eilatgordinlevitan.com
Krasne Home Page
Krasne Guestbook Archive - 2
Archived on October 1, 2003
Krasne Guestbook

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Hi, I typed in my grandfathers name in the search engine online to see if I could find anything out about my ancestry and your website came up. I saw that there was information about my family written on June 17th in your guestbook. I was wondering where you found the information. I am the daughter of Judy Graffman. Annie Isaacson was my great grandmother. I would love to know how you found your information and if you have any questions for me please let me know. I live in Baltimore,Maryland. Great website!


Lorena
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- Thursday, September 25, 2003 at 07:10:26 (PDT)
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Bruce Sanders' theory is that having the sugar cube visible for all to see,
while drinking tea, was a sign that you could afford sugar. I'd like to
expand this with some nice info in an eMail which I kept an year ago - but
could not find on-line now. I had to do some research for a friend. His family is related to the
Weizmanns from Motol. Chaim Weizmann, the first president of modern Israel,
was born in Motol, in today's Belarus. Searching for Weizmanns and Motol, I
came across this. The author of the eMail.mentioned quoted his uncle Aaron.
Aaron - believed to live across from the Weizmanns in Motol - said that
"the Weizmanns were so rich" that....
"they had sugar in their tea every day." !!
Certainly many of us take some things for granted nowadays - sugar, for
example. Extracting and refining sugar from sugar beet was the activity of
some of my family members. Probably, the Weizmann's sugar came from sugar
beet, too. By the way, I remember the tradition of cube-in-teeth and tea- in- tall-
glasses (with and without handles) for family members originating as North
as Vilna Gubernia and as South as Kremenchug, Ukraine. Who copied whom?
Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina .
- Monday, September 15, 2003 at 20:19:25 (PDT)
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Jewish families in Krasne 1941 The list is based on my memory. I am not young any more and my memory isn't as it used to be. The list includes the surname and first name of the head of the family, except those whose surnames were identical and their first name I couldn't recall.
I ask the forgiveness of all those whom I didn't mention.
Arie Shevach


Arliuk Shabtai
Alperovitch
Axelrod
Brudner Motl
Brudner Noach
Brudner (big store)
Cyrulnik yosel
Chodosh
Chanin Mordchai
Dishler Leiser
Flechtman Avraham
Galperin Nochim
Gringaus Avrom-Chaim
Galperin Jechiel
Galperin Mordchay
Gringaus Jekutiel
Gurevitch (the hotel)
Gilbert Alexander
Gordon Yosel
Goldin Azriel
Izrailevitch Jechezkel
Kupershtoch Libe
Kaganovitch Chaim
Kraytchik Judl.
Kamienietzki Sholem
Kamienietzki Zalmen
Kamienietzki Yosel
Kaplan Aba
Kaplan Eliyahu
Katz
Kupershtoch Libe
Kirshner Shmuel
Lechovitzki Mordchai
Lulav Liova
Lifshitz Elyiahu
Monin Judl
Monin Aharon
Piltz Jacov
Plotkin Chaim- Dovid
Pik Getsl
Reznik Israel
Shkliar Chaim
Sklut Jacov
Sklut Shimon
Szewach Benjamin
Shkliar Chaim
Tov
Waynshtein Avraham
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- Sunday, August 03, 2003 at 08:58:02 (PDT)
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I would like to thank Arie Shevach for the list of families of Krasne that I will post on the site in a few days.
Jewish families in Krasne 1941 The list is based on my memory. I am not young any more and my memory isn't as it used to be. The list includes the surname and first name of the head of the family, except those whose surnames were identical and their first name I couldn't recall.
I ask the forgiveness of all those whom I didn't mention.
Arie Shevach


Arliuk Shabtai Kraytchik Judl.
Alperovitch Kamienietzki Sholem
Axelrod Kamienietzki Zalmen
Brudner Motl Kamienietzki Yosel
Brudner Noach Kaplan Eliyahu
Brudner (big store) Kaplan Aba
Cyrulnik yosel Katz
Chodosh Kupershtoch Libe
Chanin Mordchai Kirshner Shmuel
Dishler Leiser Monin Judl
Flechtman Avraham Monin Aharon
Galperin Nochim Piltz Jacov
Gringaus Avrom-Chaim Plotkin Chaim-Dovid
Galperin Jechiel Kaganovitch Chaim
Gringaus Jekutiel Sklut Jacov
Gurevitch (the hotel) Sklut Shimon
Gilbert Alexander Szewach Benjamin
Shkliar Chaim Tov
Gordon Yosel Waynshtein Avraham
Goldin Azriel Pik Getsl
Izrailevitch Jechezkel Lifshitz Elyiahu
Lechovitzki Mordchai Reznik Israel
Lulav Liova Gordon Yosel
Kupershtoch Libe Galperin Mordchay
Kaganovitch Chaim


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- Sunday, August 03, 2003 at 08:36:35 (PDT)
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To: EilatGordn


I am interested in the Gordon family from Krasne. My father and all the family always said Vilna but his papers said Krasne. His father was Reb Oizer HaKohain. His mother Rochel Kunin. (can't find any Kunins). My father was Israel, changed to Lowell Israel or Irwin here. His brother was Samuel, later Sidney. Dad had uncles Isaac, Max, Joseph?, and at least 2 aunts-Anna Plotnick and Hanna Maalla Kunin. They all ended up in Stamford, CT and branched out from there. Perhaps you know any of these? I know that Gordon is a very common name from Lithuania.
Gail
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- Friday, July 18, 2003 at 08:02:28 (PDT)
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Subj: pedro alperowicz
Date: 6/30/03 6:59:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: salonelcano@arnet.com.
To: eilatGordn@aol.com Dear Eilat:
Today, José Alperovich is the new governator of the Tucuman´s province.(Argentina)
José is the son of León Alperovich.
regards.
Pedro Alperowicz
José Alperovich' family originated in Vileyka.

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/alperovitz/20303_1_b.gif

click for picture and information
- Monday, June 30, 2003 at 10:10:52 (PDT)
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Jason Alpert writes; My mother Dorothy (OBM) had a best friend. Her name was Ada (nee Meltzer) Abromson. Ada and her husband John retired to Phoenix Arizona.
I believe that Mary (Mrs Samuel) Skolnik was a close relative of Ada or John.
Dear all;
I received a family tree from Jewel Fishkin that tells the connection;
Ada (nee Meltzer) Abromson was married John (born 1909 died 1992) the brother of Mary (Mrs Samuel) Skolnik (she was the youngest child of the family). Here is the Abromson family tree in a short version;
Chana nee Edelman [daughter of John Adelman and Anne nee Skloot was born on May 18, 1874 in Russia. She died on February 2, 1960 in Auborn, Main she was married to; Luis Abromson died on December 25, 1947. Children;
1.Hyman Abramson was born in Krasne in 1894 and died in Lewiston, Maine in 1972
Spouse; Lena nee Cohen.Daughter Charlotte married Ernest Bart (Susan, Nancy, Laurnce)
2.Celia abromson was born April 5, 1900 and died in Lewiston, Maine January 25, 1996. Spouse; Morris Supovitz.Children; Paul and Beverly Supovitz+ Paul Hurvitz (son James Hurvitz)
3. Fannie Abrmson born May 10, 1902 and died ? Spouse;Israel Abraham Miller
Married in Old Orchard Beach, Maine 9-19- 1926. Children; Stanley John Miller (Scott, David, William) Maynard Miller (Diana and Anita). Judith + Henry Jordan.Joseph Milton Miller (Matthew). Michelle Lynn+ Ryan Damare
4. Esther Abromson born 11- 21- 1903 in Auborn, Maine.Died 11- 27- 1995 in Chicago. Married Max Gordon in Portland, Maine ( children; Howard died as a baby in 1944, Ruth Adele married Herbert Halperin)
5. Benjamin Abramson Spouse; Natalie Supovitz (Son Michael died in 1993, grandsons; Richard and Daniel)
6. John Abramson born 1909 died 1992 in Portland, Maine married Ada Meltzer (sons; Irving Joel Abromson and Morton Colp Abromson)
7. Mary Abromson Spouse; Sam Skolnick (sons; Louise and Steve.)
..
- Friday, June 27, 2003 at 10:29:44 (PDT)
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Enjoyed the website.
Wilbur
- Friday, June 27, 2003 at 09:32:50 (PDT)
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1. Towns (Shtetlakh) within area of former Vilner Gubernia
where Jason's family once lived
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Dieveniskes (Yiddish: Di-VEN-i-shok)
Dolhinov/Dolhinow/Dolginovo (Yiddish: Dal-HI-nev)
Dokshitzy (Yiddish: DOK-shitz) [Home of Yiddish journalist Nissan Gordon (OB"M)]
Horodok/Grudek/Gorodok (Yiddish: Ha-ro-DOK)
Ilja/Ilya (Yiddish: IL-ye)
Krasne/Krasnoje-Nad-Usza [Krasnoye on the Usha River] (Yiddish: KRAS-ne)
Kurenets/Kurenitz/Kurzeniec (Yiddish KU-re-nitz)
Molodechno (Yiddish: Ma-lo-DETCH-ne)
Oshmyany (Yiddish: Osh-mi-YE-ne)
Radoshkovichi (Yiddish: Ra-desh-KO-vitz) [At the former "Russian-Polish" border]
Rakov (Yiddish: RA-kev)
Smorgon (Yiddish: Smar-GON) [Birthplace of famed Cantors Koussevitzky (OB"M)]
Vileyka/Vileika/Vilejka/Wilejka (Yiddish: ViLEYke)
Vishnevo (Yiddish: VISH-ne-ve)
Volozhin (Yidish: Va-LO-zhin) [Home the the famed Volozhiner yeshiva]
Below are some scattered notes from my files and my memory on the Scolnik and Manpel Families (who are among the descendants of Eliyohu Zaludik)
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Kalman and Mary Scolnik (both deceased)
210 Ash Street
Lewiston, Maine 04240
Tel. 207-782-5794 Kalman and Mary were married 9/23/1910.
They are the parents of Samuel, Bill, and Eddy Scolnik.
Mary's yortsait is 24 Nissan. I (Jason I Alpert) knew Kalman and Mary well. (I was born in Lewiston, Maine, March 8, 1940.) My mother worshipped her Aunt Mary, and repeatedly took me to visit her. Many years ago, I spent a few hours with Kalman Scolnik at 210 Ash Street. I picked his brain in compiling our family tree. Unfortunately, Kalman has passed on, and the piece of paper containing that family-tree has been lost. Some things survive in my memory, to wit: Kalman said that our ultimate ancestor was named Eliyahu Der Vilner (meaning Eliyahu from the City of Vilna). This is undoubtedly the Eliyahu Zaludik that is listed on Dave Fessler's excellent family-tree (see below). (And, no -- this is NOT the Vilner Gaon.) Kalman lived to the age of perhaps 110 or 120. In case you want to try to figure out his exact age, consider this: Kalman once told me that he (Kalman) was born in Kurenitz (Kurenets in Belorus) "the year of the big fire." Kalman also told me that he'd had a brother who'd changed his name to Alperowicz (a very popular family-name in Kurenitz), and that this brother had then moved (from Kurenitz) to Bobruisk (Belorus). Someone should try to locate any descendants of this displaced family-member ...
Kalman's wife (and first-cousin) was Mary. "Aunt Mary" was a sister of my grandfather (Eliyohu-Shlomo or "E-le-SHLEY-me") Gurewitz. My mother Dorothy Gurewitz Alpert (Eleshleyme's daughter) used to address her as " Mi-YA-she" (probably from the Russian name Mar-ya-sha)" My mother OB"M passed away Feb 1991.
Kalman and Mary's two unmarried sons, Bill and Eddy, still live at 210 Ash Street in Lewiston. Bill and Eddy probably possess a treasure-trove of information that could be used for family genealogical research. By this I mean correspondence from pre-war Europe. This is because the Scolniks have lived at 210 Ash Street in Lewiston "forever", and that address has for many years served as a rally point for separated and dispersed family members to seek each other. (According to Dave Fessler's family-tree, Bill was born in 1913, and Eddy in 1917 -- so I wouldn't procrastinate contacting them.)
For example, cousin Ida Manpel Rubin (see below) once told me the story of how she'd been reunited with her brother Elye after the Holocaust. She said that Elye had written to the Scolniks at 210 Ash Street saying that he was still alive. He'd survived the Nazis, and was living in Russia. (The only American address that he had was 210 Ash Street.) The Scolnik's contacted Ida in NYC upon receipt of this letter (more about this below). Nevertheless, Ida disliked her uncle Kalman. She called him "a miyeser shlang!". (Perhaps she was jealous of his great wealth???) Ida (Chaya-Hinda) MANPEL was born in Dalhinov (Dolginovo), which is now in Belarus. Ida emigrated to the USA, where she married Israel "Tulie" RUBIN. They lived in Brooklyn, NY.
I used to have a b/w photo of Ida Manpel and her parents and siblings, sent from Dalhinov to my grandfather Louis Sam Gurewitz in Auburn, Maine. It was sent before she emigrated to the USA. Does anyone have a copy of this priceless photo? I doubt that Ida is still alive. You could check with her son Lewis -- with whom I once played chess while the Rubin family lived on (367?) Miller Avenue in the East New York section of Brooklyn -- around 1954 or so. Here is his address: Rubin, Lewis MD (Urologist)
2320 Bath St # 309
Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Phone: 805-682-7661

After Ida Manpel emigrated to the USA, her brother Elye Manpel remained behind in Dalhinov (Dolginovo). Elye was there during the Holocaust. Fortunately, Elye caught the very last train that managed to leave Dalhinov before the Nazis arrived, and thus miraculously escaped the invading Nazis. MANY YEARS LATER, a letter from him was received by the Scolniks at 210 Ash Street in Lewiston. He was (is?) living in the Russian city of Orel (pronounced Aryol). I am attaching a file named Manpel.GIF. This is an image of Elye's address written in Cyrillic characters. Here is my transliteration of the Cyrillic version, and it may be WRONG.
Elye Manpel
Komsomolskaya Street 46, Apt. 3
Orël, Russia 302001 (ANSI character-set, used in Windows)
Or‰l, Russia 302001 (ASCII character-set, used in DOS)
I believe that Elye was Ida's YOUNGEST sibling. Therefore, he might still be alive. Someone should try to locate him, and any possible descendants (as well as Kalman's brother in Bobruisk, mentioned above) ...
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Lewis Rubin's older brother is Seymour, and the oldest is Jackie.
I found these 2 addresses for Seymour on the Internet.
I don't know if either is correct. Rubin, Seymour
2085 Rkwy Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 763-5419 Rubin, Seymour
4218 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 769-2444 I also found Jackie's address on the Internet. I KNOW that this address is correct, because I used to visit Ida there.
Rubin, Jack
2896 W 8th St
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 373-2049
(718) 373-0230 Since Jackie Rubin is occupying his parents' apartment, and since he is the oldest son -- I would think that he might be in possession of old family photos and correspondence from pre-war Eastern Europe. (Similar situation to Bill and Eddy Scolnik, above)
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***** More About the Family ***** During the years 1953-1956 (when I first came to NYC from Maine to study in a yeshiva), I used to regularly visit cousin Ida Manpel-Rubin and her husband Israel (Tulie), and their three sons.
They lived in the East New York section of Brooklyn, at 367 ? Miller Avenue.
(Later, they moved to 2896 West 8th Street in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn.) After visiting with Ida, I would walk over to (129?) Miller Avenue, and visit with cousin Sadie (Mrs Jake) Friedland, and her daughter Pauline. (I was just 13 or 14 years old. Ida and then Sadie would both feed me well.) I believe that Sadie had a sister (Becky Williams?) maybe in Far Rockway,NY. Besides their daughter Pauline, Sadie and Jake had a son named Al Friedland. Al married his second-cousin Estelle (nee Gurewitz), from Ithaca, New York (more below). -----------------------------------------------------------------------
My grandfather Louis Sam (Eleshleyme) Gurewitz (changed from Zaludik) had these siblings (as far as I recall): 1. Mary (Maryasha), who married her first-cousin Kalman Scolnik.
(They lived at 210 Ash Street in Lewiston, Maine, as mentioned above.)
2. David, of Lewiston, Maine. He never married.
3. Harry, of Ithaca, New York. [I recall now that Mary's husband Kalman couldn't stomach Mary's brother Dovid. Dovid would have to sneak over to 210 Ash St. for a meal when Kalman wasn't home. Maybe this is one of the reasons that cousin Ida Manpel-Rubin didn't like him. (As I mentioned above.)
I never met Harry Gurewitz. According to my records, Harry's daughter Estelle married her second-cousin Al Friedland. They had three children: Rickie, Phillip, Jay Lee, and Lisa Sue.
I don't remember if I ever met any of Estelle's children. I MAY have met Estelle and Al Friedland, possibly at Sadie's home on 129 Miller Avenue in Brooklyn. I don't remember.) I vaguely remember that family members would stay with Estelle, whenever they visited Florida. (Why pay for a hotel?)
My records show her address as: Estelle Friedland
17521 N. E. 1st Court
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162 But I couldn't find it on the Internet. I am fairly sure that her husband Al Friedland has passed away. I don't know about her. The children are probably alive.
------------------------------------------------------------------- A 3rd son of Kalman and Mary Scolnik is Sam Scolnik. Sam is married to the former Mary Abromson. He is a (retired?) lawyer.
Here is their address: Samuel and Mary Scolnik
3700 Calvert Pl
Kensington, Maryland 20895
301-949-0519
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******** Re the surname "GUREWITZ" ********
Ida Manpel once told me that the family-name Gurewitz wasn't genuine. The name was really Zheludek (Ida even wrote Zheludek for me on a paper.)
Also, As a child, I once questioned "Uncle Dovid" (as I used to fondly address him) as to why the family name had been changed from Zheludek to Gurewitz. His reply was something like: "Vos bin ich shul-dik vos der ta-te hot amol ge-ton?" -- which gave me the impression that he couldn't, or didn't want to, explain why his father Yosef (after whom I'm named), had changed the name. Well, this is confirmed by Dave Fessler's family-tree. Only there, the name is spelled Zaludik -- which is probably more correct.
There is a Yizkor-book commemorating a TOWN named ZHELUDOK. See
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zaludok/zheludok.html
Many years ago I skimmed through this book. In it I found some cousins of
mine (from a different side of the family, not related to the Scolniks and Zaludiks) named ALPEROWICZ (ALPEROVITCH) and SZYFMANOWICZ (SHIFMANOVITCH). (Lyuba SZYFMANOWICZ died in the Holocaust according to page 314 in this book.)
It doesn't make sense for a family-name (surname) to be identical to a town name. Someone from Vilna might be named Vilner (not Vilna). Someone from ZHELUDOK might be named ZHELUDKER. That's why I think that Zaludik is correct. An alternate spelling might be Zaludok or Zaludek.
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According to Lester Solnin (changed from Sosensky) and Marian Anderson, Dave Fessler of Houston, Texas, has a large amount of information. They sent me a paper copy of Dave's family-tree, which is entitled "Descendants of Eliyohu Zaludik. It is a masterpiece ...
They also sent me a digitized image (Paperport .MAX file) of a 1-page Report, which is information extracted from Dave's family-tree (database).
Dave's email address is dfessler@houston.rr.com. -------------------------------------------------------------------
Speaking of "Sosensky", I vaguely recall seeing a photo of an old bearded man. I think he was a cousin named Sosensky. And I very vaguely recall being told that he was referred to as "Der Feter" ("The Uncle"). ====================================
I know nothing about the following person:
P Scolnik
Lewiston, Maine
207-784-5573 -------------------------------------------------------------------
I know nothing about the following person (Helen Manpel).
Perhaps she is Ida's sister-in-law or niece?
Manpel, Helen
1071 Eglinton West
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Tel. 416-782-6465
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Same is true for the following couple: Manpel, Jack & Frida
569 Sheppard Avenue, West
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Tel. 416-636-9640 ------------------------------------
This is Ida's brother (a wealthy merchant?). Manpel, Louis
989 Eglinton Avenue, Apt. #223
Toronto, Ontario, CANADA M6C2C6
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On 10/13/1985 I (Jason I Alpert) attended a meeting of the KURENITZER FAREYN (Kurenitz Landsmanschaft or "Society"), held in New York City. There I unexpected ly met a man named Julius Scolnik, of the Bronx, NY. (This is NOT the Julius Scolnik of Lewiston, Maine.)
Julius said that he is a cousin of Kalman Scolnik of Lewiston, Maine. Julius was born circa 1897. At that time, Julius's telephone was 933-1062 (now area-code 718).
On 5/15/1986 I spoke with Julius by phone. He said that a meeting of the KURENITZER FAREYN had just been held on Sunday, 5/4/1986.
============= RESOURCES ============= *** Jewish Home for the Aged in in Portland, Maine ("Cedars Campus") *** My mother Dorothy (OBM) had a best friend. Her name was Ada (nee Meltzer) Abromson. Ada and her husband John retired to Phoenix Arizona.
I believe that Mary (Mrs Samuel) Skolnik was a close relative of Ada or John.
An Internet search that I just made for "Abromson AZ US" yielded no matches.
But a search for Ada and John's son Joel yielded the following:
I J and Linda Abromson
25 Fall Ln, Portland, ME 04103
207-797-4438 I believe that Linda is on the Board of Directors of the Jewish Home for the Aged in in Portland, Maine -- which is now called "Cedars Campus"
http://www.thecedarscampus.com/ppf.html I mention this because the records of Cedars could possibly be a great source of info for people researching Jewish families in Maine.
For example, I believe that a cousin from Auburn, Nochum Widrowitz (who was called Kop-Af-Kop) and possibly his wife Reyze ("Reize-Nochum's"), retired to this Home for the Aged.
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******* Zalman Alpert *******
Zalman is librarian @ Yeshiva University's Mendel Gottesman Library. Zalman has published scholarly articles on Lubavitch history -- in the English section of the ALGEMEINER Journal. Zalman's father was born in Kurenitz, and Zalman is an expert on Kurenitz. He's from New Haven, Connecticut -- a city where many Jews from Vileyka, Kurenits, and Krasne area settled. Zalman's email address is alpert@ymail.yu.edu ------------------------------------
**** Websites **** Eilat Gordin-Levitan's Kurenitzer website is
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/kurenets.html JGFF (Jewish Genealogical Society Family Finder) website is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/ Miscellaneous other genealogical websites: http://www.ajhs.org/genealog.htm
http://www.avotaynu.com
http://www.jgsny.org
http://www.JewishGen.org
http://www.jewishgen.org/ajgs
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/links.html
http://www.lds.org/site_main_menu/frameset-global-bas_bel.html
http://www.nara.gov/nara/nail.html
http://members.aol.com/rechtman/yizkorbk.htm
http://www.remember.org/children/tracing.html
http://shamash.org/holocaust
http://home.att.net/~JGSNYCem/WPAForm.htm
http://www.yivoinstitute.org/archlib/genealog.htm#resources

