rubin (rubinlj@netvision.net.il) on Tuesday, June 24, 2008 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Eilat,
As it was advertised, the Dolhinov annual Memorial Meeting "Askara" took place
in Tel-Aviv on the 17.06.08. More than 150 people attended this year special
event.
A documentary film devoted to Nikolay Kiselov was shown. Nikolay Kiselov was
the partisan commander who led us, the Dolhinov Ghetto survivors, over the
occupied territory and eventual crossing the frontier of the German-Russian
lines in November 1942. It was a long and very exousting, dangerous 2 month
march, and many people died in the German attacks on the way. The Memorial
meeting lasted over 3 hours. We had guests from abroad. It was a very moving,
and very successful event.
Leon Rubin,
rubinlj@netvision.net.il

From: Barry Rubin <profbarryrubin@yahoo.com>

I have been doing extensive research into the history of
Dolhinov's Jews and especially into that of the , and Hefetz families.
In cooperation with Harold Rhode and Leon Rubin, who has done so much
for the Dolhinov community, we are setting up a Dolhinov Research
Project and invite you to participate and to share your information.
This includes the following efforts:
--A survey of documents on Dolhinov in Vilna, Vileika, and
Minsk with the aim of copying as many as possible.
--Recording the inscriptions of the 400 gravestones in the
Jewish cemetery.
--Creating an email list of Dolhinov descendants to exchange
information. Please send me your email if you would like to be
included..
--Trying to build a Rubin and Grossbein family trees which will
obviously include a lot of other people as well.
--DNA testing of Rubin family members.
I hope that we can report to you on progress and to get your help.
Let me start with the DNA testing which is still going on.
Evidence from a few tests seems to indicate the following:
1. All Dolhinov Rubins come from a single family, taking that
name in the early 1700s.
2. The original location of the family was in eastern Anatolia
which coincides with the origins of Abraham's tribe in Ur.
We will know more as additional people are tested and more detailed
tests are done.

Please feel free to write me at profbarryrubin@yahoo.com.

Here is my family tree of Rubins as best as I can reconstruct it:

Yermiya Rubin born before 1743 (the first known Rubin)
\
Gabriel Rubin (1763- )
\
Yankel Rubin (1791-1833)
+Sora ? (1805- )
\
Zalman Rubin (1820s?-after 1870)
\
Yankel (1838-1889 or after) and Chaya Rubin (1837 or
1839-1889 or after) (daughter of Itzko ____). They had three sons:

1.Leib (March 15, 1865-January 10, 1949)
Married Sarah ((November 25, 1872-November 9, 1944)
A. Philip 1890
B. David 1895
C. Bessie 1897
D. Anna 1899
E. Alexander 1901
F. Ida 1903
G. Evelyn 1909

2. Haim Shimon (1867- 1920 or after?)
Ma: Faiga Rivka Heifetz (daughter of Tankhel Heifetz; sister of Natan
Heifetz). They had two children:

A. Yaakov Yeramiyahu (1890-1933)
Ma. Chaya Grossbein
David (1913-1974) married Helene: Barry Rubin
Lillian: (1921- ) married Melvin Kramer: Joan, Richard, Susan,

B.
C. Chaya Doba (1906-1942)
Ma: Aharon Perlmutter
Haim
Yaakov

C and D: there were two other sons but I cannot find their names. I
would be grateful for help here.

3.. Zalman-Ber Rubin (1860-?), drafted into the Czarist army in 1879,
fate unknown.

Amir Dekel (adekel@bellsouth.net) on Saturday, August 23, 2008

Home Page: http://dream-of-genea.blogspot.com

I came across your wonderful site while doing a google search for my ancestors.
My grandmother, Zipora Smorgonski was from Dolhinov as were her sisters Hanna
and Pesia and her half brother Shlomo (Shamgar). From what I can figure out the
rest of the family died in the Dolhinov ghetto*. I pieced most of it together
from the Yizkor Books, Yad Vashem site and family stories.

While looking through your site I think I spotted my grandmother in the two
'Hachalutz' pictures. I know she was a member of 'Hachalutz' and later went to
Kibbutz Lida and then to Israel.

Any other information would be terrific.

Thanks for the great site!
Amir Dekel

-------------------------------
Amir,
Your grandmother' half brother: Shlomo Shamgar ( nee Smorgonski), a survivor
gave reports:
Smorgonski Chaia

Chaia Smorgonski was born in Dolhinov in 1925 to Avraham and Henia nee Sigalchik. She was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinov, Poland. Chaia perished in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland at the age of 17. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 20-Jul-1999 by her brother, a Shoah survivor

Smorgonski Henia

Henia Smorgonski nee Segalchik was born in Dolhinov in 1892 to Yaakov and Ita. She was a housewife and married to Avraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinov, Poland. Henia perished in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland at the age of 50. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted by her son, a Shoah survivor
Smorgonski Yosef

Yosef Smorgonski was born in Dolhinov in 1928 to Avraham and Henia nee Sigalchik. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinov, Poland. Yosef perished in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland at the age of 14. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 20-Jul-1999 by his brother, a Shoah survivor.



Smorgonski Abraham

Abraham Smorgonski was born in Poland in 1880. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war he was in Dolhinow, Poland. Abraham perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Nov-1957 by his daughter
Smorgonski Esther

Esther Smorgonski was born in Poland in 1879 to Yaakov and Ita. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Esther perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Jan-1957 by her daughter

Smorgonski Yta

Yta Smorgonski was born in Poland in 1920 to Avraham. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Yta perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Jan-1957 by her sister
Lenkin Leduscha

Leduscha Lenkin nee Sigalchik was born in Dolhinow to Yaakov and Ita. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Leduscha perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Jan-1957 by her cousin. More Details...
Lenkin Ita

Ita Lenkin was born in Poland to Yosef and Lidia. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. Ita perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Jan-1957 by her cousin. More Details...

Smargonski Chaia

Chaia Smargonski was born in Poland to Avraham. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinov, Poland. Chaia perished in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 22-Jan-1957 by her sister

*Some others from the family survived and gave Yad Vashem repots.
Levi Kotton
Kotton Mina

Mina Kotton nee Smorgonski was born in Dolhinow in 1887 to Shmariahu and Frida. She was a owner of a shoe factory and married to Eliezer. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war she was in Dolhinow, Poland. Mina perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland at the age of 45. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-May-1999 by her son, a Shoah survivor

 

Liba Chaia Sagalchik nee Smorgonski was born in Dolhinow in 1885 to Shmariahu and Frida. She was a housewife and married to Yosef. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. She perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland at the age of 57. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-Jul-1999 by her nephew, a Shoah survivor

 


Tebel Yonah Ginsburg nee Smorgonski was born in Dolhinov in 1892 to Shmariahu and Frida. She was married to Yehuda. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinov, Poland. She perished in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland at the age of 50. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-Jul-1999 by her nephew, a Shoah survivor.

 


Fridman Dvora

Dvora Fridman nee Smorgonski was born in Dolhinow in 1889 to Shmariahu and Frida. She was married to Shmuel. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. Dvora perished in 1942 in Dolhinow, Ghetto at the age of 53. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-Jul-1999 by her nephew, a Shoah survivor. More Details...

Smorgonski Yermiyahu

Yermiyahu Smorgonski was born in Dolhinow in 1894 to Shmariahu and Frida. He was a merchant. Prior to WWII he lived in Butrimonys, Lithuania. Yermiyahu perished in 1942 in Butrimonys, Lithuania at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-Jul-1999 by his nephew, a Shoah survivor. More Details...

 

Fridman
Yosef Fridman was born in Dolhinov in 1923 to Shmuel and Dvora Fridman nee Smorgonski . Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinov, Poland. Yosef perished in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland at the age of 19. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01-Jul-1999 by his cousin, a Shoah survivor

Kiselov's List, The film on Dolhinov during the holocaust
A message from Leon Rubin:
The producer of the documentary full length film on Dolhinov,
"Kiselov's List," wrote me that his film has won the first prize in
International film festivals in Russia including the first prize and
Grand-Pris of the 12th International film festivallast Friday. A lot
was written about the film in the Russian press.

He is participating in the International Film Festival of 24 countries
in Ashkelon (The 2008 5th JEWISH EYE festival , OCTOBER 22-30/ 2008,
80 FILMS FROM 24 COUNTRIES IN A BIG JEWISH CULTURE CELEBRATION will
last nine days, during which 80 Jewish films from 24 different
countries will be screened in the frame of a prize-bearing
competition. The films are divided into three categories: full-length
feature films; full-length documentaries; and short dramas and
documentaries) He is arriving in Israel on the 22nd of October and
will bring me copies of the film for distribution. So please inform
the people on your email list that anyone who is interested in buying
a copy of the film should send a payment of $100 either by cheque
(plus postage fee of $5) or through Western Union to my home address:

Leon Rubin,
2 Hartsit Str.
Ramat Efal,
Ramat Gan 52960 Israel

Email address is: rubinlj@netvision.net.il Upon receipt of payment a
copy of the film will

 

From Barry Rubin: I will just add that this is a superb film, very
well made and very emotionally affecting. Anyone who has connections
to television stations that might buy the film for broadcast can
contact Leon.

Professor Barry Rubin

Director, Global Research in International Affairs (GLORIA) Center
http://www.gloriacenter.org
Editor, Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA) Journal
http://www.meriajournal.com
Watch on the Middle East http://www.watchonthemiddleeast.com
Editor Turkish Studies,
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t713636933%22

Dee Axelrod (deeaxelrod@gmail.com)

Subject: Comment

Landsman,

Dee Axelrod, here. My grandfather, Benjamin Axelrod and his brother, Samuel,

left Dolhinov in 1914. They settled in Salem, MA.

I teach Hebrew School. We're currently on the Holocaust. That makes me think
about personal history. Once again, I thought of Dolhinov, feeling sad, as I

have so many times, that I couldn't go back and see the place my ancestors came
from. Ii can't tell you how wonderful it is to find this site.

Thank you so very much.