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As cousin Steve Sosensky once wrote, I "have a lot of other things to take care of, and am putting genealogy on hold..."
I will try to assist others in such research, by providing information that I have, and/or by translating from the Yiddish or Hebrew. But I cannot actively engage in the research myself ... maybe, later.
So, please -- don't send me info -- just questions.
Also, I am quite knowledable in Yiddish. I've spent vast amounts of time reading old Yiddish correspondence. If you have such correspondence, please mail same to me. ------------------------------------
For more info, please telephone me on 212-414-8738, or email me.
-- Jason I Alpert (Yos'l ) ~~~~~~~~ END of Scolnik.txt FILE ~~~~~~~~



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- Friday, June 27, 2003 at 07:46:44 (PDT)
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From: "Ronald S. Deutsch"
Date: Sun, 8 Jun 2003 20:26:02 -0400
To:
Eilat Gordin wrote me that you were in contact with Randy Daitch who
specializes in genealogy from the Vilna Gubernia area. Our family
originates from Dolhinov which is in that region. Wondering, if you
could put me in touch with him to see if him and I are related.
Thanks!
Ron Deutsch
1302 St. Paul's Way
Crownsville, MD 21032
(410) 849-3016 ====================================================
To which I reply:
---------------------- I've been out of touch with Randy for many years.
If you find him, please apprise me of his whereabouts.
My records re Randy are below.
(I doubt if his Venice CA address below is still valid.)
------------------------------------------------------ Randy Daitch
206 Fifth Avenue
Venice, California 90291
213-399-7092 Randy's surname is pronounced as per its original Polish spelling
"Dejcz" ("ej" like "ey" in "they"). In other words, "Daitch" with the
"ai" as in wait. Randy is mentioned on page 18 of Avotaynu magazine, July 1985 issue. The
publisher of Avotayne magazine is Gary Mokotoff (see below).
Randy stayed at my former apartment, 100 Forsyth Street, NYC from
8-6-1985 thru 8-20-85. Randy and Gary co-authored the Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex. See websites:
www.avotaynu.com and www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html Or contact
Gary Mokotoff Randy's family was from Sharkovshchizna (Sharkovshchina or Sarkauscyna),
Belorus. Check out this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/Shtetls/ssharkovshchina.htm -- Jason I Alpert (Yosl), 212-414-8738



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- Friday, June 27, 2003 at 03:38:22 (PDT)
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The girl who survived
By Arie Shevach (szewach) In the large home of Mordechai (Motel) and Sonia Brudner in Krasne, dwelt a Polish lady named Kierczowa who worked as a midwife. She was childless and became greatly attached to the family's children- Noah-Mairem and Rivkah.
In 1941, when all the Jews of the town of Krasne were put in the ghetto, the lady's apartment was annexed to the ghetto area. She obviously received a "compensation" for her apartment-the house of a Jew by the name of Yudel Monin- one of the wealthiest men in town, his house was located outside of the area of the (designated for the Jewish) ghetto and was seized from him. Knowing that he was well off you can understand that the house was quite big, and it was split to two. The second half was given to a different non Jewish resident who lived there with his family and children.
When Kierczowa moved out to her new and enlarged home, she offered to take Rivka, the Brudners' young daughter to reside and remain with her. The family knew that the girl would be much safer there than in the ghetto.
As it was done in many houses in the ghetto, the new Jewish inhabitants of the Brudners' house [many families lived in the small numbers of homes that were designated as the ghetto] worked hard to secretly build a hiding place, "malina". This hide out was to be used at times when the Germans would come to the ghetto in order to randomly catch some Jews and slaughter them. Kierczowa's apartment was given to Shmuel Dovrovsky, a Jewish dental technician. This man worked for the German local officers. To allow him to complete his job for them, his apartment was connected to and electric supply. This fact was well exploited by the Jews who were not allowed to have outside contacts. A radio that was put in the hiding place [Jews were not permitted to own radios] was secretly connected to electricity and in this way, all who knew of the secret would gather at night hours in order to listen and be informed of the current situation in the front.
On March of 1943, the day of the massacre of the Krasne ghetto, the Germans discovered the radio on which Kierczowa's name was written. They took the trouble to find her. Being a German "folksdeutsch" she managed to quickly seem innocent in the eyes of the Germans. Her one problem was the Jewish girl, Rivka, whom she secretly kept in her house all that time. In 1944 the area was freed by the Soviet Union. When I came back from the war at the middle of August 1944, the town was still under a Soviet military rule. The military authorities appointed me as head of the local council (something similar to a mayor of a town council). This lasted for maybe two or three weeks. After that a local Soviet board was put up, composed of unknown outsiders as it was always done in the Soviet State.
One day, a local citizen who was required to serve in the army came to see me. He asked me to write him down as essential person who is needed here in the rear so that the military authorities would release him of the service. And this was his story: "I was Kierczowa's neighbor and I helped her hide a Jewish girl who was in her house when the Germans came knocking on her door to question her about the radio. Therefor now, you as a Jew, are obliged to save me from a sure death at the front. I, a father of four, how can you refuse to spare my wife and children?"
I told him to find the girl and bring her to me, and then we would talk the matter over. I had no clue of who and what he was talking about. Two weeks passed and in the midst of a bright day, the man reported to me with a little girl, frightened and starved. She was dirty, her clothes were torn, and she was crying and lacking the ability to speak.
It appeared that after Kierczowa "solved" the radio problem she had to get rid of the Jewish girl whom was in her custody. A woman from one of the villages was willing in return for payment, to take the girl under her care. The woman quickly kept the payment and left the girl outdoors on her own. The girl started wandering from village to village, working as a shepherdess. She dwelled with the farm animals, eating leftovers that were given to her and her life was constantly in danger being at the hands of every passerby who could recognize her and report her as a Jew to the Germans.
From that point I became her keeper. Being 19, without a family this was not a simple task for me.
At that time, a Jewish family who survived the war came to live in the town and received housing in the old house of Alter-the Jewish blacksmith. The family consisted of a mother, her three young children and the mother's sister. It was one of the only houses that survived the fire that the Germans set at their retreat. The financial state of Fina and Sonia Averbuch (the two sisters) was quite bad while mine was by then fairly good, perhaps very good. I was appointed as a manager of seven local factories spread out in the area, which produced turpentine, heavy oils and wooden charcoals as a by-product.
The sisters took upon themselves to take care of Rivka. The task was not easy, it took some time until she calmed down, started talking and coming back to herself. I had no problem supporting the six mouths while at that time the war was still going on not far from us.
With the liberation of Vilna, a school and dormitory was opened. The studies were held in Yiddish and Russian. I signed Rivka up and continued in watching out for her up until the authorities decided to close down the school. Rivka was then taken back to the sisters' home in Krasne. When I decided to come to Israel I of course took Rivka with me.
When I arrived in Israel, I came to know that my grandfather, Shimon Sklut [My mothers' father], was the brother of her grandmother, her mother's mother. We also found more relatives- Azriel and Taibel Goldin from Krasne, her sons Hirshel and Noah and her daughter Chiyna. Likewise, we found her father's brother Noah Brudner, his wife Maraisha of the Kaplan family from Olshany and their sons- Reuven and Benjamin Brudner. Luckily they all fled to Russia at the beginning of the war and managed to escape the Germans. When the war ended they were sent away to Poland as they were former Polish citizens and from there came to Israel.
Rivka is today happily married, a mother of two- a son and a daughter, and a proud grandmother to their children.
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- Tuesday, June 24, 2003 at 08:43:14 (PDT)
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The Shevach fmily from Krasne originated in Piesk.
There is; Piesk and Most, a Memorial Book
(Belarus) Piesk (Peski and Piaski)
53°21' / 24°38'
The Little Shtetl Piesk /Chaim Shevach (Argentina )http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Piaski/pie407.html
475 The Shevach Dynasty by Eizer Shevach [Shewach]
Training of the Lutzk Group by Khonon Shevach [Shewach]
Start of Organizations in Piesk by Natan Shevach [Shewach]
From Piesk List of perished; Shewach Aizik son of Abrahamek and family
Shewach Baskeh daughter of Yosed and family
Shewach Berl Keila and family; Bashka and family; Bentcheh and family
Shewach Berl son of Yosed and family
Shewach B'Vandeh daughter of Yosed and family
Shewach Eliazer wife Mery; son David and wife Berteh (nee Yitzakovitz) and children; Moshe and wife (nee Yitzakovitz) and children; niece Keila and family
Shewach Ester husband Shimon Dubovski; son Yakob
Shewach Ester daughter of Abramak and family
Shewach Gershon and family
Shewach Keila husband Mikal and children
Shewach Leizer Aharon wife Mery; son David and family; son Masha and family; daughter Keila and family;
Shewach Mendel wife Chaiya-Sarah and children
Shewach Moshe Gershon and family; son Mendel; wife Chaiya-Sarah and children; Shimon "The Pirer"; daughter Leah and family
Shewach Moshe Reuben wife Malka; son Zeidl
Shewach Ruvin wife and children
Shewach Shmuel-father and wife; daughter Bobl; daughter Leitcheh
Shewach Yidl son Zeidl and wife Chana and children; daughter Etkeh and husband Akiba
Shewach see Motl Leib pictures;
R' Yehuda Shebach
David, son of Leizer Shebach
402 Keila, daughter of Leizer Shebach
411 Dora Shebach with a friend
Founders of Zionist Movement in Piesk Seated left to right: 2. Leiby Lonsky 4. Henya Etzkovitzm. Teacher Zeidl Shebach. Standing left to right: 1. Ekhezkal Lisovsky, 2. Betty Eitzkovitz, 3. Mishka Shebach, Eitzl Shapiro
Chaim Shebach