Zelig Farberman was the Husband of Bertha
and the Father of ;
1. Velvel Farberman wife; Zisha Libba Farberman Mother of Max, Ethel
(wife of Max Louis Gordon/ Podbereski of Vishnevo mother of Jerome,
Bessie Edith Bloom, Irene Karch and Abraham), Abraham( Husband of
Cheyna
Father of Bessie, Dora Rubin , Velvel, Ida Gruppe and Lillian Weiss ),
Chaya Dorin (Wife of Isadore
Mother of Pauline Epstein , William and Ida), Fannie Goldstein ( wife of Harry
Mother of Zisha, Velvel and Zelig) and Katie Gordon /Podberesky Wife
of Philip Gordon /Podberesky of Vishnevo
Mother of Beatrice Cherry and Lillian Karn
2. Leo, Husband of Mari nee Aruch ( perished in Ilja) and Father of
Gertrude Kudrow Wife of David
(Mother of Lee and Gershon , grandmother of actress Lisa Kudrow), Anna
Meister and Sadie Mandell
3. Ida Ruderman wife of Joe,
4. Chiveya Berman Wife of Henick Mother of Rebecca Rubin (Wife of Abe
Mother of Yudel, Lillian and Velvel) , Abraham, Yetta and Chaim
(Husband of Esther
Father of Ina, Jacob, David and Munik),
5. Rose Halpern Wife of David Mother of Harold and Julius
6. Abraham Husband of Celia
Brother of Avrum Farberman Husband of Rebecca
Father of
1. Sophie Cadesky Wife of Louis Mother of Reva Zinberg, Shirley
Yarmus and Murray Kadis Husband of Shirley
Father of David, Pearly and Barr
2. Samuel
From: barry rubin <profbarryrubin@yahoo.com>
A Rubin Mystery/A Grosbein Mystery
1. A Rubin Mystery
Yesterday I received a wonderful surprise from my cousin, Susan Baram.
And there’s a lesson in this for all of us: never give up.
Susan discovered that her mother had—and had always had—a touched up
photograph taken in about 1905 of four Dolhinov Rubins:
--My and Susan’s great-grandmother, Faiga Rivka Rubin, born Hefetz,
daughter of David and sister of Natan Hefetz , to whom some of you are
related. She was born somewhere between 1865 and 1871. I had never
seen her before and that was a big thrill. She was married to Haim
Shimon Rubin, son of Yankel. She was still alive in 1933 but is not
listed in Yad ve-Shem as having died in the Shoah. I didn’t find her
grave in the cemetery but I’m sure she spent her whole live in
Dolhinov.
--My and Susan’s grandfather, Yakov Yeramayahu Rubin, born in 1890,
emigrated to America in 1910.
--And two little boys, sons of Faiga, brothers of Yakov.
And on this last point is the mystery.
I feel confident that their names were not Haim, Shimon, Yakov,
Yeramayahu, or David. But what were they? Perhaps they were ancestors
of yours?
So do you have any candidates? Males named Rubin, born between around
1902 and 1909, father Haim, mother Faiga?
2. Grosbein mystery
Pinkus Leib Grosbein, my great-grandfather, married Simka (Sima)
Mendel (born 1861) daughter of Boruch Mendel. They had a son Hershel
born in 1880 and another son named Yitzhak born in 1884, the first in
Dolhinov, the second in Rechki. The boys seem to disappear after a few
years. Any knowledge of a Hershel or Yitzhak Grosbein? Again, neither
is listed in Yad ve-Shem.
Other things:
My researcher has just returned from Moscow without
any great luck. There are Russian military archives and if you can
prove you are related you might be able to get the military record of
an ancestor. But about Dolhinov itself so far no success there. I also
have researchers working in Vilna and Minsk, and will report any new
information.

#gro-12:

GROSBEIN FAMILIES IN DOLHINOV 1850 A SNAPSHOT

      There were by 1850, only 16 Grosbeins living in Dolhinov (including spouses) from four Grosbein family groups.

 1:      The line of Yehuda: SHMUEL GROSBEIN’S HOUSE, November 6, 1850

Shmuel ben Yehuda (1789-1835) married Sara (Sora) (1793). His father was Yehuda ben ? Grosbein. Shmuel was out of town in 1833 and back in 1834. They had three children Berko (1821-after 1858), Sosia (1824) not in Dolhinov in 1850, and Elia, ( late 1834-after1850. Berko married Basia bat Ansel (1825-after 1850). They had a son Shmuel (named after his grandfather) (1841-still living in 1858). In 1850, Berko, Basia, Shmuel, and Elia are living together in the same house. [1850 revision: 519-523]

2.      line of Yitzhak: In 1850, Shmuel & Yehuda, brothers, living in Shmuel’s house

Yitzhak ben _____ (1730 or before-?) who had brothers named Avigdor (Ovsei) and Eliezer (Leizer)? And Leizer might have had a son Mikhel.

                 Son 1?:  Kadus-David ben Yitzhak (Itska) (1766-1812). No clear descendants.

               Son 2:Shmuel-Leib ben Yitzhak (1781-1846). Married Menka (1782-before 1834?). Remarried Mriase (1803-before 1850).Out of town for a while around 1835. Their son was David ben Shmuel (1800-1847) who married Kreina (1800-before 1850). They had a daughter Braina (1821) and a son Berko (1828-after 1858) who married Beila bat Rafal (1828-after 1850). David took over Shmuel’s house’s house when his father died. Braina is not in Dolhinov in 1850. Mikhel ben Eliezer (1808-1842) lived in the same house, before or with them. [see 1850, 368-372].

              Son 3: Yehuda ben Yitzhak (1782-1841) married Bela (1789-before 1850). Out of Dolhinov between 1811 and 1815. They had a son Shaul (Shevel) (1817-1835) who married Sara (1816). Yehuda and Bela also had twins, Esther and Shoshie, born in 1830. Neither is in Dolhinov in 1850 (See 1850 revision, 414-15)

             Shmuel and Yehuda are somehow related to Mikhel ben Leizer (1807-1842), absent in 1818 but back by 1827, and Leib ben Ovsei (1778-1831). Ovsei was probably brother of the Yitzhak father and Mikhel a son of one of Yitzhak’s brothers. No descendants listed in 1850.

    

   3.      The line of Menahem: SHLOMO GROSBEIN’S HOUSE, November 6, 1850

                 Menahem must have been born before 1742. Leib (Gershon Leib) ben Menahem (1761-1825) had two sonsYitzhak (1818-still living in 1858) and Shlomo (1816-still living in 1858). THIS SEEMS UNLIKELY menahem would be too old to have these sons.

?--Shmerel ben Leib (1781) arrived in Dolhinovaround December 1811, “with the beggars.” Whatever this means precisely it indicates he was not born in Dolhinov. He has no descendents in later records.

?--Another possible son would be Yisrael ben Gershon (1791-1845), left Dolhinov before 1811 but was back by that year. He married Hava (1790-before 1834). Their daughters Hanna (Khasha?) (1808) (not living in Dolhinov in 1850) and Sara (1818) not living in Dolhinov in 1850, and their sons Girshon (1804-1846) and Yakov (1818-still alive in 1858) married to Yenta bat Abram (1820) [1850 Revision: 851-854]

--Shlomo (1816-after 1858) married Shulka bat Shlomo (Shlioma) (1820-after 1850) and had at least one child, Haya (1847-after 1850).