Elka Shebach Moshe Mendel son of Israel Shebach
click for pictures
- Sunday, June 22, 2003 at 15:28:13 (PDT)
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Svir list of perished;
Ginzberg, Eliahu Moshe
Ginzberg, Chaya
Ginzberg, Shimcha
Feiga Ginzberg, Ginzberg, Dvora
Ginzberg, Chaim Hershel
Ginzberg, Diska
Ginzberg, Feigela
Ginzberg, Sheindel
Ginzberg, Dvora Leah
..
- Saturday, June 21, 2003 at 16:05:43 (PDT)
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My name is Hanny I am the daughter of Yaacov Kaplan from Israel.He grew up in a small village next to Krasne in Bellarus ,called Rechucioszina (about 1-1.5 km) from Krasne ,we can not find any mention of it and will be happy to know if you can may be assist us with it also we would like to add my fathers familly to the Krasne sight if we will not be able to find the village,how can we add information about the familly?
Thank you best regards,
Hanny
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- Saturday, June 21, 2003 at 15:53:00 (PDT)
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Yaakov Kaplan’s family[some information are from a phone call to Yaakov and his daughter; Hanny in Israel 6-21-2003] Dvora and Yaakov David Ginsburg lived in Dolhinov. They were born c 1860.
Their children;
1. Chaim Zvi Ginsburg moved to Swir and had a store there. He had three children; Zipora (born c 1921), Sheina (born 1922) and Dvora . The entire family perished in Swir.
2. Eliyahu Moshe Ginsburg also moved to Swir and had a store there. He had Simcha who ws born in 1922, Dvora and Yakov, They perished in Swir.
3. Feyga Dvush nee Ginsburg married Baynish Ginsburg {his mother; Roda was born c 1856}They had son ; David who was born c 1925 in Dolhinov and daughter ; Dvora ws born c 1933. David survived the war and wrote about it in the Dolhinov Yizkor book page 424.In 1945 he found out that his cousin ; Yakov Kaplan survived and he is stationed in the same town [Lignitz] nd he is a Major. They met and after they were both done with their army service [in 1950] they came to Israel via France. He died about four years ago in Rishon Letzion. The rest of the family perished in Dolhinov..
4. Sheina nee Ginsburg Lifshitz moved to Sau Paulo, Brazil before the war. She had a daughter; Dvora. Dvora kept in touch with Yakov Kaplan but he did not hear from her in the last few years.
5. Chana Chaya [born in Dolhinov in 1888] nee Ginsburg married Abba Kaplan [born in Dolhinov in 1886] in 1903. They had; Zipora born in 1912 in Dolhinov she mde Aliya to Israel before the war and lived in Kibbutz Afek. Miryam was born in 1917, Yaakov in 1922, Shlomo in 1924, Dvora in 1925, Bela in 1929 and Ytka in 1936. The family moved to a place near Krasne and all other then Yaakov *and Zipora perished there on March 17, 1943.
6. Shalom Shachna Ginsburg joined his daughter [Alsha Chorgin] in Detroit in the early 1920s. Yakov Kaplan met his cousin Alasha in 1971 while he was sent by Israel to the U.S and he was received very graciously and felt very close to her. She was much older then him [ maybe 90 years old] She had four children [three sons and a daughter]
*Yaakov Kaplan was born in 1922, in the townlet of Dolhinow, his parents moved to Krasne in his youth. The family owned an estate, which was used by the Zionist youth movements to train their member in agriculture in preparation for settlement in Palestine. As the son of Zionist parents, he was educated in the "Tarbut" school system, and he hoped to continue his higher education, but the German - Polish War destroyed his plans. With the
division of Poland between Germany and the USSR, overnight he found himself under Russian rule, and with a high school education, he was appointed as a supervisor of construction, a post he had almost until the German - Russian War in 1941. In May, 1941, he was recruited into the Red Army, and stationed with the Engineering Battalion #981, in the Armored Force of General
Lelushenko, located in the Daugavpils (Dvinsk) area of Latvia, where he was given an accelerated military training course. Military Service
On June 26, 1941, immediately after Germany attacked the USSR, he engaged in his first bloody battle against the German conqueror near Daugavpils, and from this point there began the terrible, hasty, disorganized Russian retreat that resulted in horrible losses of manpower and equipment. Every Russian attempt to cease the retreat and half the enemy was quickly shattered, and at
a great price. They were forced to abandon Valeika - Luki, Ostshkov,
Turupetz, and Salizrov, one after another, and when they were in Satriya - Russa, the Germans encircled them, leaving a few weak and hungry survivors. Realizing that as a Jew, his situation was even more precarious, he succeeded despite the danger, to sever his connection with his group, and to escape encirclement. He reached the Belgoya area on the main highway from Moscow to
Leningrad. In September, 1941, all those who originated from the western territories that had been annexed by the Russians in 1939, and whose loyalty was suspect were transferred eastward, and there they were assigned to labor - battalions. Yaakov belonged to Battalion 394, and so he was joined to military operation 183. He was appointed head of the communications apparatus on one of the factories that was evacuated from Kharkov, and was engaged in
the manufacture of was equipment. When Yaakov learned of the formation of a military force of Polish expatriates, though still vague, and the murder of Jews by Germans in the areas vanquished by them, he decided to leave his job, which was far from the front, and he and a group of other Jews traveled to Tashkent, determined to enlist and fight against the Germans, the murderers
of their brothers. They saw no justification for avoidance of danger and remaining in a secure place; their conscience demanded that they volunteer and enlist for army service. They arrived at Jambol in Kazakhstan, where they enlisted, and Yaakov was sent to Riazin for officers training school. In December, 1943, he became an officer and was dispatched with a group, the First Polish Parachutist Battalion, where they were subordinate to the partisan movement headquarters - "The Ludova Army.", and in a short time he was appointed Company Commander. In August, 1944, while still in Valamus,
Yaakov began dispatching to the rear of the German Front, crews of
parachutists that were trained under him, and they carried out very bold sabotage actions. With the front advancing, they came to Rowne, whence Yaakov, with the approval of headquarters, sent crews of parachutists on very dangerous missions, in which he personally participated. These crews succeeded in eliminating German units, suddenly appearing at their rear in surprise attacks, causing confusion and departing. Their purpose was to arouse insecurity in the hearts of the Germans and to annihilate them. After
the liberation of Warsaw, Yaakov continued in the framework of the First Army of the Polish People's Army, as a Company Commander - his participation on the battle front, and especially in the Sandomierz area, ceased at the German Border, because it was decided to transfer his company to bat! tle the national Ukrainians, who collaborated with the Germans in the liquidation of the
ghettos. It was in their destruction, that Yaakov saw an act of revenge for the spilling of his brothers' blood, and he completed his service in the Polish Army as a Deputy Head of the "Officers' Training School." Courtesy of:
Simon Wiesenthal Center
Los Angeles, CA 90035
I will write about the Kaplan side of the family [also originated in Dolhinov] later. Eilat .
- Saturday, June 21, 2003 at 15:46:46 (PDT)
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Stephen Coleman
. Abraham Lapides b: Abt. 1822 in Haradok, Belarus d: Unknown in Belarus ? . +Shosheh Raizal (Susie) Unknown b: Abt. 1827 in Lithuania/Belarus d: Unknown in Belarus ? Married: in Belarus ? 2 Dvora (Doba) Lapides b: 1847 in Haradok, Belarus d: 1911 in Canton, OH 2 Beila (Bessie) Lapides b: Abt. 1850 in Haradok, Belarus d: 17
3 Rose Sapiro b: Abt. 1877 in Haradok, Belarus ? d: Abt. 1961 in Sunland, CA
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- Friday, June 20, 2003 at 19:47:29 (PDT)
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My cousins that fell on the battlefield:
Mula Malkin fell on the way from Krasno to his Partisan unit,
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- Friday, June 20, 2003 at 19:09:44 (PDT)
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What my eyes have seen
by Pnina Hayat nee Potashnik
Translated by M. Porat
1941; The Soviets left Volozhyn in haste. The Germans entered the town without any resistance. The first sign of the Germans in the area was the unit of parachutists that descended near our home. Armed forces entered the town shortly after. The constant air bombing set the town on fire.
We were immediately forced to participate in various hard labor chores. The principal forced labor sites were the Polak's & Rapoport-Perelman's saw-mills. The women cleaned the Gestapo lodgments. We walked to work in groups. As soon as we would arrive they would start thrashing us with whips. We were ordered to put yellow patches on our sleeves. With time it changed to a yellow Star of David with the word “Jude” in the middle. We were forbidden to use the sidewalk. We had to walk in the middle of the road like horses. They ordered us to move into a designated Ghetto area. Shortly after enclosing the Volozhyn Jews in the Ghetto the Germans pushed inside its fence also the Jews of Olshan with their town-Rabbi. The congestion became unbearable. We were very deficient in nourishments. Bringing food inside the Ghetto was difficult and dangerous. From time to time the bandits harassed the ghetto inhabitants. They encroached into our lodgment and beat us mercilessly demanding money and valuables. On October 28ththe Gestapo ordered us to assemble on the Ghetto Street. All the inhabitants were forced to come. They chose some 200 people and enclosed them into the cinema local. Leading them on the walk to the cinema area was Yani Garber, the Judenrat Head. He was told that they are all taken to work. However they were all led by groups of ten to the adjacent sport square and shot to death. Zviya Lunin was among the conveyed to die, but she survived. The Nazis let her free. The quota, as they said, was completed. This time the German accuracy saved a Jewish life (not for long). After that “First Action” the ghetto area was reduced. Shneur Kivelevitsh was elected as the Judenrat Head.
Many months passed and then some tormenting news reached the ghetto. The Germans geared up for a new slaughter. Rivka Dratvitski's husband, a gentile, who was friendly with the Jews, brought the information. Thanks to him many people were saved. Sunday, May 10th, 1942, at five in the morning Shneur Kivelevitsh appeared in our home and told us that the ghetto is surrounded. He advised every one to hide. The Germans enclosed the ghetto and meticulously looked for the Jews. They killed on the spot those who were found and refused to expose friends or relatives hiding places. My brother Yehuda, Osher (Itshe Bers) Perski, his son Ruvke and I, decided to run away. We passed the Volozhynka stream near the bridge and concealed ourselves in a grove. Some local Christians chased us. We could hear them saying that they are looking for us.
When they left, I walked to Horodok; Osher Perski with his son to went to Zabrezhe. The Jews I met in the Horodok Ghetto were in a very agitated spirit. They just heard about the recent mass slaughter in Volozhyn.
After the “second Action” the Volozhyn authorities reduced the ghetto area and enclosed inside the remaining little group of Jews. They assured them that the rest would work and be safe. I believed this false promise and returned home. I worked with some Jewish girls, among them Miriam Kagan and Rachel from Mejeyk, in a carpenter's team. Our manager was Yezierski. Once, as we were ready to return to the ghetto, we realized that the Germans were surrounding the ghetto, and some Jews were running out of the gate. We threw away the yellow patches and looked for a place to hide. The Germans shot at us and killed ten girls. Miryam Kagan and I hid in a wheat field. At night we went in the Mejeyk direction. After a lot of wandering we arrived in the Kaldiki hamlet. We knocked at a peasant's door and implored him to give us some nourishment. We were swollen from hunger. Despite the fact that they were poor they shared their food with us. We walked through the hamlet and deciding that we have nothing to lose. We knocked at a door of another remote house. A peasant opened the door, led us into the adjacent barn and locked the door. After a couple of frightful hours the landlord opened the barn and invited us to his house. It was a single room house with two big beds, a broken table and an oven. Here lived the Righteous Gentile Ivan Kovalski with his family: wife, three daughters and two sons. This poor family received us cheerfully and with unusual warmth. They cried with tears seeing our wretched appearance. After we warmed our frozen bodies and had a hot meal, they equipped us with blankets and led us back to the barn.
It happened at Saturday evening, November 14th1942. On Sunday morning we were served with a breakfast. We left some food to take away, being sure that Kovalski will expel us. At noon he came in and seeing the food remnants he asked us “Why?”. We answered: “We are sure that you would not hide Jewish girls much longer. You are endangering the life of your entire family. For that reason we decided to go our way”. Kovalski, offended by our answer, said: “ Dear girls, my family and I, we decided to let you live with us. Your fate is our fate, our home is your home”.
It was a very cold winter. We froze in the barn. Kovalski, the good soul, invited us in his house to conceal us upon the oven. It was a not aired, a very hot place. Kovalski used to lead us every day for a couple of hours into the potatoes cellar to breath some air. The children cooperated with their parents, and at danger, they warned us with agreed signs. One day German soldiers encircled the Krazhina hamlet, some 500 meters from us. They assembled all the hamlet inhabitants, spilled kerosene, set fire and burned all of them. They did it as revenge. Some partisans killed Germans soldiers, and took their retreat through Krazhina. Kovalski was conscious of the danger that awaited him and us. But he did not abandon us, on the contrary, as a good softhearted father he calmed and encouraged us. However I had a premonition that we are in danger staying at this house. Partisans were very active in the near by area. Fights and shootings broke from time to time. The Kovalskis asked and begged us to stay. But we decided to go. Kovalski made some journeys in the surrounding communities looking for traces of the Partisans.
He found a troop of Partisans and brought us to them. They were hostile, suspecting us as agents of the German intelligence services. They arranged a quick trial and convicted us to death. Before the execution hour approached a Krazhina partisan asked us who we were and from where we came. When I told him my name, he informed me that my brother Yehuda Yosef Potashnik is serving as a partisan near by. The Krazhina partisan told his commander that I am a well-known partisan's sister and he tore the paper with the verdict. I was transferred with Mariyasha Kagan to Baksht. There were many active partisan units in the area. My brother Yehuda Yosef took me to the Lidayev partisan unit, in the Nalibok forest. After some days the Germans surrounded the entire area. We hid in pits and other hiding places. When they left we concentrated in an outlying corner of the Nalibok forests. We established there a winter camp in which we lived until the Volozhyn liberation. After the liberation we returned to Volozhyn. I went to see Kovalski. The relations between us tightened. He visited us every day. His son and daughter worked in town and dwelled in my house. In 1945 I left Volozhyn to Poland. In 1947 I made Aliya. All that time I wrote letters to Kovalski but I had no answers. In 1966 I received his address. Kovalski with his family lived in Ural. Without delay I sent him a vestments package. He confirmed with joy its reception and sent his thanks. Since then we correspond and I send him and his family members presents, thanking this noble man for saving my life.

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- Friday, June 20, 2003 at 18:57:37 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------ Bronia (Breine) nee Kur Rabinovitz Story
Breine is the daughter of Rivka, daughter of Alexander Volozhinski from Volozhin (Rivkas’ mother Mtya was from the Bunimovitz family of Volozhin). Breines’ father was Mordechai Kur who’s’ father was a well-respected scribe (writer of Torah books) in Vileyka; (Koor). Rabbi yakov Landu Z”L ABD bnai Brak wrote about Yehoshua Kur in the yizkor book for kurenets; ‘…Amongst the shoemakers I must tell about Moshe Kur the Shoemaker from Dolhinov Street. He was a spiritual Jew and would read with excitement from the Torah. He was also a Kadainov Hasid. His father was Reb Yeoshua, the writer from Vileyka. The son of Moshe, Shlomo Chaim studied Torah in our minyan, and when he arrived at the age where he would be taken to the army, he escaped and went to London. His last name was Koor and from what I heard he became a Hazan in one of the synagogues in London, where he later passed away…”* The parents of Breine came from very respected religious families and a matchmaker arranged their marriage as the custom of Jews in 1900. The relatives from the groom side said that Rivka did not come to the marriage with the appropriate dowry but she had other qualities to compensate for it. The oldest boy; Avraham was born in 1910, Eliezer was born in
He was “Tamid Chacham” a Yeshiva “Bachur”. A distant cousin; Arie Shevach remembers that there was a time when Eliezer had to serve in the Polish army c 1937. He was station near Krasne and the rabbi of Krasne ordered the family to prepare Kosher food for Eliezer and he would deliver it to Eliezer everyday. Arie was about 12 years old and was getting ready for his Bar Mitzva and Eliezer helped him with some of his studies.
Breine attended the TARBUT school in Horodok. All the subjects [other the mandatory class in the Polish language] were instructed in HEBREW. Breine also attended the tuition free Polish public school for a few years. .
After the Soviets took control of the area in September of 1939 and instituted a communist rule in the area Breine.'s oldest sister; Leyka, who owned a coffee store in Horodok knew that she would be classified unfavorably as ‘capitalist” so she moved to Vileyka. Vileyka, one of the region's main towns, became an important place for the Soviet municipal authorities and She worked for them.
When the German invaded the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941 The Soviet officers and official evacuated the area and crossed by trains the old border (the pre 1939 Poland/ Soviet union border) . Some of them insisted that Breine's sister, along with other Jews in the town who worked for the Soviets, left with them because they knew what the impending German invasion would mean for them. (in some cases the Soviet officials actually pushed Jews they encountered around town onto departing trains without leaving them a moment to return to their homes and families. One Jewish woman, Dora Rabinovitz told me that that she came to Vileyka to work that day wearing a light summer dress and, by chance, carrying a picture of her family in her pocket. She was pushed onto a train and sent to the cold of Russia for more then two years and was the only member of her family to survive E. D)
Breine.'s brother Eliezer was studying in a yeshiva in Poland. In 1939, when the area was given to the Soviets the whole yeshiva received illegally acquired papers from the Japanese ambassador, or assistant to the Japanese ambassador in Lithuania. With these papers, the residents of the yeshiva were allowed to immigrate to China before the German invasion. In China, Breine.'s brother contacted their other brother back in the area of Horodok who subsequently traveled all the way to China so as to bring him back to Poland, where he would later perish in German hands. (He might have never left for China, his brother might have taken him from Lithuania back to Horodok the Soviets would never let anyone without papers go all the way to China and back the papers were very very hard to obtain)
During the German occupation Breine and her family first went to a former Christian neighbor and asked him to hide them. However, because they had previously given him their possessions for safe keeping, he was loathe to the idea of saving those who may later ask for his newly acquired, albeit on loan, goods. So, when they asked to be let in, he threatened to kill them
.
Breine and the rest of the family escaped the killing in Horodok and came to the krasne ghetto. Most of the Jews in the krasne ghetto came from towns that were already annihilated. Every time before they annihilated a community, they chose a few Jews who could be useful and transferred them to Krasne. The place was chosen as a supply base for the Germans, where materiel was relayed to and from the front, including a large amount of weapons captured from the Soviets. Thousands of Jews worked in construction, in loading and unloading goods, and in other logistical support positions. Since the ghetto could not contain thousands of workers, the Germans established a labor camp, and they continuously brought Jews from neighboring towns after each action. As in other ghettoes and camps, there was a Jewish committee or Judenrat. At the head of the Krasne Judenrat was Shabtai Oryuk. During the First World War he had been a POW in Germany for a few years and learned to speak German fluently.
Shaptai Olyuk and the brothers of the Kaplan house, Yitzhak and Moshe.
. Breine and her family believed that working for the Germans will save them. She worked with other Jewish women and children to lay new train tracks. German soldiers routinely routed out and murdered Jews who were weaker or more feeble than the rest. The food given daily to the Jews who worked for the Germans consisted of one piece of bread with marmalade, and on occasion, a soup made from discarded potato peals. Often, the garbage of non-Jews was served to the Jews as food. Once, B. saw the German soldiers throw a live dog into the soup they were serving and then forced the Jews who had witnessed the event to eat the soup. At another time, a Jewish child returned to ask for an extra helping of soup. Instead of granting his request, the German soldiers put the child into the boiling soup. On one occasion, she spotted some moldy bread in the garbage and treasuring it, picked it out of the trash, eating a little and saving the rest for her family. Some German soldiers saw her and abused her for taking the bread.
There was one Jew from Horodak who would tell the Germans which Jews were wealthy, in hopes of being spared by the soldiers. Nevertheless, the German soldiers later killed him Breine and her family thought that the Germans needed them as workers so they worked very hard because they thought it would be their ticket to survive. At one point they realized that they should go into hiding in a hidden ditch they had dug for that purpose. Many Jews resorted to living in ditches to escape the Germans. The ditches varied in size - some holding five, others ten, and still others, up to twenty people. Often ditches were designated for different age, and gender groups. While they were in hiding in the ditch and fearful of the German soldiers they knew were near, one of the young girls (about 10 years old) in the ditch with B. and her family started crying for water. A man in the ditch started choking her to silence her. B. Prevented him from killing the girl by pushing him away and placing her hands over the girl's mouth. The young girl is now a doctor in the U.S..
They had large amounts of gold and while hiding out in the ditch, they decided that the best thing to do would be to offer the wealth to the Germans in return for a promise of security. B was on her way to deliver the gold and solicit such a promise when Zemitre, a Christian from the village, came to her and challenged the logic of her mission. He said, "Are you crazy? Why are you going back to them? They're killing everyone." He then took Breine to his barn and hid her in the area used for storing hay, where she remained for a week.
Breine's family didn't know what had happened to her after she left the ditch. Although everyone left the ditch while Breine was still missing, her family, because they were worried about her whereabouts returned to look for her. Tragically, her family was killed upon their return while the rest of the people who had left the ditch survived.
A neighbor of the Christian who had saved Breine had also taken the risk of hiding a fugitive Jew. When the other neighbors found out they attacked and killed him, and burnt down his house. After this incident, Breine's host was afraid and forced her to leave. For a time she hid where she could, moving from place to place, and eating what she could find, including grass and garbage.
One farmer who was out searching for eggs in his yard discovered Breine in hiding. He immediately knew who she must be. Terrified, she told him that she knew the location of a large quantity of gold and promised to lead him to it, should he chose to spare her from the Germans. The farmer told her to that he did not need her gold, he will help her but she must wait where she was and left since this occurred shortly after they sloutherred the Jews of Krasne many of the Jewish bodies were left in different areas were they were killed and the Germans were worried that disease would spread yet they did not want to touch the remains and all their Jewish slave workers were killed by them they ordered the local population to get rid of the budies and the man was ordered to do it. B. was certain that he had gone to fetch German soldiers. However, after ten minutes the farmer's wife appeared and offered B. a bowl of soup and a spoon. B. hadn't eaten in a long time, and ravished with hunger, drank the soup straight from the bowl. The farmer's wife cried to seeing her desperate condition.
Breine stayed with the farmer and his wife, living exclusively in their barn for one week. She remained in hiding in the barn because there were many Germans in the area. She was never allowed in the house. Later, they made her a nanny to their children, although she continued to sleep in the barn. Most of the neighbors were never aware of her because of the lengths that B. and the family went to in keeping her presence a secret.
Through rumors that had spread among the non-Jewish farming residents of the area, Isaac Noll, a Jewish member of the partisans, found out that there was a Jewish girl surviving alone in the area. (B. remarks that it was amazing that the residents had not yet turned her in). Isaac asked them where they could find her and they told her Maruska Kamarouski had her staying with him.
The partisans Months before the German troops began slaughtering the Jews in KRASNE, many young Jewish men realized what was about to transpire and escaped deep into the surrounding forest where they joined forces with partisan groups already established by Soviets, and especially former Soviet prisoners of war who had been treated as badly as the Jews under the Germans. Together, they began ambushing and killing German soldiers. Much of the local population was afraid of the partisans because the partisans made it clear that anyone found collaborating with the Germans would be killed.
When B. initially tried to join the partisans they would not accept her because she came empty handed. However, a younger first cousin of hers (his father was the brother of Breine's mother), Mayer Vol (previously known as Volojinski) ambushed a German and stole his weapon, which he then gave to B. so that she would be accepted in by the partisans. Now this cousin lives in Windsor, Canada.
Breine. returned armed to the partisans, who let her in, and Breine became a member of the Atriad Staritsky. This group of partisans hid out in the forest between the towns of Baranovic and Volozhin, remaining closer to latter. Breine stayed in the forest for one and half years. After staying for awhile with the partisans she came to understand that the Germans were losing the war because, for the first time, she had access to radio broadcasting, and in 1944 they began seeing Allied planes fly overhead.
Breine didn't fight with the partisans, but facilitated their goals in other ways, tending to the livestock and helping out with the cooking. After the war she received medals for her participation in the resistance, but hadn't killed anyone and so felt as though she didn't deserve them.
Breine felt that Jews and Soviets alike were treated equally within the partisan ranks and generally, got along well. She does recall one instance, however, when a Jew by the name of Fole Parovsky went to town to find food with two Soviets, and never returned. The two Soviets claimed he had been killed by German soldiers. However, one partisan by the name of Jaunsh didn't believe their story and started investigating only to find that the Soviets had killed Fole. The partisans had a trial and found one of the Soviets guilty. He was subsequently killed. Breine can only speculate on his motivation, but believes it may have been anti-Semitism. However, this was a rare case.
In the evenings, the partisans would make communal fires and sit around and sing together. They would sing so loudly and happily that Breine would be afraid that the German soldiers would find them. However, her cousin Isaac reassured her that they were too scared of the partisans to come to the forest that was controlled by the Russian partisans.
Once the partisans caught a German soldier. This particular German soldier was a special target of their anger because he carried with him numerous photographs of Jews he had killed, (They used to send the pictures to Germany) They ordered everyone to watch while they killed him. Breine covered her face, refusing to watch. However, her cousin chided her, telling her she was crazy to feel any sympathy to Germans who mercilessly killed so many Jews.
There was a woman named Yokha Rubenshik from Minsk who was a partisan member. When the Germans packed the Jews into train cars to be killed, she and her siblings where among those on the train. Yokha, realizing what their fate must be, pushed her younger brother out of the train. He eventually survived the war and became a dentist. She survived because she worked for the Germans and then escaped. Later, she joined the partisans and was sent by them back to Minsk where she recruited twelve more Jews. Together, this fugitive band removed their stars of David and escaped. However, while they were escaping a German soldier came by. Yokha approached him and spoke to him Russian, knowing that he would recognize her Yiddish accent if she spoke in German. She acted very self-assured and invited the German to eat with her. She emphasized that she had ham to eat and told him to meet her at a particular place and time later that evening. Meanwhile, the other Jews escaped.
Towards the end of the war, when the Germans were clearly losing, a boy from Minsk named Moshe managed to round up thirty Germans who thought they were surrendering and would be made POWs.
When the commanders told the partisans that the area was free of German troops, forty Jewish partisans decided to re-enter the city of Volozhin, the closest town. Upon returning they found that many homes and been burnt down and destroyed. Also, this town, previously famous for its large Jewish population had been repopulated by Christians. When the Christians saw that Jews were returning they began to weep and were afraid. However, the group of forty Jews were still scared to disband and live separately, and so they re-occupied only three houses in the town. Because there were so few Jews that had survived the war, this group of survivors became like family to one another.
It was while staying in this house that Breine met her husband to be. He had spent the war as a soldier in the Red Army in Russia, although he was originally from Breine's hometown of Horodok. As soon as he heard that his home region had been freed by the Red Army, he boarded a train and returned. When he had left for Russia he left behind a wife and two children, who were to perish in the Holocaust. His first wife's name was Blumke, she was a beautiful woman (one of her brothers survived the war and lives iin Israel). Because of her beauty, the Germans wanted to take her to work for them and send her children to be killed, but she insisted on accompanying her children. Everyone knew this story about Blumke and her children and so were able to tell her husband what had happened when they eventually met up with him upon his return.
Breine's future husband returned to find Christians living in his old house. As soon as they saw him, one of the Christians went to look for an axe with which to kill him. Understanding what they were about to do, Breine's future husband jumped out of a window in the house and went for the Soviet police. After this incident, he was too afraid to ask any Christians about what had happened to his family, and couldn't find any Jews in the town. However, he did eventually learn that there were a few Jews living in Volozhin.
When he arrived in Volozhin and met Bronia, he immediately asked her to marry him. Since Bronia had come from a religious family she had never looked at another man before him. After getting married they stayed in Volozhin for one year and began selling things from a horse and carriage. Breine's first son was born there. However, like all the other Jews living in Volozhin, Bronia and her husband wanted to leave.
All of a sudden, Breine's sister who had traveled on a train to Siberia before the German invasion, returned. Her sister had written a letter to a Christian neighbor named Yokobovsky inquiring about her family. Breine happened to return to Horodok with her husband to visit and was given the letter. She responded to her sister's letter from Kemarov, Siberia, writing that the rest of the family had died, but not to grieve because she was still alive. Upon getting the letter, her sister fainted and was taken to the hospital where she spent two months. After recovering, she returned to Volozhin with a Jewish man she had met in Siberia, and lived with Breine. and her husband.
Shortly after they arrived in Volozhin they decided to leave for Germany. From Germany they believed they would be able to travel to other countries. They had terrible associations with the town of Volozhin and the surrounding area and couldn't wait to leave. However, when they arrived in Germany they found themselves marooned in refugee camps for a year and a half, which, compared to other fellow refugees, was a short time. As refugees, however, they were allowed to stay in real homes and apartments, which had previously been inhabited by members of the SS.
Part of the problem was that no country wanted to accept them. Although they received free food and goods from the U.S., they were barred from emigrating there. B.'s husband said he didn't want to go to the U.S. anyway and preferred instead to move to Israel where he felt there would be more of an assurance that what had happened to them in Poland would not reoccur.
Eventually they were able to travel on a ship named the Queen Anna Maria to Israel. In Israel they lived first in a refugee camp named Binyamina in very difficult
conditions in tents. Later, they settled in Brandeis in Israel
I received emails form other members of the family; Dear Eilat
Wonderful to hear Breines story
My grandfather - Shlomo Hayim, son of Moshe and cousin of Breine had family both in England and in Russia
Shlomo Hayim had 4 children
Marie - married name Coleman - Stephen's mother
Henry- my father
Hanna - married name Mather
Lily/Leah- married name Broza
I moved to Israel from England about 25 years ago. I live in Efrat about 20 minutes from Jerusalem but work in Jerusalem and commute every day. I have an elder brother Shlomo who lives in Petach Tikva near Tel Aviv and a younger brother Jonathan who lives with my mother in Netanya. My parents came to Israel in 1983 to retire. My father passed away in 1988.
Danny Koor
Eilat
My cousin Danny Koor has been in contact with you, and has sent me all the details he has received from you so far.
We share the same grandfather Shlomo Chayim, or Solomon Koor as he was known in England. My late mother Marie, and Danny's late father Henry were brother and sister, together with 2 surviving sisters Hannah and Lily.
The family lived initially in the East End of London, moving to Notting Hill in the 1920's, where
my grandfather eventually became minister of Notting Hill Synagogue until he died in May 1946.