--Yitzhak (1818-still living in 1858) married Feiga bat Yakov (Iankel) (1820-after 1850) and they lived in his brother’s household. Yitzhak had at least two children by 1850: Chaya (1844-after 1850), Khana (1841-after 1850.) These seven people lived together in the largest Grosbein household in Dolhinov. [1850 Revision: 527-533].  

                       In 1857, Yitzhak had a son Pinkus Leib Grosbein who was my great-grandfather. Itzko Grosbein died prior to 1884. Pinchus Leib married, probably in 1878 or 1879, Simka (Sima) Mendel (born 1861) daughter of Boruch Mendel. They had a son Hershel born in 1880. In 1881 they moved from Dolginov to the village of Rechki of Vileisky uyezd. They obtained a permit to do so from the chief policeman of the uyezd on May 6, 1881. His second son, Itzko (Yitzhak, named after his father) was born in 1884 and Sima died in childbirth aged only 23. He then, at age 27, moved back to Dolginov with his two sons, no doubt wanting both the company of his family and help in raising the two boys. He received his permit to do so on February 1, 1885.

Back in Dolginov he quickly married Lea Rivka, who was probably very young. No doubt, a widow with two little children needed a wife fast. By 1889 they were living in a wooden one-story house with five people. These were probably Hershel, Yitzhak—sons of his first marriage-- wife Lea Rivka and Shmuel. (1886-1942). And then they had three other children—Sarah (1887-1962 or 1963?), Chaya (1892-1970), and Rahel (1894-1942). Chaya could have been named after her aunt.

NO MEMBERS IN DOLHINOV IN 1850

           The line of Haim LEFT DOLHINOV? Haim would have been born prior to 1766

           (Beines-Itsko) Yitzhak ben Haim 1784. In 1816 he was married to Mariasha (1781) and they had a daughter Khasha (1809). Mariasha seems to have died and he married Liba (1799) and with her probably had Moishe (1821), Yitzhak (1823), and Rivka 1827. The family is absent from 1846. Ovsei ben Yitzhak (1817), he left in 1846, may have been a son of Yitzhak ben Haim but he is not listed as such and lived with the Faibish ben Shlomo family (see below).

  

The line of Shlomo:

Shlomo ben ? Grosbein was born prior to 1772

Son : Faibish ben Shlomo (Shlioma) (1791-1840). Could be brother of Shulka ben Shlioma (assuming she was a Grosbein). Married to Basia (1792-before 1850).  They were out of Dolhinov before 1818. They had two sons, Shlomo (1828) who left in 1845 and Zalman (1824) who left in 1846.  He may have had more children. Ovsei ben Yitzhak (1817) lived with this family until he left in 1846. Was he a son of Yitzhak ben-Haim? [see 1850, 46-49]

Leib Grosbein (on or before 1798-before 1850) had at least two sons: Isaac (born 1818) and Shlomo (born 1816). Issac may have been a widower in or after 1844 and lived in his brother’s household. Isaac had at least three children by his first marriage: Chaya (born 1844), Khana (born 1841) and Ovsei (born 1832). For some reason, Ovsei left Dolhinov in 1846. Shlomo (born 1816) married Shulka (born 1820) and had at least one child, Chaya (born 1847).

Grossbein families at the time of the Shoah

1. Pinchas Leib Grosbein descendents

            Two children: Chaya and Sarah emigrated to the United States in 1908.

Shmuel (1886-1942) married Rahel Lea Markman (1892-1942) and owned a market stall. They had four children. The whole family was killed in the Shoah. The children were Leah Rivka (!924-1942)(named after his mother) Pinkas Leib (1928-1942) (named after his father);Ethel (?-1942), and Moshe (1922-1942) (named after Rahel’s parents).

Rahel (1892-1942) married Yirimayahu Dimenshtein (1890-1942) They had three children: Mendel (who died young in 1923), Moshe (1922-1942), and Teibel (Tova) (born 1924), who escaped into the forest, was sent to Siberia, returned to Dolghinov after the war, and emigrated to Israel in 1957. Rahel, Yirimayahu, and Moshe were killed in 1942.  Tova married Shmuel Alperovitz from Dolghinov, who was together with her on the forest march, and they had two daughters who live in Israel, Malka and Raya who each had one son and one daughter.

Hershel Grosbein: 1880-?

Yitzhak Grosbein:  1884-?

---2. Chatzkel Grosbein family

Chatzkel (Yeheskel?) Grossbein, born around 1864, was a blacksmith in 1920 and died before 1930. (wife unknown name)  They had three sons who he brought into his business and who died in the Shoah: Zalman (1890-1942); Mendel, 1902-1942, who married Ryva Grossbein, daughter of Leyzer Grossbein.  and Boris (1903-1942). Check Zalman brother in law

Chaim Grosbein (b before 1876-d prior to 1928) had a son Zalman Shlomo Grosbein (1894-1942) who married Sonya (Sheyna, daughter of Moshe and Bela Katzovitz) 1905-1942. He was a wagon wheel maker. They had two sons Haim 1935-1942 and Ido (Yitzhak) 1937-1942 and three daughters Batya (Berta, 1926-1942), Ryva 1932-1942, and Ida 1934-1942, Testimony (01-Jan-1956 by Sonya’s sister, Henya Zukernik Katzovitz, and Zalman’s sister in law. The entire family was killed

Mendel and Ryva (bat Lazar Grosbein (1904-1942) had Haya (Khaya), 1922-1942; Frida, 1926-1942; Dora, 1928-1942, and Khatzkel-1930-1942.

Boris married Perka (1905-1942) had a daughter Ryva, 1932-1942  and a son Yefim 1934-1942 and a son Yitzhak1936-1942. The whole family was killed in the Shoah.  

------- 3. Mendel Grosbein family

Shmuel Grosbein (born before 1869) had a son named Mendel Grosbein (born before 1887) who married Bela and had a two sons, Yitzhak and Hershel 1905-1942.