Stephen Coleman
.
.
- Friday, June 20, 2003 at 09:10:13 (PDT)
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Belarus SIG members attending the 23rd IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Washington D.C. (July 20-25, 2003)


So far, the following 85 people (or couples) have signed up
Name Towns Surnames
ATKINS, Harold Senno, Orsha, Upyna, Telsiai EITINGON, ATKINS, SEGAL
BELINKOFF, Adar Gomel BELINKOFF
BERG, Sandra Brest Litovski WANDER, ZILBERBERG, UNTERMAN
BISHOW, Marlene Wolpa, Ivye, Grodno GOLDSTEIN, PETT, SINGER
BOONIN, Harry Slutsk District ASSOFSKY, BERKOWITZ, TSIPALEYEV
BOXER, Judy Grodno WEINSTEIN
BRILL, David Usvyaty, Shklov BRIL\', LEVIN, ALEINIKOV
BROWN, Janet Slonim, Smorgon, Minsk, Pinsk TRILNI(C)K, MOLCHOTSKY,SMARGON,FRIEDLANDER
CARVER, Tina Soski, Minsk KAPLAN
CAUGHLAN, Jenny Suwalki, Ciechanowiec, Budapest, Nagy Oroszi, Becshke, Berlin KAUFER, STEINER, SOLL/SOLE, PHILLIPS/FILIPOWSKI, HEKSCH, LENGYEL, HAAS
COHEN, Jay Piaski, Volkovysk KAGAN, YEZERSKY, YERSZKI, JESIERSKI
COHODAS, Alvin Naroch CHODASH
DARDASHTI, Schelly Talalay Mogilev, All Belarus, All Russia, Worldwide TALALAY
DESHUR, Penny Minsk FONDILLER
D\'ALMEIDA, Franck Grodno, Vilnius ZOLTY
EASTON, Glenn Minsk EPSTEIN
EGAN, Shana Kobryn, Brest Litovsk, Kamenets, Divin, Bialystok RITZENBERG, DAITCH, KAPLAN, MESSYNG, SHAMES
EPSTEIN, Ruth+moshe Pinsk,korelitch,mir SAUBERMAN,SCHIFFMAN,OBRINSKY
FEARER, Mark Volozhin, Lyskava, Volkevysk, Ruzhany RAGOVIN, PINKAUSOVICH, CHERNICHOFF
FELDMAN, Rose Mscibow, Ruzhany, Kosovo EPSTEIN, BYARSKY, ILLIVITSKY (ELIVITSKY), KAPLAN
FIBEL, Harriet & Joseph Werenow, Radun OLKENITZKY
FINE, Ernie Minsk BAKSTANSKY, SLONIMSKY
FISHKIN, Jewel Bobruisk-Mintz-Volosyn-Olshony-Krasne FISHKIN-SKLUT-KAPLAN-WOLCHEK=MATLIN=BRUDNER
FOX, David Minsk, Mogilev TSIVIN, FEITELSON, SHENDEROV, RABINOWITZ
FOX, Judith KOENIG Korma, Bychov,Mogilev,Seletz GLICKLIN, KARASIK, BAEVSKY,WILENSKY,SCHNEERSON,PLOTKIN, YAMNITSKY
FRANKL, Rhea Borisov, Zembin, Lahoisk FEITELSON, BACHRACH, KATZMAN
GALLARD, Cindy Skrigalovo, Petrikov, Osovets,Romanovka LOBATCH
GLICKSBERG, Ruth Miedzyrzec,Wegrow,Warsaw,Pultusk GLICKSBERG,GLUCKSBERG
GOLDBERG, Nancy Minsk, Slutsk, Derbent ROSOVSKY, RUDEVITSKY, SCHAEFFER, GALENSON, LEVINE
GOLDSMITH, Judith Nesvizh, Taraspol, Chisinau STOLIAR, MIRMOVITCH, YATZKEVICH, LEIVOV
GOLDSMITH, Susan Novyy Sverzhen, Stolbtsy, Yasevich, Mir, Dolginovo TOBIAS, ROZANSKY, HOROWICZ, DROZNAN
GORDON, Judith Motol, Minsk, Pinsk SOKOLOV. KAHN, COHEN, NACHMAN, LURIA, SHAPIRO
GREENBERG, Roslyn Zirmuny, Lida, Voronovo, Divenishkes ROGATNICK, ZIRMUNSKY, KALMANOWITZ, MOLCHADSKY
GREENMAN, Linda Antopol GREENMAN, RESNICK
HANIT, Kevin Derechin, Baranovici, Ruzhany CHERVYATITSKY, ABELOVICH, KLETSKIN, LEVITT, GRACHUK
HENKIN, Hilary Mogilev, Orsha, Kopys GENKIN, BELIITSKI, BERLIN
HIRSCHHORN, Donald And Sandra Retchetsa, Berezeno PASSOV, RAFALCZECH
HIRSCHHORN, Donald Retchitsa Gomel PASSOFF,ITZKOOWITZ
HIRSCHHORN, Sandra Berezeno, Minsk, Igumen RAFALCHEK, KARPEI, PODOLNIK
HOLDEN, Nancy Myadel, Kobylnik, Mscibow, GORDON, KRIVITSKY, HORWITZ, KALER
HOLTZMAN, Alvin Pinsk, Galati, Dorohoi HOLTZMAN, PERLOW, GLOBERMAN, POLLACK, ZARITSKY, HOROVITZ, BRAUNSTEIN
KAPLAN, Rochelle Kopyl, Slutsk (belarus); Sambor, Vinnytsa, Brailov (ukraine); Riga, Bauska (latvia); Kraziai (lithuania); Piesk; KAPLAN, BREGMAN, RAPOPORT (BELARUS); SCHRECKINGER, KARP, APFELZUS, RICHTER (SAMBOR); GERSON (LATVIA); ZAKS (LITHUANIA); LIPSON, LERNER (VINNYTSA); LEBOWSKY, LUBOV (PIESK)
KARSEN, Mike Minsk Gubernia, Haradisht YNAKELOVICH, SHEPSOLOVICH
KROM, Harold Slutsk / Gomel BUNIN / TITINSKY
KRONGOLD, Judith Mir, Lubtch, Turets, Bielsk, Vladimir Volynsk WILENSKY, TREMBITSKY, BLOOM, KRONGOLD
LEVINE, Michael Logoysk, Smolivichi, Minsk LEVINE, RELYUSHCHIN, SEGALOWITZ, GOLDFARB
LEVY, Mike Slonim BUBLACKA, MINKOWICK
MARKEL, Beatrice Vileyka, Dalhinov, Vilna KAGAN,KAHAN,ZAPODNIK
MASLOV, Freya Blitstein Suchawolya, Grodno KRAMER, SOKOLSKY
MENDELOW, Aubrey Tsuraki, Starosselje AXELROD, HOROWITZ, KATZENELSON, KAZENELENBOGEN, EISENSTADT
MESHENBERG, Mike Nesvizh, Chomsk ZATURENSKY, TEVYANSKY, ELLMAN
MUSIKAR, Barbara Slonim, Kobrin, Brest SAMSONOWITZ, KLEMPNER,
NEMOY, Estelle Gomel GARELICK/GORELICK
NEUBAUER, Selma Oshmyany HOROWITZ AND BOSH
OKNER, Ben Borbruisk CHERTOV, RABKIN
OLKEN, Deb Werenow OLKENITZKY
PAULIN, Gladys Friedman Kalinkovichi, Bragin, Yurevichi, Tulgovichi, Mozyr MINEVICH, RAICHMAN, GUTMAN, RAZHEVSKY, LEVIK
PEARLMAN, SUSAN Bialystok, Minsk, Porozowa, Szereszewo, Wolpa SZEJNMAN, JASKOLKA, MALETSKY, KOSLOVSKY, WISHNIATSKY, PEARLMAN
POLLERO, Shelley Kobrin, Vitebsk TENENBAUM, KAGAN, LEKHERZAK
POSNICK, Mike Budslavy, Dolginovo, Drogiczn, Kobrin, Kopyl, Minsk, Mir, Novyy Sverzhen, Timkovichi EHRLICH, FRIEDMAN, GOLOVENCHITS, KOSOWSKY, POZNIAK, ROZIN, SHERMAN, SHULKIN, SZTEYNBERG, ZELEVYANSKY
REDLICH, Rita Svir SYKEN
RHODE, Harold Dolginovo, Vileika Uyezd AXELROD, RUBIN, SHUMAN
RILEY, Gayle Minsk, Timikovichi, Uslion LEVIN, GARFINKEL, COHEN,SAHAPIRO
ROCK, Jeffrey Bereza, Bluden, Brest ROG, ROCK
ROSENBAUM, Edward Lunna, Porozovo, Slonim, Sverzhen AGINSKI, BELLER, GRUNDFAST, GRUNDFEST, SILVERBLATT
ROSOW, Emma Haradok, Rudnya MINKOFF, GUSINSKY
RUBENSTEIN, Herbert Vitebsk LEVIT
SALTMAN, Joanne Slonim, Kozlovshchina, Lida SALT(Z)MAN, MISHKIN, EPSTEIN, ZLOTNIK
SANDLER, Michelle Borisov MEBEL, KLEBENOFF
SASLAFSKY, Jennifer Slutsk, Barbruisk KOMISAR
SCHNEIDER, Jerry Pinsk AIZENBERG, ELSTEIN
SCHWARTZBERG, Jenny Antopol, Motol, Seletz, Drogichin, Baranovici, Turetz KAPLAN, KAMENETZKY, TELECHANSKY, ADLER, PLOTNITZKY, SHEDROVITZKY, SHERESHEVSKY, WALDMAN, KANTOROWITZ, MOSKOWITZ
SHAPIRO, Sandra Garfinkel Divin, Kobryn, Kortylisy, Chernyany, Dobryanka, Podobryanka GARFINKEL, TENENBAUM,KLYN, LEVY, GOLDSMITH, KRASELSKY, LITVINSKI,
SIMON, Andrea Volchin, Brest MIDLER, LEW
SMITH, Lester Gudegai, Zhuprany, Oshmina, SHUMELISKY, DAVIDSON
SPECTOR, Joel Chashniki, Lepel, Shklov ZEITLIN, BLACK, BLECHMAN, SKIBINSKI
STEPAK, Ellen Pinsk BRENN, POSENITSKY, NIEMCOWIC
SUBER, Gordon Bobruysk, Omelyna, Tchedrin ZUBER, ZILBERMAN
TUERK, Janis Khomsk, Serniki Pervyye, Glussk SILBERKVEIT,TURKIENICH,KAGAN
WEIN, Joseph Bialystok FINKELSTEIN WEIN
WEINER, Stephanie Smorgon, Bobruisk CHODOSH, WEINER, LACOWITSKY
WILNAI, Ruth Rakow, Wolma, Iventes LIFSHITZ, ROTHSTEIN
WOLRAICH, Debra Motol, Ivanovo, Bobruisk, Pinsk RATNOWSKY, WARSHOVSKY, VALINSKY, ABRAMOWICZ, SLEPOY
ZERDIN, Keith Minsk, Vilani, Preili, Varaklani, Dvinsk ZHERDIN, PRESMA, KODIS, KODISH, KAIDAN, MEDNICOV, ZAVADSKI, TOBOVITCH
ZIESELMAN, Paula Kamenets, Verkholesye(?) WEISBERG, SPELKE
.
- Friday, June 20, 2003 at 06:41:48 (PDT)
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Dear Debbi,
Krasne is a name of a shtetl in today Belarus. The name Isacson was very common in a near by shtetl; Radoshkovichi. Jason Alpert (in New York city) must be a relative of yours. It is his family tree. almost the entire family came from the Vileyka/ Kurenets/ Krasne/ Horodok/ radoshkovichi area.[between Minsk and Vilnius) and setteled in Maine.
you wrote;
Joseph Graffman, who was married to Annie Issacson in Aurburn Maine, was my granfather.
is it her?;Annie (Elka) ISAACSON-GRAFFMAN (b. ~~1870; bur. 1955 in AUBURN,MAINE)
-- 1st husband: Samuel (Yehoshua) ISAACSON (d. 5/13/04)
Keith Graffman.
2nd husband (of Annie/Elka ISAACSON-GRAFFMAN): Joseph L.
(Hebrew name;Yosef-Yehuda son of Mordechai-Eliezer) GRAFFMAN (died 1/23/33)
Keith GRAFFMAN (wife: Bertha) (FLORIDA & SKOWHEGAN,MAINE)Born 7 Apr 1909 Died 23 Jul 2002 Issued: ME (1952)
SON (CALIFORNIA)
Deborah (KENTUCKY) You?
Bernard ("Benny") GRAFFMAN (1st wife: *, d.) (FLORIDA & SKOWHEGAN,MAINE) Bernard Graffman, (D - 1998)
DAUGHTER (BOSTON,MA)
-- wife: sister of Keith's wife Bertha from Ancestry.com;
Graffman, Hyman Age: 34 Year:1920
Birthplace: Poland Roll: T625_353 Race: White Page: 14A
State: Illinois ED: 2139 County: Cook Image: 0949 Township: Chicago
Graffman, Abe Age: 28 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_354 Race: White Page: 17A State: Illinois ED:
2145 County: Cook Image: 0035 Township: Chicago
Graffman, Jewell Age: 35 Year:1920 Birthplace: Illinois Roll:
T625_303 Race: White Page: 2B State: Illinois ED: 21 County: DeKalb Image:
0062 Township: De Kalb Graffman, David Age: 35 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll: T625_620
Race: Mulatto Page:3B State: Louisiana ED: 84 County: Orleans Image:
0909 Township: New Orleans
Graffman, Augusta Age: 59 Year:1920 Birthplace: Missouri Roll:
T625_954 Race: White Page: 1B State: Missouri ED: 212 County: St Louis (Independent City) Image: 0439 Township: St Louis
Graffman, August Age: 32 Year:1920 Birthplace: Missouri Roll: T625_948
Race: White Page: 4A State: Missouri ED: 86 County: St Louis (Independent City) Image: 0928 Township: St Louis
Graffman, Isadore Age: 33 Year:1920 Birthplace: New York Roll:
T625_1136 Race: White Page: 3A State: New York ED: 256 County: Bronx Image:0674 Township: Bronx
Graffman, David Age: 39 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:T625_1153
Race: White Page: 23B State: New York ED: 342 County: Kings Image:
0645 Township: Brooklyn
Graffman, Adolph Age: 22 Year:1920 Birthplace: Texas Roll: T625_1476
Race: White Page: 11B State: Oklahoma ED: 115 County: Okmulgee Image:
0752 Township: Henryetta
Graffman, Reuben Age: 45 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_1519 Race: White Page: 4A State: Pennsylvania ED: 356
County: Allegheny Image:0459 Township: Pittsburgh
Graffman, William B Age: 75 Year:1920 Birthplace: Pennsylvania Roll:
T625_1548 Race: White Page: 9A State: Pennsylvania ED: 12
County: Centre Image: 0836 Township: Milesburg
Grafman, I W Age: 55 Year:1920 Birthplace: England Roll: T625_81 Race: White Page: 2A State: Arkansas ED: 136 County: Sebastian Image:
0983 Township: Jim Fork Graffman, Lonel Age: 22 Year:1930 Birthplace: Texas Roll:
T626_2342 Race: White Page: 2A State: Texas ED: 26
County: Harris Image: 0819 Township: Houston Relationship: Brother-in-law
Graffman, James Age: 30 Year:1930 Birthplace: Texas Roll: T626_204
Race: White Page: 19B State: California ED: 272 County: San Francisco Image: 0797 Township: San Francisco Relationship: Son-in-law
Graffman, Marie Age: 32 Year:1930 Birthplace: Sweden Roll: T626_1560
Race: White Page: 3A State: New York ED: 517 County: New York Image:
0676 Township: Manhattan Relationship: Roomer
Graffman, Irma Age: 24 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll: T626_204 Race: Page:
19B State: California ED: 272 County: San Francisco Image: 0797
Township: San Francisco Relationship: Daughter
Graffman, Verle Age: 2 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll: T626_204
Race: Page: 19B State: California ED: 272 County: San Francisco Image: 0797 Township: San Francisco Relationship: Granddaughter
Graffman, Hyman Age: 46 Year:1930 Birthplace: Poland Roll: T626_452
Race: White Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 832 County: Cook Image:
0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Head
Graffman, Jennie Age: 45 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:
T626_452 Race: Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 832
County: Cook Image: 0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Wife
Graffman, Betty Age: 23 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:T626_452
Race: Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 832 County: Cook Image:
0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Daughter
Graffman, Eddie Age: 21 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll: T626_452
Race: Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 832 County: Cook Image:
0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Son
Graffman, Joe Age: 19 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:
T626_452 Race: Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 832 County: Cook Image:
0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Son
Graffman, Manny Age: 16 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:
T626_452 Race: Page: 1A State: Illinois ED: 32
County: Cook Image: 0894 Township: Chicago Relationship: Son
Graffman, Max Age: 40 Year:1930 Birthplace: Russia Roll: T626_466
Race: White Page: 26B State: Illinois ED: 1157 County: Cook Image:
0176 Township: Chicago Relationship: Head
Graffman, Mary Age: 39 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:
T626_466 Race: Page: 26B State: Illinois ED: 1157
County: Cook Image: 0176 Township: Chicago Relationship: Wife
Graffman, Hyman Age: 13 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll:
T626_466 Race: Page: 26B State: Illinois ED: 1157 County: Cook Image:
0176 Township: Chicago Relationship: Son
Graffman, Fred Age: 10 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll: T626_466 Race: Page:
26B State: Illinois ED: 1157 County: Cook Image: 0176 Township: Chicago
Relationship: Son Graffman, Hilda Age: 7 Year:1930 Birthplace: Roll: T626_466
Race: Page: 26B State: Illinois ED: 1157 County: Cook Image: 0176
Township: Chicago Relationship: Daughter


ANDREW H GRAFFMAN
SSN 176-18-9999 Residence:
19124 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Born 3 Sep 1918 Last Benefit:

Died 21 Jan 1997 Issued:
PA (Before 195)

BENJAMIN GRAFFMAN
SSN 184-07-1982 Residence: Born 24 May 1908 Last Benefit:

Died Mar 1965 Issued:
PA (Before 195)

BERNARD GRAFFMAN SSN 004-24-2950 Residence: 04976 Skowhegan, Somerset, ME Born 2 Dec 1912 Last Benefit:
Died Jan 1987 Issued: ME (Before 195)

EDYTHE GRAFFMAN SSN 065-07-3735 Residence: 21044 Columbia, Howard, MD
Born 7 Feb 1907 Last Benefit:

Died 1 May 1997 Issued:
NY (Before 195)

EMMA F GRAFFMAN SSN 454-20-8664 Residence: 78664 Round Rock, Williamson, TX Born 4 Dec 1910 Last Benefit: Died 6 Jan 1999 Issued:
TX (Before 195)
EMMA GRAFFMAN SSN 549-21-1059 Residence: 94596 Walnut Creek, Contra Costa, CA Born 22 Jul 1895 Last Benefit: Died Oct 1978 Issued:
CA (1973)
FAY GRAFFMAN SSN 159-03-7665 Residence: 19103 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Born 5 May 1912 Last Benefit: Died Oct 1987 Issued:
PA (Before 195)

GILBERT GRAFFMAN SSN 444-10-4772 Residence: 74437 Henryetta, Okmulgee, OK Born 4 Jun 1920 Last Benefit: 74437 Henryetta, Okmulgee, OK
Died Oct 1979 Issued: OK (Before 195)
IRMA GRAFFMAN SSN 547-38-4665 Residence:
Born 26 Feb 1906 Last Benefit:
Died 25 Jun 1990 Issued:
CA (Before 195)

JAMES GRAFFMAN
SSN 549-14-7637 Residence:
94596 Walnut Creek, Contra Costa, CA
Born 11 Aug 1889 Last Benefit:

Died 2 Jun 1992 Issued:
CA (Before 195) JOHN GRAFFMAN
SSN 465-05-0804 Residence: Born 15 Jan 1918 Last Benefit:

Died Jun 1959 Issued:
TX (Before 195)

JOSEPH GRAFFMAN
SSN 093-10-3857 Residence:
10023 New York, New York, NY
Born 20 Dec 1892 Last Benefit:

Died Aug 1980 Issued:
NY (Before 195)

KEITH GRAFFMAN SSN 004-34-5920 Residence: 34990 Palm City, Martin, FL Born 7 Apr 1909 Last Benefit: Died 23 Jul 2002 Issued:
ME (1952)
LILLIAN GRAFFMAN SSN 210-34-3030 Residence: 19103 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Born 1 Mar 1908 Last Benefit: 19103 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Died Aug 1978 Issued: PA (1961 And 1)

LILLIAN GRAFFMAN SSN 073-42-5025 Residence: 10023 New York, New York, NY Born 20 Mar 1902 Last Benefit: Died 27 Dec 1988 Issued:
NY (1966)
MAX J GRAFFMAN SSN 189-16-3440 Residence: 33445 Delray Beach, Palm Beach, FL Born 10 Mar 1909 Last Benefit: Died 21 May 1989 Issued:
PA (Before 195o)
NADINE GRAFFMAN SSN 118-28-6830 Residence: 10019 New York, New York, NY Born 1 Apr 1901 Last Benefit: Died 27 Jul 1989 Issued:
NY (1952 And 1)
VLADIMIR GRAFFMAN SSN 061-16-4320 Residence: 10028 New York, New York, NY Born 21 Jun 1891 Last Benefit:
Died Dec 1976 Issued:
NY (Before 195)

WILHELM GRAFFMAN
SSN 590-59-9435 Residence: 72 Born 17 Aug 1935 Last Benefit:

Died 24 Oct 2001 Issued: FL (1996)
Surname Given Name Middle Name Sex Birth Date Death Date Birth Place Death Place Social Security # Mother's Maiden Name Father's Surname
GRAFFMAN EMMA MARGARETH FEMALE 22 Jul 1895 6 Oct 1978 CALIFORNIA CONTRA COSTA 549211059
GRAFFMAN IRMA BEATRICE FEMALE 26 Feb 1906 25 Jun 1990 CALIFORNIA SONOMA 547384665 PURPOLI WOLFF
GRAFFMAN JAMES MALE 16 Jun 1899 4 Apr 1942 TEXAS SAN FRANCISCO 557035588 TITSWORTH GRAFFMAN
GRAFFMAN JAMES O MALE 11 Aug 1889 2 Jun 1992 ILLINOIS CONTRA COSTA 549147637
Certificate: 0
Bride: Murphy Reta M
Bride's Place of Residence: Calais
Bride's State of Residence: ME
Groom: Graffman Bernard D
Groom's Place of Residence: Houlton
Groom's state of Residence: ME
Date: 13 June, 1939
Graffman, Bernard D
Death Date: January 1, 1987 Age:
74
Town: Skowhegan Certificate:
8700195
Certificate: 8603156
Bride: Hall Jennifer L
Bride's Place of Residence: Unknown
Bride's State of Residence: MA
Groom: Graffman Peter A
Groom's Place of Residence: Skowhegan
Groom's state of Residence: ME
Date: 14 June, 1986 Grafman, Alec Age: 20 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_329 Race: White Page: 4A State: Illinois ED: 1058
County: Cook Image: 0616 Township: Chicago
Grafman, David Age: 27 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_329 Race: White Page: 3B
State: Illinois ED: 1058
County: Cook Image: 0615 Township: Chicago
Grafman, Henry Age: 44 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_354 Race: White Page: 8B State: Illinois ED:
2147 County: Cook Image: 0082 Township: Chicago
Grafman, Harry Age: 24 Year: 1920 Birthplace: England Roll:
T625_354 Race: White Page: 9B State: Illinois ED:
2170 County: Cook Image: 0761 Township: Chicago
Grafman, Jacob Age: 40 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia;Poland Roll: T625_319 Race: White Page: 17A State: Illinois ED: 630 County: Cook Image: 0189 Township: Chicago
Grafman, Max Age: 31 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia;Poland Roll: T625_325 Race: White Page: 17B State: Illinois ED: 892 County: Cook Image: 0452 Township: Chicago
Grafman, May Age: 45 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Indiana Roll: T625_461 Race: White Page: 1A State: Indiana ED: 153 County: Steuben Image: 0282 Township: Fremont
Grafman, Abraham Age: 40 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_818 Race: White Page: 10B State: Michigan ED:
604 County: Wayne Image: 0619 Township: Detroit
Grafman, Barnard Age:41 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll: T625_802 Race: White Page: 1A State: Michigan ED: 76 County: Wayne Image: 0478 Township: Detroit
Grafman, Abbie Age: 61 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Michigan Roll:
T625_833 Race: White Page: 8B State: Minnesota ED:
6 County:Hennepin Image: 0606 Township: Minneapolis
Grafman, Peter Age: 35 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Austria Roll:
T625_855 Race: White Page: 7B State: Minnesota ED:
97 County: Ramsey Image: 0298 Township: Saint Paul
Grafman, Walter L Age: 24 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Oklahoma Roll: T625_923 Race: White Page: 5A State: Missouri ED: 26 County: Jackson Image: 1079 Township:Kansas City
Grafman, Loretto Age:16 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Kansas Roll:
T625_925 Race: White Page: 13A State: Missouri ED: 74 County: Jackson Image: 1022 Township: Kansas City
Grafman, Saul Age: 47 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia;Vilna Roll:
T625_1182 Race: White Page: 17A State: New York ED:
1512 County: Kings Image: 0985 Township: Brooklyn
Grafman, Domenick Age: 33 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Italy Roll:
T625_1568 Race: White Page: 4B State: Pennsylvania ED: 22 County: Fayette Image: 0595 Township: Dunbar
Grafman, Joe Age: 42 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_1615 Race: White Page: 11B State: Pennsylvania ED: 49 County: Philadelphia Image: 0024 Township: Philadelphia
Grafman, Pauline Age:36 Year:1920 Birthplace: Germany Roll: T625_1905 Race:White Page: 15 A State:Virginia ED: 171 County:Portsmouth (Independent City) Image: 0522 Township: Portsmouth
Grafman, Henry Age: 33 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia;Poland Roll: T625_1997 Race: White Page: 14A State: Wisconsin ED: 29 County: Milwaukee Image: 1061 Township: Milwaukee
Grafman, Josip Age: 34 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Wisconsin Roll:
T625_2007 Race: White Page: 3B State: Wisconsin ED:
175 County: Oconto Image: 1071 Township: Oconto Falls
.
- Monday, June 16, 2003 at 21:13:17 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was surfing the web for my ancestors. Joseph Graffman, who was married to Annie Issacson in Aurburn Maine, was my granfather. I was directed to your web site entitled Krasne. I am not familiar with this name but when I scrolled through it I found many of my relatives.. My name is Debra. My father was Keith Graffman.
I would be interested in finding out more about my heritage

Thanks
Debby
.
- Monday, June 16, 2003 at 19:23:51 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hi there, I found this site by accident, but I'm glad I did. I really enjoyed it. best of luck to you!
Krieg
USA - Sunday, June 15, 2003 at 13:34:05 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Though the most visible function of the United States Secret Service is guarding the President of the United States, the Service is also involved
in the investigation and prosecution of various banking and counterfeiting crimes. You can help the Secret Service by forwarding all "African scam" type spams, with full headers, to 419.fcd@usss.treas.gov