Hershel married Chaya  Hefetz 1907-1942 (parents Shmuel and Chana Hefetz). They had Shmuel 1933-1942 and Haim 1937-

Yitzhak married Lea Hefetz and had Shmuel, Rishka, Hanna, Razel, and Pinia (see below)

-------4. Yerimayahu-Hana Grosbein family

Yerimayahu Grosbein (born pre-1856) married Hana. They had a son Yisrael Grosbein (1874-1942) and Yitzhak (1892-1942) COUSIN TESTIMONY 11/5/55.

Yisrael Grosbein married Pesia (daughter of Meir and Feiga Geskin) (1894-1942) their daughter Masha Deutsch survived.

Yitzhak Grosbein was a tailor and married to Tziporah (bat Lev) 1872-1942. Their children were Chana 1923-1942; Yenta (1913-1942) a teacher;  and Dvosia 1910-1942 who married a man named Kraut, and moved to Glebokie where she died. Testimony 5-Sep-1955.   testimony 5-Sep-1955 by her sister Masha Deutsch

--5. Yitzhak-Liza Grosbein family

Yitzhak Grosbein (1900-1942) married Liza (1904-1942)and they had Chana 1930-1942; Basya 1932-1942. Pinya ?-1942. I believe they also had a son named Shmuel 1938?-942.

Other  SHMUEL GROSBEIN FAMILIES

Shmuel Grosbein2 1895-1942 married Genya (Bat Leib), a tailor, (1900-1942). They had a daughter Ema (1918-1942) a tailor, and two sons Pinya 1920-1942 and Moshe (1922-1942).  

A different Shmuel Grosbein3 had a daughter Liza (1902-1942) married to ?

Tzvi Grosbein was married to Chaya (1899-1942, bat Shmuel and Khana). They had a son named Haim (1933-1942).

FRAGMENTARY RELATIONS

Lazar Grosbein (born before 1864 ) had a daughter Pesya 1882-1942.

Lester Slonin, Kurenets, Dolhinov

Lester Slonin's family originated in Dolhinov and Kurenets

Louis M. Howard of Boise, Idaho died at age 95 on July 10, 2010. Louis was born in Jersey City, New Jersey on May 28, 1915, the eldest child of Frank Horowitz of Dolginovo, Belarus and Beatrice Tobias of Novyy Swerzhen, Belarus. Louis, a graduate of DeWitt Clinton High School, lived his first forty years in New York City. An enthusiastic and adventurous world traveler, Louis lived in Mexico City in 1959-1960. As Louis recounted to his family, he thought it best not to marry, "why make one woman miserable, when I can make many women very happy?" Louis served in the US Army from 1942-1948 as a member of the Signal Corps, much of the time assigned to duty on a tug boat in New York Harbor. He was proud of his service as a civilian employee of the Air Force working in aircraft parts acquisition from 1963 to 1976. In the course of his work he lived in Rome, NY and then in Ogden, Utah. Instead of retiring, Lou then began a new career as a commercial real estate appraiser in Ogden. Always generous with his time, Louis served 15 years on the Ogden City Planning Commission and was President for seven years of Brith Sholom Synagogue in Ogden. Louis, along with his father Frank Horowitz, who moved to Ogden to live with Louis after Louis' mother died, were the spirit that kept the small Brith Sholom in existence, always welcoming new members. Making new friends in each community where he lived, Louis had an avid appreciation of art, always becoming a member of the local art museums. He loved music and was also an enthusiastic ballroom dancer who delighted in taking his friends to his favorite dance spots. For his 90th birthday, friends and family gathered to celebrate and to enjoy music by a band carefully selected by Louis. His 95th birthday was quieter, but he was on his feet dancing then as well. Louis was a photographer from an early age and while stationed in Hawaii with the US Army, won a National Geographic prize for his photographic portrait of an elderly Hawaiian man. Louis will be missed by his family, friends and his many dance partners. He is survived by his five nieces and their families, Susan Goldsmith and husband, Joseph Waxman of Piedmont, CA, Judy Lynn of Denver, CO, Patti Roberts and husband, Mike of Castle Rock, CO, Deirdre Arnowitz and husband, Stuart of Richmond, VA and Vicki Kelemen and husband, Dave of Mission Santa Fe, CA. His great-nieces and nephews are Jonah Waxman and Sandra Reid, Rosalie Waxman, Josh and Kasey Timon, Mckenzie and Cullen Lyle, Paul and Haley Longstreath, Tom Longstreath, and Rebecca and Jennifer Arnowitz. His great-great-nieces and nephews are Grayson and Finley Timon, Sesto and Maya Lyle, and Samantha Longstreath. Lou was predeceased by his beloved brother, Marvin Horowitz, who died in 1944 and is survived by a sister, R. Diane Goldsmith of Walnut Creek, CA. Lou's surviving cousins include Leo Tobias of New York and Rosalie Shadovitz of CA. He is also survived by his aunt, Ethel Paltrowitz of New Jersey. Lou's family appreciates the care he received from his longtime physician, Dr. David Hindson of the Boise VA Hospital and the more recent care provided by Willow Park and Boise Rehabilitation. Louis will be buried at Aultorest Cemetery in Ogden, Utah where graveside services will be held on Monday, July 12, 2010. Contributions to a charity of your choice are deeply appreciated. Local arrangements under the direction of Relyea Funeral Chapel. www.relyeafuneralchapel.com

Read more: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/idahostatesman/obituary.aspx?n=louis-howard&pid=143986591&fhid=6470#ixzz1H0PzjXCf

my name is Yael Yulia, my grandmother is Rozalia Rapson born in 1935
in Belarus. her father's name was Girsh Rapson (born 1900 , died 1950)
he was the son of Michael Rapson from Vilnius (Poland at those days)
and the step brother of Vigdor Rapson, my grandmother was told all her
life that most of her father's (Girsh's) family (his mother and
sisters) left in the 1930's to the States. he stayed in Belarus,
fought WW2 and his family ( wife - Ester Genia Chernov and kids
Rozalia and Michael) survived the war and started their families.
currently we are living in Israel.
i saw in your family tree that the names and places are the same and
even the dates are a match. Michael Rapson Vigdor's son has found us
through Yad Va'Shen records in the 90's (he is my grandmother's
cousine) but we didn't stay in touch.
please let me know if you need me to send more details, i have a
picture of Girsh that i can scan.
hope to hear from you
Yael Podmazo

From: Leon Rubin <rubinlj@netvision.net.il>
Date: Fri, 18 May 2012 11:40:03 +0300
Subject: Fascinating walking tour of central Tel-Aviv (ALL proceeds go
to the Dolhinov Forest Fund).

 

Architect Dan Price, lecturer at Tel Aviv University and co-author
with Ada Karmi-Melamede of the book "Architecture in Palestine during
the British Mandate 1917-1948," will be conducting a unique and
fascinating walking tour of central Tel Aviv. This is not a
historical tour, but a look at what and why the work done here during
the British Mandate is so important and the neighborhood has been
declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Learn about the original design
of the city, the development of the architecture, the use of light and
materials and much more. The tour will be conducted in English.
Date: Saturday, May 26
Time: 10-13:00
Duration: Three hours with a break at a café on Rothschild Blvd.
(wear comfortable shoes, hat and bring water)
Meeting point: King Albert Sq., Cnr. of Nahmani St. and Melchett
St. (There is a charming café on the square for those who want to get
breakfast before the walk)

Price: NIS 100 per person ( ALL proceeds go to the Dolhinov Forest
Fund - for more details of the project see below.) Registration
essential. Phone or sms Elana on 050-5558156

The Dolhinov Forest Fund is a project of descendents of Jews from
Dolhinov,Byelorussia (formerly Poland). The forest will have 5000
trees, one tree in memory of each member of the Jewish community who
perished at the hands of the Nazis. The aim is to create a place that
is both a living memorial and an appropriate contribution to the
natural environment of the State of Israel.

From: Ron Deutsch <RDeutsch@cgd-law.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:51:03 -0400
Subject: RE: Kisselev
To: Leon Rubin <rubinlj@netvision.net.il>,
"Eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com" <Eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com>, barry
rubin <profbarryrubin@yahoo.com>

Wish I knew he was inducted. I orignially wrote Barry, Eliat and you
several years back about nominating him. Even came up with documented
testimonials on his behalf. The last I was contacted I was told that
his son was found in Russia and then I heard nothing further. I would
have flown in for the ceremony.

Subject: Kisselev

The film 'Kiselov's List" was created by Moscow film producer Y. Kaller
with my close cooperation in providing all basic assistance from Israel.
As you know, I was in the group led by Nikolay Kiselov
and took part in the unique march over the occupied territory to safety.
Kiselov was inducted in Yad va Shem as Righteous Gentile by all our
mutual efforts.
It happened in 2008.

...I assume you are interested to know what is the status of the
Memorial Project "Dolhinov Jews Forest" in Israel.
We are still short of the amount of money the JNF(KKL) of Israel
requests for executing the Project.
As you are probably well aware of, the task of collecting donations is
a very hard and difficult job.

So far we have collected about 50% of the needed sum and are
continuing our efforts to reach the required amount.
If you can assist in the further promotion of the Project, it would be
very helpful and greatly appreciated.
If for this purpose you might need the original Letter of Appeal for
support and donations,
please let me know and I will resend it to you.

With my best wishes,
Leon

Dolginovo

1886 clipping from Hamelitz (in Hebrew) which refers to the porgom in Dolginovo. The article is about something else, someplace else, but it sets the date according to "the thunder in Dolgonov" which I assume to be the pogrom.

Israel Pikholz.

I participated in this year's Litvak Trip organized by Howard Margol and
Peggy Freedman (which I highly recommend), and would like to share my comments
and photos of the following Belarus shtetls that I had the opportunity to visit:
Dolginovo (Dalhinev), Dokshitsy & Volozhin.

Please visit my blog below and scroll through the July 2012 Archives for the
following:

1. Blog entries titled "Belarus, It's Complicated" (in three parts), including
some photos

2. Three earlier entries with all of my photos for each shtetl. Please note that
the most photos are for Dolginovo, including many photos of legible grave markers
from the cemetery, the synagogue, and some shtetl houses.

http://socallitvak.wordpress.com/

If anyone has additional photos of Dolginovo e.g. marketplace area and houses,
I would be interested in seeing them.

Best regards,
Sandy Ruderman Hack
Valencia, CA

Leon Rubin <rubinlj@netvision.net.il>
Date: Tue, Feb 12, 2013 at 4:13 AM
Subject: FW: column
To: "\"Leon Rubin\"" <rubinlj@netvision.net.il>

Dear Friends,

This is to inform you that professor Barry Rubin has completed and just published his book on Dolhinov called "Children of Dolhinov".
"Children of Dolhinov" is available free on line at the following Internet link:
http://www.gloria-center.org/pt_free_books/children-of-dolhinov-our-ancestors-and-ourselves/.
The Book gives a thorough account of the history of Dolhinov and the destiny of its Jewish community.
I hope all will appreciate professor Rubin's undertaking and be thankful for his great effort.

With my best regards,
Leon Rubin





From: barry rubin [mailto:profbarryrubin@yahoo.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2013 9:54 PM
To: oped@jpost.com
Subject: column


By Barry Rubin

Having just published a book, Children of Dolhinov, on my paternal grandparent’s town, Dolhinov, Poland (now Belarus), I want to share with you some of the things that brought about that project and the ways it changed me. (See at the end how to access the full text on-line for free.)