investigation and prosecution of various banking and counterfeiting crimes. <419.fcd@usss.treas.gov>
- Sunday, June 15, 2003 at 08:52:03 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
PLEASE KEEP OFF NWA BIAFRA
GUYMAN <GUYMAN@MUGU.COM>
LOME, XS NIGERIA - Sunday, June 15, 2003 at 08:04:25 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Haskara meeting. 61 years since the extermination of the Jewish community of Dolhinov.
A memorial ( Haskara ) meeting for the Jews of Dolhinov who
were massacred by the Nazis and their colleborators will be
held in Tel-Aviv, Yehudit Ave. 30 at Beit Vilna on the 18.6.03 at 18.00 PM.
The Dolhinov Committee in Israel <rubinlj@netvision.net.il>
- Friday, June 13, 2003 at 07:28:15 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim Maizel 1821- 1912; Born in Horodok,was rabbi of Horodok from 1840 to 1843. Later rabbi of Drazin 1843-1861, Prozan 1861- 1867were he showed heroic dedication during a deadly epidemic, Lomza.1867-1879 were he was able to reduce by 500 a year the number of people called for army service. Was Chief Rabbi of Lodz from 1873 until his death in Lodz. He greatly cared about the social- economical predicament of his people. When the Jewish factory workers in lodge were replaced by none Jews he financed his on factory and hired only Jews He had a plan to establish an agricultural ranch to train Jews for immigrating to Israel [influenced by Rabbi Shmuel Maholiver] but it was met by opposition.
During his time no poor Jewish kids were kidnapped in the area to serve in the Russian army. He helped other communities with money to release people. He build an orphanage, old home, Jewish hospital,
And Talmud Torah schools. He helped thousands of Jews who came for many communities to receive his help.he would pawned all his possessions to help others. Despite of the fact that he often came to the non Jewish authorities with requests he was liked and respected by them. he worked diligently until the age of ninety. Many great tales were told about his greatness. And when he passed away many mornd him as if they became orphaned. A Yiddish book was written about him in 1925, For 15 years since his death [title memoir with his name in Yiddish].
From the internet;
Rav Eliyahu Chaim Meisels, the Rav of Lodz, would raise money for the poor widows and orphans of his city. During one particularly freezing winter, he went to visit one of the prominent members of his community, Reb Isaac, a banker who served as the president of the community council.
Bundled in a coat and scarf, the Rabbi approached the banker's mansion and knocked on the door.
The valet who answered the door was shocked to see the great Rabbi Meisels standing outside in the bitter cold. He immediately asked him to enter the home where he said there would be a hot tea waiting.
Rabbi Meisels refused. "It is not necessary. Please tell Reb Isaac to see me by the door."
The banker heard that the Rav was waiting near the portal and rushed in his evening jacket to greet him. Upon seeing the Rabbi standing in the frigid weather, he exclaimed. "Rebbe, please step inside. I have the fireplace raging, and my butler will prepare a hot tea for you! There is no need for you to wait outside!"
"That's alright," countered Reb Eliyahu Chaim. "It won't be long, and all I need could be accomplished by talking right here. I'm sure you won't mind. Anyway, why should I dirty your home with my snow-covered boots?"
By this time, Reb Isaac was in a dilemma. The frigid air was blowing into his house. He did not want to close the door and talk outside in the cold, and yet the Rabbi did not want to enter!
"Please, Rabbi, I don't know about you, but I am freezing," cried the banker. "I don't mind if your boots are wet! Just come on in!"
But the Rabbi did not budge, He began talking about the plight of some the unfortunate members of the community as the bankers teeth chattered in response.
"Please, Rebbe, just tell me what you need! I'll give anything you want, just come inside!”
With that, Reb Elya Chaim relented. He entered the man's home and followed him to the den, where a blazing fire heated the room. Then he began: "I need firewood for 50 families this winter." The banker smiled. “No problem, I commit to supplying the wood. Just one question. You know I give tzedoka, so why did you make me stand outside?”
"Reb Isaac," smiled Reb Eliyahu Chaim. "I know you give, but I wanted to make sure you understood what these poor people are going through. I knew that five minutes in the freezing cold would give you a different perspective than my initial asking while basking in the warmth of your fireplace."
The Chasam Sofer explains that because Levi was a special tribe of teachers and leaders it could be possible they would be aloof. Thus, though they were counted separately, they could not be above the crowd. Therefore, the Torah's command was stated in clear terms, "their heads you shall not lift (v'es rosham lo sisah) among the Children of Israel". Leadership may put you in a class by yourself, but remember, says the Torah, you must not feel that you are above the folk. You cannot bask in warmth while you are oblivious to those who suffer in the cold. Your head can not be "lifted" from among the children of Israel.
©2000 Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky In the city of Lodz, the large industrial city in Poland, Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim zs"l would routinely be honored with the third "aliyah." The judges, elders of the community and town dignitaries would generally receive the sixth aliyah to the Torah. The "maftir" aliyah was reserved for hatanim and those who were observing the anniversary of the passing of a relarelative. The rest of the aliyot were, of course, distributed among the other worshippers. Needless to say, this system fell far from avoiding all strife and tension. On one week two people would be observing days of memorial, on another Shabbat the community would be celebrating both a wedding and a bar-missvah, etc. Unquestionably, the lives of the "gabbaim" in the large Bet Kenesset of Lodz were not easy.Once, however, there occurred an incident which was, by any standard, exaggerated.A certain ignorant, ill-mannered man gradually worked his way up the economic ladder and eventually became among the wealthier members of the community. He was proud of his fortune and proceeded to flaunt his wealth. He affixed a gold "atarah" to his tallit, he purchased a respectable seat by the eastern wall of the Bet Kenesset for a huge sum of money, and, one day, he turned to the gabbai and said, "This Shabbat I am celebrating a birthday.""May you live a long, happy and healthy life," answered the gabbai innocently."Thank you. I want to receive an aliyah," continued the wealthy man."It would be an honor," responded the gabbai, "but just know that someone is commemorating the memorial day for his relative, so he will receive 'maftir.'""No problem," assured the arrogant aristocrat. "The sixth aliyah is good enough for me.""But this Shabbat is the turn of the old judge," noted the gabbai. "I will call you for the fifth aliyah, like I always have.""Don't you dare!" warned the wealthy man sternly, his furious eyes flashing like lightening. "You better not insult me this way. You will give me the sixth aliyah, and no other aliyah!"Threats could never frighten the old gabbai. And so, when the fifth aliyah came around, he called the name of the wealthy man. The latter stood up from his seat by the eastern wall and approached the bimah. Only instead of stopping by the Torah to recite the berachot, he continued to the gabbai and forcefully punched him across the face. One can only imagine the turmoil which ensued in the Bet Kenesset - shouts, insults, name-calling and fiery spirits.Needless to say, such an incident can in no way be ignored. After Shabbat, the infuriated gabbaim went to the rabbi's home to decide upon a proper response. One thing was absolutely clear: things cannot continue in this way."Of course," agreed the rabbi. "So what do you suggest?"The gabbai which was hit stood up and raised an amazing proposal: to do away with all "kibbudim," to eliminate the procedure of honoring people with the various aliyot and other parts of the service, thus removing the root of all the ill-will and strife. The gabbai was well-stocked with dozens of examples where someone was insulted, another was hurt, how one individual needed to be asked forgiveness, the other needed to be appeased somehow - the standard headaches suffered by gabbaim throughout the years, in every community. What would be simpler than simply deciding to eliminate this entire system and decide once and for all that all aliyot are to be considered of equal stature? The distribution would be conducted randomly, and peace will finally be restored to the communities heretofore stricken by strife and dissent.The idea sounded great. Everybody focused their attention on the rabbi sitting at the head of the table, waiting for him to give his stamp of approval to the proposal at hand.The rabbi finally spoke up. "It certainly sounds like a good idea. No, a terrific idea. Yet, I cannot accept it."They didn't understand.The rabbi explained, "As you of course realize, it is a tragedy when people come to the Bet Kenesset looking just for honor. But it would be even worse if people would stop looking for honor in the Bet Kenesset."Indeed, for good reason Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim Maizel was called "Hakima D'Yehudai," the wisest among the Jews. Certainly, the seeking of honor - not to mention the pursuit of honor - is a trait to be discouraged. But, what can we do? Everyone (except us, of course) are stricken by this negative characteristic, to one extent or another. Perhaps they won't always call it honor. Maybe they'll refer to it as recognition, dignity, a show of appreciation, what have you. If this drive is not channeled in the direction of the Bet Kenesset, people will seek and find honor in all other walks of life. They will find it in large measure in all types of groups and other organizations. It is therefore preferable that the groups and organizations in which they look for honor are part of the system of the Bet Kenesset, that in this structure people satisfy their need for recognition and distinction. To the contrary, by seeking honor specifically in the context of the Bet Kenesset, an individual makes the strong statement that therein he finds his social circle, that particularly in the religious service he looks for appreciation. This will give him impetus to contribute from his time, energies, talents and money to the sacred institution of the Bet Kenesset.
http://216.239.53.100/custom?q=cache:HvTlFULcZRkJ:www.shemayisrael.co.il/parsha/aram/archives/vayesh59.htm++rabbi+maizel&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 .
- Monday, June 09, 2003 at 20:04:48 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim Maizel 1821- 1912; Born in Horodok ;was rabbi of Horodok from 1840 to 1843. Later rabbi of Drazin 1843-1861, Prozan 1861- 1867were he showed heroic dedication during a deadly epidemic, Lomza.1867-1879 were he was able to reduce by 500 a year the number of people called for army service. Was Chief Rabbi of Lodz from 1873 until his death in Lodz. He greatly cared about the social- economical predicament of his people. When the Jewish factory workers in lodge were replaced by none Jews he financed his on factory and hired only Jews He had a plan to establish an agricultural ranch to train Jews for immigrating to Israel [influenced by Rabbi Shmuel Maholiver] but it was met by opposition.
During his time no poor Jewish kids were kidnapped in the area to serve in the Russian army. He helped other communities with money to release people. He build an orphanage, old home, Jewish hospital,
And Talmud Torah schools. He helped thousands of Jews who came for many communities to receive his help.he would pawned all his possessions to help others. Despite of the fact that he often came to the non Jewish authorities with requests he was liked and respected by them. he worked diligently until the age of ninety. Many great tales were told about his greatness. And when he passed away many mornd him as if they became orphaned. A Yiddish book was written about him in 1925, For 15 years since his death [title memoir with his name in Yiddish].
From the internet;
Rav Eliyahu Chaim Meisels, the Rav of Lodz, would raise money for the poor widows and orphans of his city. During one particularly freezing winter, he went to visit one of the prominent members of his community, Reb Isaac, a banker who served as the president of the community council.
Bundled in a coat and scarf, the Rabbi approached the banker's mansion and knocked on the door.
The valet who answered the door was shocked to see the great Rabbi Meisels standing outside in the bitter cold. He immediately asked him to enter the home where he said there would be a hot tea waiting.
Rabbi Meisels refused. "It is not necessary. Please tell Reb Isaac to see me by the door."
The banker heard that the Rav was waiting near the portal and rushed in his evening jacket to greet him. Upon seeing the Rabbi standing in the frigid weather, he exclaimed. "Rebbe, please step inside. I have the fireplace raging, and my butler will prepare a hot tea for you! There is no need for you to wait outside!"
"That's alright," countered Reb Eliyahu Chaim. "It won't be long, and all I need could be accomplished by talking right here. I'm sure you won't mind. Anyway, why should I dirty your home with my snow-covered boots?"
By this time, Reb Isaac was in a dilemma. The frigid air was blowing into his house. He did not want to close the door and talk outside in the cold, and yet the Rabbi did not want to enter!
"Please, Rabbi, I don't know about you, but I am freezing," cried the banker. "I don't mind if your boots are wet! Just come on in!"
But the Rabbi did not budge, He began talking about the plight of some the unfortunate members of the community as the bankers teeth chattered in response.
"Please, Rebbe, just tell me what you need! I'll give anything you want, just come inside!”
With that, Reb Elya Chaim relented. He entered the man's home and followed him to the den, where a blazing fire heated the room. Then he began: "I need firewood for 50 families this winter." The banker smiled. “No problem, I commit to supplying the wood. Just one question. You know I give tzedoka, so why did you make me stand outside?”
"Reb Isaac," smiled Reb Eliyahu Chaim. "I know you give, but I wanted to make sure you understood what these poor people are going through. I knew that five minutes in the freezing cold would give you a different perspective than my initial asking while basking in the warmth of your fireplace."
The Chasam Sofer explains that because Levi was a special tribe of teachers and leaders it could be possible they would be aloof. Thus, though they were counted separately, they could not be above the crowd. Therefore, the Torah's command was stated in clear terms, "their heads you shall not lift (v'es rosham lo sisah) among the Children of Israel". Leadership may put you in a class by yourself, but remember, says the Torah, you must not feel that you are above the folk. You cannot bask in warmth while you are oblivious to those who suffer in the cold. Your head can not be "lifted" from among the children of Israel.
©2000 Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky In the city of Lodz, the large industrial city in Poland, Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim zs"l would routinely be honored with the third "aliyah." The judges, elders of the community and town dignitaries would generally receive the sixth aliyah to the Torah. The "maftir" aliyah was reserved for hatanim and those who were observing the anniversary of the passing of a relarelative. The rest of the aliyot were, of course, distributed among the other worshippers. Needless to say, this system fell far from avoiding all strife and tension. On one week two people would be observing days of memorial, on another Shabbat the community would be celebrating both a wedding and a bar-missvah, etc. Unquestionably, the lives of the "gabbaim" in the large Bet Kenesset of Lodz were not easy.Once, however, there occurred an incident which was, by any standard, exaggerated.A certain ignorant, ill-mannered man gradually worked his way up the economic ladder and eventually became among the wealthier members of the community. He was proud of his fortune and proceeded to flaunt his wealth. He affixed a gold "atarah" to his tallit, he purchased a respectable seat by the eastern wall of the Bet Kenesset for a huge sum of money, and, one day, he turned to the gabbai and said, "This Shabbat I am celebrating a birthday.""May you live a long, happy and healthy life," answered the gabbai innocently."Thank you. I want to receive an aliyah," continued the wealthy man."It would be an honor," responded the gabbai, "but just know that someone is commemorating the memorial day for his relative, so he will receive 'maftir.'""No problem," assured the arrogant aristocrat. "The sixth aliyah is good enough for me.""But this Shabbat is the turn of the old judge," noted the gabbai. "I will call you for the fifth aliyah, like I always have.""Don't you dare!" warned the wealthy man sternly, his furious eyes flashing like lightening. "You better not insult me this way. You will give me the sixth aliyah, and no other aliyah!"Threats could never frighten the old gabbai. And so, when the fifth aliyah came around, he called the name of the wealthy man. The latter stood up from his seat by the eastern wall and approached the bimah. Only instead of stopping by the Torah to recite the berachot, he continued to the gabbai and forcefully punched him across the face. One can only imagine the turmoil which ensued in the Bet Kenesset - shouts, insults, name-calling and fiery spirits.Needless to say, such an incident can in no way be ignored. After Shabbat, the infuriated gabbaim went to the rabbi's home to decide upon a proper response. One thing was absolutely clear: things cannot continue in this way."Of course," agreed the rabbi. "So what do you suggest?"The gabbai which was hit stood up and raised an amazing proposal: to do away with all "kibbudim," to eliminate the procedure of honoring people with the various aliyot and other parts of the service, thus removing the root of all the ill-will and strife. The gabbai was well-stocked with dozens of examples where someone was insulted, another was hurt, how one individual needed to be asked forgiveness, the other needed to be appeased somehow - the standard headaches suffered by gabbaim throughout the years, in every community. What would be simpler than simply deciding to eliminate this entire system and decide once and for all that all aliyot are to be considered of equal stature? The distribution would be conducted randomly, and peace will finally be restored to the communities heretofore stricken by strife and dissent.The idea sounded great. Everybody focused their attention on the rabbi sitting at the head of the table, waiting for him to give his stamp of approval to the proposal at hand.The rabbi finally spoke up. "It certainly sounds like a good idea. No, a terrific idea. Yet, I cannot accept it."They didn't understand.The rabbi explained, "As you of course realize, it is a tragedy when people come to the Bet Kenesset looking just for honor. But it would be even worse if people would stop looking for honor in the Bet Kenesset."Indeed, for good reason Rabbi Eliyahu Hayim Maizel was called "Hakima D'Yehudai," the wisest among the Jews. Certainly, the seeking of honor - not to mention the pursuit of honor - is a trait to be discouraged. But, what can we do? Everyone (except us, of course) are stricken by this negative characteristic, to one extent or another. Perhaps they won't always call it honor. Maybe they'll refer to it as recognition, dignity, a show of appreciation, what have you. If this drive is not channeled in the direction of the Bet Kenesset, people will seek and find honor in all other walks of life. They will find it in large measure in all types of groups and other organizations. It is therefore preferable that the groups and organizations in which they look for honor are part of the system of the Bet Kenesset, that in this structure people satisfy their need for recognition and distinction. To the contrary, by seeking honor specifically in the context of the Bet Kenesset, an individual makes the strong statement that therein he finds his social circle, that particularly in the religious service he looks for appreciation. This will give him impetus to contribute from his time, energies, talents and money to the sacred institution of the Bet Kenesset.
http://216.239.53.100/custom?q=cache:HvTlFULcZRkJ:www.shemayisrael.co.il/parsha/aram/archives/vayesh59.htm++rabbi+maizel&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 .
- Monday, June 09, 2003 at 20:02:30 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am pasting here a draft of The Story of Arie Szewach of Krasne. I will post the full story in Krasne stories as soon as it is edited. I will like to thank Arie who is the first of the natives of Krasne to find the site and to show such great care for the memorial of his native town.
The Story of Arie Szewach of Krasne
I, Arie (Leibke) Szewach, was born in Krasne in 11-22-1925 to Miryam (Mriyasha) nee Sklut and Binyamin (Nyomzik) Szewach
My mother; Miryam was born in 1895 to Shimon and Reyze Rachel Sklut. The Sklut family had many relatives in Volozhin and Vishnevo. My grandparents; Shimon and Reyze Rachel lived in Krasne. Shimon was a blacksmith who had a great talent for making gadgets and I as all his grandchildren enjoyed the great toys he made for us. Other then my mother Miryam they had;
1. A son; Yakov Sklut who was born in 1900. Yakov was a blacksmith like his father. His wife was Sarah- Rivka. They had three children; Chaika was born in Krasne in 1924, Asher in 1925 and Motl in 1927. The family perished in Krasne
2. A son Moshe Itza. He had seven children. He died in his sleep at a young age and six months later his wife passed away. At that point of time there were no organized institutions to take care of Jewish orphans. To be an orphan most time was a “verdict” of desuetude. My grandfather; Shimon told his children who lived in Krasne to divide the seven children amongst the three of them and raise them as their own.Hirshel and Asher were raised at the Szewach home.
3. A daughter; Sarah who married Baruch Kaganovitz from Krasne they had a son; Motl who was born c 1930 and a daughter who was much younger. The family perished in Krasne. 4. Two daughters who came to the U.S many years before; Esther (Cohen) and Gite (see note) *
My mother; Miryam first married Shmuel Kelman. When my mother was still pregnant with her first child during the arduous days of World War I, rubbers came to the house at late night hour and murdered Shmuel Kelman and robbed the home. Shortly after my mother had her daughter , Dvora born in 1915. My father, Binyamin Szewach, was born in Pieski in 1900. His parents were Arie Leib and Alte. Later the family moved to Vilna.
Arie Leib and Alte Szewach had five children. Other than my father; Binyamin they had… Hanach (Chanoch) Szewach; he was in the business of selling alcohol, which at that time was something Jews were not allowed to do. When the authorities found out about his business and were about to arrest him, he was able to escape and immigrate to South Africa. His wife Chana Gitel with the three daughters and the son joined him in South Africa shortly after.
.Yosef Szewach lived in Vilna and was married before 1939. (he perished in Vilna with his wife)
Shalom Szewach lived in Vilna and was a pharmacist and owned with partner a large pharmaceutical enterprise in Vilna. He was single. He perished in Vilna with his mother.
Sarah nee Szewach Las was married and lived with her family in the town of Shtzotzin . She had a son; Arie Leib. They all perished in Shtzotzin. My grandfather; Arie Leib died c 1920 and my grandmother Elte lived in Vilna with her son, Shalom. My father Binyamin was taken to serve in the army. After a year of service his brother Chanoch who was very clever, helped him get out of the service claiming he was too young. Sometime later he was married to my mother and moved to her hometown of Krasne. I was born in 1925 and in 1930 my brother Mordechai was born.
My sister Dvora was a devout Zionist. She was a member of “HaChalutz” in Krasne and in the 1930s went to “HaChshara” Preparation for becoming a Chalutz (pioneer) in Eretz Israel.
Young Jewish men and women would live together in communities in Eastern Europe and earn money by doing difficult manual labor in preparation for doing agricultural work in a Kibbutz in Israel. Dvora spent about eighteen months in the Hachshara and when she ended her training she went back to Krasne to await her certificate from the British to be able to immigrate to Israel, that was at the time under their control. The British gave very limited amounts of certificates, and after a long wait in which she did not receive a certificate, Dvora plotted a different course of action. A young Jewish man who was born in Petach Tikva arrived in Poland with the soccer team of Maccabe. He was a citizen of Palestine (Eretz Israel). Immediately there was a wedding so he could take her as his wife back home. But when the British consul in Warsaw received the application he said to the man, “You were born in Palestine. You arrived here a week ago and in such a short time you passed to the other side of Poland, fell in love and married. Now you return to me, but I cannot believe this story.” So the consul continued, saying, “Young man, go to Palestine, and from there use the usual procedures to bring your wife to you if she is really your wife.” And that was it. The young man went back with the sterlings that he was paid already before coming to Poland and forgot all about the deal with Dvora. Years later, when Dvora arrived in Eretz Israel, she had to argue with him to annul the marriage.
So Dvora waited for another chance, and she then joined “Bitar”. “Bitar” was the most popular Zionist movement in Krasne in the 1930s. Unlike HaChalutz and Hashomer Hatzair, which had a Socialist Zionist core, Bitar had no Socialist ideology and had a more “militaristic” dogma.
A revisionist businessman by the name of Stavasky succeeded in organizing illegal immigration into Eretz Israel, and Dvora took such a ship in 1937. Near the shore of Greece, the ship was sunk, but she was able to get on another ship and after many weeks of travel she arrived in Eretz Israel as an illegal immigrant.
My cousin, Motl Sklut son of Moshe Itza., returned to the town as a certified teacher who had gotten his papers from the teachers’ seminary in Vilna. Motl was unemployed, so I, as well as the children of Abba Kaplan, Dvora and Shlomo, who were all still very young at that point, not yet school aged, became his students. Our fathers made an agreement with him to pay. The result was that the all of us (three children) skipped two grades when the appropriate time came for us to enter the Tarbut school
In the Tarbut school in Krasne all the subjects were taught purely in Hebrew except for the Polish language classes which were a compulsory subject, though even that was taught at a high level. When Abba Kaplan was no longer able to afford lessons for his children at the Tarbut school, they were sent to the Polish public school where their education was free. For me, skipping two years created many social problems since I was two years younger than all my friends, but the reward came when the war started and I was already two years ahead of my peers. That affected my advancement later on. My cousin Hirshl, son of Moshe Itza,. who lived with us went to study in the prestigious yeshiva in Volozhin. However, when he came of age, he was called to the local headquarters of the Polish army to be drafted. Since he wanted to avoid the draft he used a well-known scheme: he hardly ate and barely survived on tea for a month and would take very long walks all the way to Molodetszno, so when he came on the appointed day of the draft, he was found unfit for service. Because the Polish authorities were familiar with such tricks, they didn’t give him a permanent waiver, so he had to go through the routine twice until he finally received his discharge.