When I was about ten years old or so, a half-century ago, our class was given one of those exercises, typical even in those days, of making a presentation about our genealogical “roots.” It made a deep impression on me and was one of the two things motivating a multi-year effort to find out about my own “pre-history.”

At the time, I only began with two words: Poland and 1908 (the year of my grandparents’ arrival in America. That was it. My parents gave me no names of people or places and I had literally no relatives. But, my parents said, we hadn’t lost anyone in the Holocaust from our family. From what I’ve heard, that isn’t an atypical pattern among American Jews.

A second experience that ultimately led to this effort happened in the Paris flea market in 1963, a trip that was my bar mitzvah present. At one of the stalls, a woman who saw me gasped and started crying. She explained that I looked just like the son she had lost twenty years earlier. She held up an old photograph. She was right.

Being a historian, I decided years later, it was ridiculous for me not to have researched my own history. And given the massive amount of help available on Internet now—especially Jewishgen and Ancestory.com—doing what was unimaginable a short time ago is now achievable.

And so unrolled the story of Dolhinov. I want to stress that this isn’t just a book about the Holocaust—which takes up a relatively small albeit emotionally intense part of the book—but the far longer and more complex history of Jews in eastern Europe. But it is also two other things: an attempt to explain to people while knowing how people and events before they were born formed them, and how a small town interrelated with far grander events and trends in world history.

It is hard to convey the people, stories, and happenings that populate this book. I had the thrill of meeting remarkable people, the unequalled experience of being “reunited” with distant relatives after a century, the insights into my own character and life as being shaped by individuals I never heard of and events I never knew about.

Such a project is also something of an adventure and a detective story, which has taken me to six countries including to Dolhinov itself, where I had the moving experience of cleaning the tombstone of my great-grandfather.

Many of the things I experienced I had already “known” about from books. But such knowledge is shallow compared to learning and seeing on a personal basis. One thing I learned of was the tremendous love and mental involvement of those shtetl Jews with the land of Israel in their art, religion, and education (both religious and later secular).
Another was the complex relationship between the Jews and their neighbors as, on the very same day, some of the latter saved Jewish townspeople and others turned them over to the Nazis, not only due to hatred but to a desire to loot their possessions.

Then, too, was the profoundly important role of the individual in history. My book was only possible because a Soviet commissar, a tremendously decent man who had Jewish friends from before the German invasion, saved hundreds of lives on his own and at tremendous personal risks in his partisan group’; because three Polish policemen let two dozen Jews escape, as their comrades machine-gunned others a few blocks away; and because of the courage of Jews who became partisans or performed selfless deeds.

As I said, though, Jewish history was comprised of far more than the Holocaust. It was amazing to see a town whose Jewish community was almost all involved in some sort of adult education, from discussing psalms to studying Talmud.

And while Dolhinov was never a secular town—the main act of rebellion by the 1930s was some young people who might sneak a cigarette on Shabbat—the creation of a Polish-funded Zionist yet Yiddish-speaking school continued that tradition of exalting study. And it was a place where the community’s basic unity was so tremendous that the local branch of the left-wing Hashomer Ha-Tzair youth movement was completely composed of fully Orthodox Jews.

I’m sorry if brevity here forces me to speak in images that might already be all too familiar to you. The breadth of the book enables the telling of individual stories, which is what this is all about. If I had to condense all this down to a single sentence, it would be what I told the contemporary residents of Dolhinov—with no Jews left after a 400-year-long stay—standing in the old Jewish graveyard. But the point applied to them as well:

If we don't respect those who came before us, and who made our existence possible, how can we expect anyone to respect us?

Children of Dolhinov is available for free at http://www.gloria-center.org/pt_free_books/children-of-dolhinov-our-ancestors-and-ourselves/.

It is one of 13 free books of mine I’ve put at the site regarding Middle East politics and also U.S. foreign policy which can be seen through http://www.gloria-center.org/2013/02/new-gloria-free-books-project-13-books-available-for-free-download/.

Professor Barry Rubin, Director, Global Research in International Affairs (GLORIA) Center http://www.gloria-center.org
The Rubin Report blog http://rubinreports.blogspot.com/
He is a featured columnist at PJM http://pajamasmedia.com/barryrubin/.
Editor, Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA) Journal http://www.gloria-center.org
Editor Turkish Studies,http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t713636933%22

Dolginovo residents who came to Eretz yisrael in the 1800s'

Dolhinov

If there are any DRASNINs (all possible spellings) whose family came from
Dolginovo, Belarus, please contact me.

     I have not been able to find my great grandmother Rachel Leia or Lena Drasnan
Horowicz's death or burial information in almost fifteen years of looking.
She was born in ~1841 in or near Dolginovo (Dolhinow), now Belarus. I do not
know her parents' or siblings names.  After her husband Leib Horowicz died in 1905,
she emigrated to the States with her three children Efroim (my grandfather) and
his twin sisters Freide and Dora. They arrived in NYC July 11, 1905.

     Lena was a baker in Dolginovo.  I have a letter my grandfather sent to her
in 1907 c/o Ginsburg & Klausner, P.O.Box 107, S. Fallsburg Station, NY where I
believe she was working, perhaps in a bakery or for a resort.

     I believe she died ~1911 but I don't know where.  Efroim's wife and son are
buried in Mt. Hebron Cemetery (Cong Beit Abraham Anshei Dolhinow). Lena's daughter Dora is buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery, Lena's daughter Freide is buried in Mt. David Cemetery.

     Thank you for your suggestions.
     Best Regards,
     Susan Goldsmith
     San Francisco Bay Area, California

Researching GOLDSHMID, GITTES (GADYE, GADIE), FILVINSKY (PILVINSKY),
SHLOMOVICH (SHLIOMOVICH)Lithuania
TOBIAS (TOUBES), DRASNAN, ROZANSKY, HOROWICZ Dolginovo, Stolbtsy,
ovvy Sverzhen, Mir, Belarus
WAKSMAN, SONENBLIK Ostrowiec, Sandomierz, Poland
DAVIS(DAVID), HAFNER Botosani, Romania


From: Roxanne Richardson <roxanne.richardson@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 2 May 2014 13:37:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

My husband's grandmother, Fannie MEYERS was born in Belarus in 1903.   She and her
two older brothers, Joseph and Irving, immigrated with their parents Hyman and
Sadie to New York City when she was very young (0-3 yrs). I can t find passenger
manifests for the family, nor naturalization documents for her father or for her
brothers, despite searching every way I could think of, including any girls with
the initials F M born in 1903, who immigrated between 1903 and 1907 with
nationality Russia or Jewish. (I don t know what given names they might have
traveled under.  Hyman was probably Chaim, Sadie might have been Shayna, I assume
Joseph was Yosef or something similar.  Fannie may have been Feige, Irving may have
been Israel, but I don t know.  At this point, I question whether the surname was
actually MEYERS.  Maybe MEYER or MEIER, or maybe something else. No idea.)

One of Irving s daughters emailed me a couple of years ago and said she heard the
family was from Gomel, but she didn t know if that was true or not.   She mentioned
that there had been a pogrom in Gomel when Irving was a little boy, and he had
almost been trampled by a horse.  It was then that the family decided to emigrate.
I have confirmed that there was a pogrom in Gomel in 1903.  Irving would have been
3 or 4 years old, and Fannie would have been an infant, just a few months old.

Hyman and Sadie MEYERS were buried in Mount Hebron Cemetery in Flushings, Queens.
The section they are buried in is associated with the society  Beth Abraham Anshei
Dolhinov.   My understanding is that this was a landsmanshaft, as well as a
congregation.  Dolhinov is a village in Belarus, but it is very far from Gomel.

Today I received the marriage cert for Fannie MEYERS and Sol SCHONWETTER, which
says Fannie was born in  Humil  Russia (which is another way of writing Gomel, given
the transliteration challenges). In addition, I received Sadie MEYER s death cert,
which lists Sadie's parents' names, Joseph YEGUTKIN and Yettie COHEN.

The YEGUTKIN surname seems to be a nice lead, as it s not common at all, so I have
used JGFF to contact other people researching this surname, including one who is
researching this surname in Gomel.

What I can t figure out is why a family from Gomel, which was quite large and for
which there were several landsmanshaftn societies in NYC, would belong to a
landsmanshaft for Dolhinov?  Is that likely, or is it more likely that they were,
indeed, from Dolhinov, but for some reason would say they were from Gomel?

We have corresponded before, but I don't remember the circumstances surrounding our emails. 
I chanced upon an early Naturalization from my Epstein Family (Bangor, Maine) and the town listed was Dalhinoff (to the best of my being able to read it).  When I googled it, YOU came up.  Do I have the correct spelling?  Is it in Greater Vilna? 
 
Best regards,
 
Cindy Potter Taylor
Boynton Beach, FL
Dear Cindy,
Yes it is and I created a few pages for it ;
 http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/dolhinov.html

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dolginovo/dolginovo.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dolginovo/dolginovo.html

EPSTEIN - Avraham-Ber (the shohet) & family perished in Dolginovo in 1942.

Dolginovo in recent years; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_new_scenes.html

Dolhinov

Sonia daughter of Lieb Dimenstein and Benjamin Baruch son of Zaav Volf Markman. Survivors from Dolginovo.

From: Shmuel Burstein <divvash@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, Aug 6, 2015 at 10:32 AM
Subject: Re: Dolginovo archives and gustbook
To: eilat gordin <egl.comments@gmail.com>

Thank you Eilat so very  much.

It is not my family, I am writing the story of Zelik Dimenstein and Mindel (Rubin) Katzovich. For the past sixty years they have been using the name "Diamond." Mrs Diamond is a cousin to Dr Victor Rubin who recently had the memorial plaque unveiled on Tel Aviv University campus.

When the manuscript is fully edited (early September, please G-d) it will be my pleasure to write to you again for instructions so we can to upload it onto the site. 

Again, thank you for your kindness. We will be in touch.

Kol Tuv

Shmuel

Sent from my iPad

On Aug 6, 2015, at 12:03 PM, eilat gordin <egl.comments@gmail.com> wrote:

 

From: Shmuel Burstein <divvash@verizon.net>
Date: Tue, Aug 4, 2015 at 8:56 AM
Subject: Permission for photos in memoir
To: "egl.comments@gmail.com" <egl.comments@gmail.com>

Shalom,

Please tell me how I can receive permission to use some photos for a Partisan- family memoir I  recently completed.

The family is from Dolhinov and I found wonderful photos of the town on your website. If you need more information please let me know. The book will not be for sale, rather a family memoir and educational use on line.

Many thanks for any and all assistance.

Shmuel Burstein

Dear Shmuel,

Please share your family story with us on the Dolhinov site! You are welcome to use pictures from the site, just let us know what pictures you use and give a credit to the site. Please tell me about your family!
Thanks,
Eilat

From: Shmuel Burstein <divvash@verizon.net>
Date: Tue, Aug 4, 2015 at 8:56 AM
Subject: Permission for photos in memoir
To: "egl.comments@gmail.com" <egl.comments@gmail.com>

Shalom,

Please tell me how I can receive permission to use some photos for a Partisan- family memoir I  recently completed.

The family is from Dolhinov and I found wonderful photos of the town on your website. If you need more information please let me know. The book will not be for sale, rather a family memoir and educational use on line.

Many thanks for any and all assistance.

Shmuel Burstein

Dear Shmuel,

Please share your family story with us on the Dolhinov site! You are welcome to use pictures from the site, just let us know what pictures you use and give a credit to the site. Please tell me about your family!
Thanks,
Eilat