I spent my childhood years in the Krasne “Tarbut” School. Most of the Tarbut schools flourished in shtetls in the Vileyka area in the late 1920 as Zionism and the Zionist Youth movements spread their roots. They replaced the old fashion Cheders that in their core were religious studies.
Every vacation I would visit my family in Vilna. I would go there accompanied by a family member about three times a year.
To go from Krasne to Vilna in the 1930s you would take a train. There was a train station in Krasne that was about 150 kilometers from Vilna. The trip took six hours. When I was about eleven years old my parents let me take the trip all by myself. When I arrived in the train station in Vilna I hired a horse and carriage to take me to my grandmother’s house.
When I graduated from the Tarbut School the family decided to send me to a Gimnasia in Vilna. In order to attend the Gimnasia I needed to attend seven school grades. Since the Tarbut school only contained six grades the only choice in Krasne was the Polish public school which I attended for one year.
I attended the Gimnasia in Vilna only for a short time, in September of 1939 the Second World War started.

The “Liberation” by the Soviets. According to the Ribbentrop-Molotov Agreement of September 1939, Poland was divided between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. Krasne was a distance of 16 km from the old Soviet-Polish border, so it took only a few minutes and all the Polish cavalry that was sent to fight the Soviet tanks was destroyed. Much of the local population, including the Jews, was not happy to be “liberated” as the Bolsheviks had described in their accounts of the conquest of Belarus. Immediately as the Soviets arrived they started deporting people. At first they sent away the Communist party officers who were active underground for the communist party during the Polish times. Together with them they sent the Polish settlers with all the politicians and the Polish municipal authorities that they could find. The Polish settlers, or as they were known in the area, Osdoniki (Asdoniks), consisted of veterans who served in the army of Pilsudski and others, and were later brought by the Polish government so that they could populate the area with Polish people after it was conquered in the year 1921 by Poland. The prior population didn’t consist of any Polish people, only Belarussians. Now almost everyone was classified as a non-trustworthy element. It seemed that at any minute, someone could classify you as an enemy of the people and someone who could not be trusted, and anyone who was a political activist, and it didn’t matter what it was he did or really believed in, had the potential to be deported. First and foremost were all the Zionist activists. Pressured by the US, England, and France, the Soviets retreated from the area of Lithuania for a short time and an independent rule was established there for a short time.. But this lasted a short time and the whole area became part of the Soviet Empire.
. From Krasne, there were a few Jewish families that had been deported, among them the family of Avraham Flachtman. During the first World War, Avraham served in the Polish Army and received the highest decoration for bravery. Another family was the family of Nachum the Butcher. They were an older couple that had only one son, who was the head of Beitar in Krasne. At the time when the two families left, it seemed to us like a horrible tragedy, but all of them survived and later returned.
Despite the fact that the area was supposedly liberated from the Polish, the liberators kept the old borders between Belarus and the old Soviet Union. None of the recently liberated were able to go into the Soviet Union. This situation continued until the surprise attack by Germany on June 22, 1941 The Nazis were quickly in the outskirts of Minsk, and we fled, but the NKVD prevented us from escaping from the Nazis into the depths of the Soviet Union..
A family that succeeded crossing the border was Noach Broadner’s family. On the first days of the war despite the fact of the closing of the border, they found a way to cross it and the entire family survived.
My family tried for three days, like other families, to cross the border. We attempted to board the train to escape the approaching Nazis, but until the moment that the Germans arrived, there were instructions from Moscow to disallow any attempt to cross the border. The family tried to cross at another area, but there we also found the NKVD. we were ordered to return, so in great despair we returned to our home.
The Ghetto As soon as the Germans arrived, they announced the new rules with regards to the Jews. They established a local police force that used all the collaborators and immediately started robbing, confiscating property, and killing. The Jews were forced into all kinds of labor, and were treated with extreme cruelty. It seemed that the Nazis wanted to show to the local population that the blood of the Jews was worthless, and that the more you tortured a Jew, the more you would be appreciated by the Nazis. During one night, the Nazi soldiers broke down the doors to our house, as they did with all the other Jewish homes in town, and began beating everyone. They took us out of our beds, and made us run in the streets until we arrived in the place designated as the ghetto. The former homes of the Jews and all their belongings now were officially open for looting by the local population.
Living conditions in the ghetto were very difficult. A very small amount of food was given to the Jews and communication with non-Jews was disallowed. Soon they started bringing Jews from neighboring towns into the ghetto. They came from towns that were already annihilated. Every time before they annihilated a community, they chose a few Jews who could be useful and transferred them to Krasne. The place was chosen as a supply base for the Germans, where materiel was relayed to and from the front, including a large amount of weapons captured from the Soviets. Thousands of Jews worked in construction, in loading and unloading goods, and in other logistical support positions. Since the ghetto could not contain thousands of workers, the Germans established a labor camp, and they continuously brought Jews from neighboring towns after each action. As in other ghettoes and camps, there was a Jewish committee or Judenrat. At the head of the Krasne Judenrat was Shabtai Orlyuk. During the First World War he had been a POW in Germany for a few years and learned to speak German fluently. He knew of their way of life and their habits, or at least he thought he did. There were more than a few members of the Judenrat, and amongst them were some who were pure and decent, and others who were power- and money-hungry. Shabtai Orlyuk and the brothers of the Kaplan house, Yitzhak and Moshe, should be in my opinion classified as pure and decent, but others were not so. But still, amongst the others there were other levels of evilness and corruption. However, in general they seemed eager to fulfill the instructions of the Nazis with dedication, exactness and competence in the true spirit of the Nazi philosophy. At the end of the year 1941, a group of 30 Jewish youths was sent to cut firewood in the forest. I was sent Amongst those. We found flyers with a speech by Molotov that called on people to stand up with their weapons and to fight the Nazi evil. The forest was filled with such pamphlets, including a speech by Stalin. We did not lose our sense of humor. We started laughing, thinking that the pilot threw his entire cargo in a forest when it was probably intended for a town, and later told the Soviets that he had carried out his mission. Still, what was written there greatly affected us. When we returned to the ghetto we immediately started collecting weapons and organizing the young people to go to the forest. During the month that wey worked in the forest, we realized that it was possible to survive there, far away from the control of the Nazis. Wey also found a great potential to acquire weapons from the huge warehouses in the base where we worked. The main problem we faced was how to transfer the weapons and hide them so we would not be caught by the Nazis.
We started organizing ourselves into a group that contained local people who were natives to Krasne, and others who came from annihilated towns. The others were mainly young people whose families had been killed, which made it much easier for them to uproot. There was no one who would prevent them from leaving, and their objective living conditions were much more horrible than the local people since they had nothing to barter with and they did not know the local gentile population.
The place that was found as the most easy target to get weapons from was the old factory that used to make dried apples, but at that point it became a workshop for fixing weapons. It was located in the town of Krasne, and outside of the army base. The specialists there were older German soldiers and the way they treated the Jews was generally more humane, particularly since it was winter and they also suffered greatly from the cold. Someone suggested that they should ask them to let the Jews collect some wood and transfer it by horse and sleigh to the ghetto. They agreed but they still supplied soldiers to watch the operation. In spite of the soldiers the operation was successful, and with the wood the Jews were able to transfer some weapons, particularly rifles. Mostly it was semi-automatic Russian weapons that held ten bullets. The Jewish girls in the group also were able to sometimes transfer guns. Amongst the best operators was Dvora Kaplan, who studied with me and her brother Shlomo. When the Judenrat found out about the weapons and the preparations for escape, they came to the parents of the youths who were involved and threatened them and started following the youths.
So one day I succeeded in transferring together with Yosef and Duba (brother and sister from Horodok) Rabinovitz, three rifles. The Judenrat, who secretly followed us, found the hiding place. They took the weapons and imprisoned the three of us. They started beating us up and threatened us as well as my parents. Many days later we found out that the Judenrat members gave our stolen weapons to their children and sent them to the forest to join the partisans. Since they were not informed about the difficulties they would encounter in the forest or how to communicate with the partisans and which areas were more dangerous, they went to a different area than the rest of the Jews that were preparing to escape, and they were robbed and killed. Once we had weapons, without which we knew we had no way of being accepted to the partisans, we started leaving the camp sporadically and trying to connect with the partisans. I left twice but returned. My parents and especially my father, were opposed to my plans to join the partisans. Friends that left with me and didn’t return joined different partisan units. There were some tragedies too; even among the Russian partisans there were some who hated the Jews.
The partisan brigade was established by Red Army soldiers who had succeeded in evading capture by the Germans. They had found jobs in the neighboring villages. Hundreds of thousands of Red Army soldiers fell as POWs and were put in camps where they were starved and many were murdered in a systematic something? By the Germans. At one point, the German army and the police started collecting all the soldiers who had escaped to the villages, but when the soldiers found out about it they ran deep into the forest. As the Red Army retreated, many units made sure to bury their weapons in the forest, and this was the seed for our weapons supply, since many of the soldiers in the villages were from units that had buried their weapons. At first they were very small units of armed men who basically used the weapons to physically support themselves and to rob the neighboring towns. As their numbers were enlarged they started a real army with discipline and rules. From that point, to go to the forest and have a chance to join the partisans meant that you must bring a weapon so you could join such a troop. Later on, from 1943, most of these troops were essentially a regular army. Among the young Jewish men and women who were prepared to escape from the ghetto was Itzhak Rogovin (Regev) who was originally from Horodok. He was amongst the very first of us who were able to escape and to be accepted into the partisans. Unlike others he did not forget us in the ghetto. He sent a farmer with two sleighs that arrived almost to the inside of the ghetto attempting to take out the entire group of young people ready to join the partisans. To my great sorrow, everyone started discussing what we should do and arguing and the parents didn’t agree that I should leave. They were worried that the Judenrat would take revenge on us, and they had other fears. So the messenger left and came again the next day in an attempt to persuade people to go. Once again there were many discussions but people delayed leaving. The third day he came and no one again wanted to join him, but I, alone, left with him. Although my father continued his opposition to the idea, I came to say goodbye but he still was very much against it. On the other hand, my mother helped me get out the weapons and maps that I had hidden and told me, “Go my son, maybe you at least will survive.” When I arrived in the forest and waited for Itzhak, he didn’t show up. I waited for three days and when he didn’t show up I decided to just go on my own. I entered a house in the village with my weapon, and I asked a farmer to harness the horse to the sleigh, and I traveled for many, many hours until in a morning hour I met with a partisan unit. To my great luck, the commander was a major who was a Jew originally from Minsk. He had been trained as a Red Army officer prior to the war. He welcomed me and I had no difficulty in getting used to being a partisan. After a few weeks I was appointed to a sabotage unit. Our unit contained six fighters, all Jews, and the job we received was to put explosives on the train tracks and blow up trains going in the direction of the front. During most of 1943 we had to acquire the raw materials and prepare the explosives. As the year 1943 came to an end we built in the forest a place for planes to land, and a twice a week a plane would arrive, filled with explosives, weapons, and commissars and NKVD people who came from the Soviet Union. I participated in a respectable number of successful demolition missions and also intelligence gathering operations where I was able to find contacts for purchasing first aid and medicine, as well as raw materials for explosives. As we searched for explosives we found an area in the forest surrounded Minsk in Belarus that contained huge amounts of weapons buried by the retreating Soviet Army. During our missions in the forests we would meet many Jews who had escaped from the ghetto in Minsk, but they didn’t have any weapons so we knew that we couldn’t take them to our area without weapons. But as soon as we found that area with the weapons, we started taking small groups of Jews there, and when they came to our camp with weapons, they were accepted into our group. But eventually the plot was discovered and I was imprisoned along with other members of our unit. We were convicted for betrayal and ill use of state property. They said that the weapons we found in the forest should have been brought to the camp immediately and not given to Jews that escaped from the ghetto. The man that we should give our thanks to for letting us survive and cancelling the whole trial was Shlomo Harhas, who arrived from the Ghetto in Mir. Shlomo Harhas was one of the organizers of the large breakout of Jews from the ghetto in Mir. He was aided in this escape by Oskar Ruffheisen, who later on became Brother Daniel. To save us, Shlomo, with the help of other friends, brought a large amount of alcohol and food to the camp, and there was a party that lasted for three days. Meanwhile we were released and all was forgotten. Nothing was written in our files about it.
My wounds and the discovery of penicillin Some months earlier, in May of 1943, we encountered a German blockade and during the battle that ensued, Baruch Milikovsky from Volozhin was killed, and I was wounded. We were at a distance of about more than three days’ walk from the nearest partisan base, and my friends needed to assist me to get there by walking through the night and even through the day sometimes, depending on the area. During that period I didn’t receive any medical aid. When I finally arrived to the first partisan camp, I received some aid from a major who was a doctor. His leg had been amputated and he was a POW at one point, and since he spoke German fluently he was able to get a job as an interpreter for the Germans in the town of Horodok. The partisans disliked him and they were able to capture him. Since he was earlier on trained by the Soviets for spy missions, he learned to speak German fluently. He was very clever and he succeeded in convincing the partisans’ headquarters that he was innocent and they forgave him, and he became the doctor for the brigade. So this so-called docttor, when I arrived at his place I was at a very ciritical situation. All he did was sew my wounds and leave me to die. My friends, who were sure that I was mortally wounded, put me again on a sleigh and took me to a distance of about 25 km to the camp where our brigade was located.
Amongst the people who escaped from Minsk and who our unit helped get weapons for acceptance into the partisans was the Taitz family. The head of the family was a orthopedic doctor, as was his wife. Dr. Taitz was once the assistant of the famous Professor Shapira. With them they also had their son who was 16 years old. Dr. Taitz started checking me and was shocked to see the poor care I had been given, so in a very primitive condition, with the little light provided by lutzunky (little pieces of wood?) he cleaned the infection and cut the wounds then sewed them. I was in a horrible condition. I had a very severe infection. Mrs. (also Dr.) Taitz was together with her son and she rode a horse to a camp that was about 80 km from there, where she thought she might be able to receive some mdeicine for the infection. She was able to receive medicine from a unit that had come from the Soviet Union. This unit contained mainly political people who would come to the forest by plane, so they had a large supply of medicine. So shortly after, I recovered and returned to take part in missions. As I later found out, the doctor who originally took care of me, the one without a leg, was executed during July of that year. The partisans found out that he was communicating with the Germans, and aided by his lover who he brought to the camp, and she was the relay between him and the Germans.
Despite my general recovery, my right shoulder continued to leak pus. All the attempts that were made to heal it did not work, and I lived with constantly changing wraps that I received from the local farmers which were made from the local cotton (?). At night we would take part in missions, but during the days we would always look for a hiding place, usually far away from main roads or villages. These were isolated places where we could safely retreat in case someone discovered us. One of the places we used to hide in was Blutkovishzina. As the name attests, it had something to do with marshes. At one time, when I asked a farm woman for some materials to cover my pus, she looked at my wound and the way I was taking care of it. She immediately announced to me that she knew how to take care of it, and how to do so fast. The woman who I have no doubt was illiterate, had a magical cure that I found out years later, after the war, was penicillin. The medicine that she used contained stale bread mixed with cobwebs. On top of that, clearly she put some holy water that the priests had blessed. It’s hard to believe, but it took less than a month and the wound completely cured.
When I returned to the camp, I showed Dr. Taitz my wound and told him what had happened. He said I was very lucky that I didn’t expose myself to a new, bigger infection. Sometime after the war, a doctor who invented a medicine based on these old folk remedies received a Nobel Prize in Medicine. Dr. Taitz did not forget me, and in spite of the fact that I returned to missions in a somewhat handicapped condition, he still made sure to include me, in June of 1944, in a mission to bring wounded people across the border and into the Soviet Union. We were taken in a Dakota plane. Those same planes would bring weapons to the area and return to the Soviet Union with the wounded.
“From what brigade did you come? What brigade did you belong to?”
I was taken to a hospital in the town of Nova Vilitza near the town of Gormel, which was completely destroyed at that point. I was sent for questions to the Belarussian Partisan headquarters. I was taken to an interview by a young officer whose job was, as was usual procedure in the Soviet Union, to write up a questionnaire for me that contained hundreds of questions. We encountered a problem right away, as I was asked to name the battalion from which I had arrived. When I announced that I had belonged to the Andreyev (Andreyevich?) Battalion, my interviewer, as well as others who stood nearby, looked as if they were in shock. I was sent, after a short time, to a place where I was supposed to spend the night, and asked to return the next day. When I arrived on the morning of the next day, I was immediately told by the officer that I must have been very gravely wounded and that I had some kind of mental shock, and that I was suffering from amnesia. But he made some inquiries and everything was ok. He found out that the battalion that I had served in was called For the Soviet Homeland. As a citizen of the Soviet Union, I understood that I must agree with all that was told to me and not to question anything. Later on I found out the whole issue in the Soviet Union, towns as well as enterprises and army units were usually named after Soviet heroes that rulers wanted to honor. Comrade Andreyev was elected for membership in the Politburo of the Communist Party, the prime office the ruling party, but this had been years before, and the head of the brigade, by the name of Sokholov, when he had decided to name the battalion, didn’t know that some years before, Comrade Stalin executed Comrade Andreyev as a traitor. During the war years they were disconnected, having no contact since the 22nd of June, 1941. Anyway, now I received papers that I served in this battalion whose existence I first heard of that day.
My cousin Motl Sklut, who had been my teacher when I was younger, also escaped the ghetto and joined the partisans, where I got back in touch with him. While guarding the camp on what turned out to be the last day of the war, the Germans attacked the camp and he was killed
Fifty years after the victory over Germany, when the Soviet Empire collapsed and turned into different republics, the Belarussian government decided to celebrate the occasion of the victory. Since Belarus was liberated in the year 1944, they decided in 1994 to make a huge celebration. Amongst all the people who were invited were all the heads of the partisans who had fought in the different fronts in Belarus. Amongst them I was invited, the partisan from ghetto Krasne along with a few other partisans of different nationalities. During this occasion, I met a few people, and one of them wanted to prove to me his position and his connections and he offered to show me my personal files from the Belarus partisans archives. To tell you the truth, this was as interesting to me at that point as the snow that fell in Siberia before the war, but to be polite I said fine. I was asked to write my address in Israel, which I did reluctantly. Many weeks passed and I received in the mail a print of my personal files, and from it I learned that when I first came to the battalion all my personal information was written down, amongst them my social class, meaning what was the job of both of my parents, and other similar information that for some reason seemed very important to them for our fight with the Nazis. But most surprising to me, was that the name of my battalion was clearly written as Andreyev. This, for some reason, was not changed or erased as the Soviets usually did with the encyclopedia, where they would cut a page and instead put a new page.



*The Sklut daughters that came to the States were Esther (Cohen) Esther had a daughter Ethel and they lived in Detroit. Esther's husband was blind and he went back to the East Coast, leaving them alone in Detroit , Michigan. My husband's family went to Europe in 1928 --found out about Esther and made arrangements for her to come with her daughter, Ethel, to Chicago where they would get her an apartment and a job. Before it could be accomplished, Esther had an appendix attack and died, so my in-laws took Ethel (then aged 13) to Chicago and raised her as one of the family. I always knew her as a sister to my husband. Ethel died a couple of years ago in California--but she has four children there and we are very close. Actually--her granddaughter is expecting a baby next month. We are waiting to hear. Ethel's daughter is ESTHER--perhaps if her granddaughter has a girl--it will be named after Ethel
I do have lots of information. Lots of it in folders in my file drawers at home. I am working on the Skluts, Kaplans, Fishkins and MY OWN families: Rosenthal, Horowits, Goldman and Schuchalter. I keep a big drawer for each family. I also have family in Hadera, Roichgman (my mothers’) and Lavi (my father’s). Jewel



click for a picture of the Szewach family
- Saturday, June 07, 2003 at 11:15:05 (PDT)
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The Story of Avraham Reckin of Haifa (from a phone conversation with Eilat Gordin Levitan from June 4, 2003) Avraham told me that his son, who is also a dentist like him, recorded nine videos with him about his life.
Avrohom-Aizik RECKIN (a dentist, like many members of his family)
Was born in 1924 in HORODOK
Mother; Feyga-Sora nee GELPERYN RECKIN (pronounced RETZKIN) died in 1929 in HORODOK Feyga Sarah nee Galperin had many brothers and cousins who settled in Maine, and hardly any of the Galperin family remained in the area. She died when Avraham was five. The father never remarried.
? Father: Efroyim RECKIN born in 1879 in Sosenka. His father was the rabbi of Sosenka and later the rabbi of Vileyka. The original last name of the family was MOHOLIVER and they were brothers of the well known Shmuel MOHOLIVER who was born in Globoki in 1804, the son of Yehuda Leib. was such a talented boy that by the age of 12 he was already studying at the Volozhin Yeshiva. He was a rabbi in Globoki, Shaki, Radam, and Bialystock. He established the first committee of Hovovei Zion (the Lovers of Zion) in Warsaw, and influenced many of the most famous rabbis to buy land in Israel. He even influenced Baron Edmond Rothschild to buy land in Israel. There was a place established in Israel by the name of Gan Shmuel in his honor. He was a rabbi in Bialystock where he died in 1898.
The three original brothers Moholiver changed their last name to RECKIN to avoid army service. He had brothers in the town of Gormel, which in the 1920s was part of the Soviet Union, and Efroyim would send them packages of food since the situation was so grave in the Soviet Union at that time. Since it was politically dangerous for the receivers to be connected with Poland (in 1921 Horodok became part of Poland, and the border between Poland and the Soviet Union was about 1 km from Rakov, which was on the way to Minsk), Avarham’s father was told to not send packages anymore and all relations with the family were lost. Efroyim RECKIN studied in the Volozhin yeshiva during the time of Biyalik. In Horodok he was the head of the Jewish bank and he also had permission to run a liquor distribution business.
? was Rosh HaKahall [leader of Jewish community] in HORODOK)
Other children of Feyga-Sora nee GELPERYN and Efroyim RECKIN
Yaakov was born in 1908 died. age 14 in HORODOK from typhus
TWIN of Yaakov (Chava?) died very young)
Esther (d. in Holocaust in KRASNE w. family) Esther Bloch, who was born in 1912, had four children. In August of 1942 the Germans surrounded the ghetto and the children that they found were thrown in a well and killed in a most horrific way. Amongst them were Esther’s twin daughters, and another daughter and a son. She and her husband also perished, but one of her husband’s brothers survived the war and his family settled in Israel
Rachel (perished in Holocaust in KRASNE) Rachel was born in 1914. She was in the Hachshara, which was a preparation for an agricultural life for members of the Ha’Chalutz who would get ready to immigrate to Eretz Israel.
Devorah OKUN (b. 1915; d. 3/86 in ISRAEL) Devorah was born in 1915 in Horodok. She was the only sister of Avraham that survived the war. She was very attractive and Menachem Begin, who would visit the area of Horodok in the 1930s, usually stayed at their house and was very charmed by her.
Then there was Rivka, who was born in 1916. She was married to Elisha Kopelovich from Radishkovich
Chayim (perished. in Holocaust in KRASNE with son) Chaim was born in 1918. He was married to Bela Litzki (?) from Horodok
TWIN of Chayim || (d. very young)
Leah (perished. in Holocaust w. family) Leah was married in Molodetszno to Moshe.
In September of 1939, after the partition of Poland, when the area was annexed by the Soviet Union, the family worried about being classified in the wrong class so they moved to Molodetszno, where Devorah received a good position in the bank there. She was then able to bring the whole family to Molodetszno except for Rachel and the father, who stayed in Horodok Some of the leaders of Bitar were deported to Siberia. Amongst them was David Flechtman (Shazar ) who was later the head of Solel Bone in Tel Aviv. Before the arrival of the Soviets Avraham was in a course to become a leader of Etzel (Begin’s organization. A non-socialist Zionist organization). he studied also to become a dental technician.
In June of 1941 As soon as they heard of the German invasion, the family took their horse and buggy and went to Horodok to collect their father and sister en route to Rakov, where they would try to cross into the Soviet Union. But they were not allowed to go, and at the same time, Avraham and his friend took their bicycles and also tried to cross at a few places, but they did not succeed either.
They returned to their homes and soon after the Germans entered the area and implemented rules that restricted the Jews in every aspect of their life (curfews during night hours. No travels out of town, no communication with non Jews, no gatherings of more then three Jews at the time, no Jew could walk on the side walk, yellow tags and hard labor were must for survival. )
The wealthiest Jewish people of the community of Horodok were immediately killed, amongst them; Meisel, Zukerman and Palik. The wife of the feldsher (medic) of Horodok blamed the Jews for the deportation of her son during the Soviet times and now she gave the Nazis names of local Jews to be killed.
Efroyim Reckin was forced to be part of the Judenrat that became the go between committee of Jews that implemented the orders and wishes of the German rulers and their local collaborators. Believing that if they will serve the Germans and make the community useful to the invaders the Germans will keep them alive.a ghetto was established.
In the summer of 1942 Fruma Lifshitz was in the Horodok ghetto … “The bitter end of the Horodok ghetto arrived at the Shabbat that Yakov spent with us, on July 11th 1942.
The Jews of Horodok and the vicinity did not sense the oncoming danger. Their last sleep had been a sleep of the just. Tha next morning at an early day break hour the Gestapo and its local assistants intruded the Ghetto to take out the Jews. five persons lodged at our home (The Reckin home).
There were three hiding places. The hideout in which I concealed myself with my little girls was discovered by the local police after the action had already passed.
Mr. Reckin, who was an elderly man, could not sustain the strangling atmosphere in the small hidding place. We assumed that the action had already passed and he was obliged to go outside. His going out had provoked our hiding disclosure. They shot at Yakov and killed him on the spot. Afterward the murderers gathered all the Jews they found into the square to be selected. Those they found able to work were transferred to the Krasne camp. The old ones, invalids and children were sent to death. Among the sentenced to die was also Fruma, Tsivya Tsart's mother. She had been beat bestially, until she was covered with blood. The Germans enclosed all of them inside a barn, shot them and burned it.
[ In this barn, 900 Horodok Jews found their tragic fate, along with Fruma Lifshits's mother and her five
gradchildren, among them Shoshanele and Hayele Lifshits. Yakov had been shot by one of their Horodok gentile neighbors. Fruma witnessed her husband's death and had seen the bestial murderers throw away his body.]I was expelled to Krasne. Heyne my older sister was enclosed in the Krasne Concentration camp, and my younger sister was placed with me in the Krasne Ghetto. There I met people from Volozhin, among them Yosef Tabakhovitsh and his wife Elke nee Shaker. Tsviya Tsart dwelled beside me and my sister on the same planks. It was impossible to safeguard any hygienic conditions, and a typhus epidemic broke out….”
Most of the adults of the Reckin family were also transferred to Krasne. Avraham was in the camp in Molodeczno building a radio station for the German army. His father was able to arrange with the Germen Gvint kommisar to transfer by trucks Avraham and other young Jews from Molodeczno shortly before the community was annihilated.
Two days after Avraham arrived to Krasne he was able to escape to the forests and join the Russian partisans.
After some time with theSoviet partisans he received permission to bring his family to the forest. When the farmer he sent arrived in Krasne the entire family exept for his sister Dvora was sick with typhus. The farmer only took Dvora to the forest. Two days after Dvora arrived she became sick with typhus and some of the partisans wanted to kill Dvora fearing that the typhus will spread. Avraham pointed to the leader how unjust it would be that Dvora who received permission to escape a death sentence by the nazis should be now killed by her “Russian saviors”. Dvora was let go and Yakov Sigalzik and others helped her. Dvora recovered and eventually married Yechiel Ukun from Sventzian. About fifty natives of Horodok survived the holocaust. Amongst them; Avraham Kagnovitz, Yitzhak Lavit, Yakov Eidelman, Shepsel Shpringer, Moshe Baran with his brother and sister, Eizik Noll, Bronia nee Kur, her husband Rabinovitz and her sister Leyka, Shaposhnik Eliyahu who was able to join his brother; Zemach in Israel (his brother Feibe perished)
Yafa Sheine Litzki (sister of Raphael and Shaul)
When the war ended Avraham married Sima LASKOW (LASKOV) from Smorgon a relative of Rav Aluf Chaim LASKOW.they had two sons;
Efrayim
Binyamin Other relatives from Jason Alpert tree;
Efroyim (b. 1945; l. SVENCIAN,BYELORUSSIA)
Sonya RUDERMAN (l. ISRAEL)
Rita PILDZHIN (l. ISRAEL)
Rivka (Mrs Elyosha) KOPILEWICZ (d. in Holocaust w. children)
------------------------- (husband Elyosha died in Russian army near KONIGSBERG [KALININGRAD]) --
Yitzchok GELPERYN (l. HORODOK; d. in Holocaust in KRASNE)

Tziporah HORVITZ (b. 1915; l. KIBBUTZ MESILOT,ISRAEL)
Peninah || (d. in Holocaust in KRASNE)
Devorah || (d. in Holocaust in KRASNE) . There was also Tzipora Galperin, who was a member of Hashomer Ha’Zair, and in 1930 was able to immigrate to Israel, where she lives still (now aged 98) at Kibbutz Mesilot. One of her sons was killed during the Yom Kippur war, and a second son died shortly after from leukemia. There is a daughter who lives near her and some grandchildren.








.
- Friday, June 06, 2003 at 19:13:17 (PDT)
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I am researching my mothers mothers family, Scolnik from Lewiston.
I had heard that Dave Fessler has a Scolnik Email group on list-serve.
I found your kuritnets page in a google (gilgul?) search and I saw the
names Scolnik and the story about being originally Alperovitch.
My mother: Eileen (Reifler) Isseroff
Her Mom: Mary (Miriam) (Scolnik) Reifler
Her father: Izzy Scolnik (Isidore? Yisrael?) married to Ana Agronowitz
Anna died and Izzy remarried to Richeler or Richelson from Lewiston.
Izzy used to travel up Lewiston a lot.
My mother remembers a sister or an aunt "Haschke" (I saw a Ashke on your
page).
I wrote to Dave Fessler, but he changed emails a few times and is hard to
get hold of, even with what is probably his most current email.
Does any of this sound familiar?
Raanan Isseroff
Brooklyn, USA

My grandfather Zalman (Sam) Scolnik and his brother Jassel(?) emigrated from Kurenets to Lewiston, Maine in 1908 to join another brother Yudel (Julius) who was already there. Another brother Kalman came to the U.S. about 1890 and was married to a Mary Gurewitz.
Dave Fessler Since Howard Jordan and Lou Scolnik were Lewiston men — they had played together in high school in bands led by Lloyd Rafnell and Lou Paul, with Dick Poulin’s Varsiteers — we were able to recruit some townies. (The Bobcats, which emerged as a band as early as 1930, certainly had roots in Lewiston. Richard Tuttle ’35 remembers band leader Gil Clapperton ’32 augmenting the band with Lewiston musicians.)
Nina Scolnik
Pianist Nina Scolnik has concertized in the United States and abroad as a soloist, chamber musician and accompanist. She collaborates regularly with cellist Nathaniel Rosen, Tchaikovsky Gold Medalist, and has also performed with distinguished German cellist Gerhard Mantel. She has been guest soloist with the American, Angeles, and Lydian String Quartets, and has appeared in numerous festivals such as Aspen, New York, Amherst, and the International Kodaly Festival in Kecksimet, Hungary. Widely recognized for her masterclasses, lectures, and work with injured pianists, Ms. Scolnik is a leading exponent of the work of
Dorothy Taubman. She serves on the piano faculties of the University of California, Irvine and the Taubman Institute of Piano at Williams College, Massachusetts, positions she has held since 1979.
Born in Lewiston, Maine, Ms. Scolnik is a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory and the Juilliard School of Music. She has studied with Dorothy Taubman and with Edna Golandsky who has mentored her for over two decades.
In August, Ms. Scolnik will give masterclasses and lectures on the
Taubman Approach at Piano Fest Austria in Bad Aussee.
Dated: June 15, 1983


______________________________________
Louis Scolnik
Justice, Superior Court MSEA v. City of Lewiston, No. 83-14, rev'd sub nom. Council 74, AFSCME v. MLRB, MSEA, City of Lewiston, and Lewiston School D..

Louis Scolnik, Auburn SEPT 7, 1983 Ret. JUL 31, 1988 Maine Supreme Judicial Court Justices, Chronological List
Scolnik, J., .
- Tuesday, June 03, 2003 at 02:09:06 (PDT)
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Blessed be the people who did it!The Almighty will pay you & we the descendants will continue to bless all of you.
arie shevach <ashevac@netvision.net.il>
Omer, israel - Monday, June 02, 2003 at 08:33:06 (PDT)
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The Sklut daughters (of Shimon) that came to the States were Esther (Cohen) and Gite l (??) Esther had a daughter Ethel and they lived in Detroit. Esther's husband was blind and he went back to the East Coast and they were left alone in Detroit , Michigan. My husband's family went to Europe in 1928 --found out about Esther and made arrangements for her to come with her daughter, Ethel to Chicago where they would get her an apartment and a job. Before it coudl be accomplished--Esther had an appendix attack and died--My in-laws took Ethel (age 13) to Chicago and raised her as one of the family . I always know her as a sister to my husband. Ethel died a couple of years ago in California--but she has four children there and we are very close. Actually--her grandaughter is expecting a baby next month. We are waiting to hear. Ethel's daughter is ESTHER--perhaps if her grandaughter has a girl--it will be after Ethel
I do have lots of inoformation. Lots of it in folders in my file drawers at home.. I am working on the Skluts--Kaplans--Fishkins and MY OWN families--Rosenthal-Horowits-Goldman and Schuchalter. A big drawer for each family.
I also have family in Hadera--Roichgman-- my Gmothers and Lavi my Fathers. Jewel
.
- Saturday, May 24, 2003 at 14:33:46 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------ Hello,
Just wanted to thank you guys for getting such an informative site. Excelent
graphic photoshop designed and easy to navigate.
Your site is indeed a wonderful and i bookmarked it. I have found some of
the information here helpful. I have closed more time explained around me with
the contents of your home page from each other now. Unfortunately, there are
little good sites. Your site is very good. Thank you for the opportunity to sign your guest book.
I will recommend and come back. I found it very interesting to read other peoples
comments about your site. Sandra
- Friday, May 23, 2003 at 08:44:33 (PDT)
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Thank You!!!! That is the right family. I have connected current Sklut families from Maine to California--Toronto to South Africa and ALL have come from Volosyn and are connected. Mostly to Shimon Sklut. My late Mother in law was a niece to Shimon and her father Leib C(K)aplan married two Sklut sisters . Many of the families are now in Hadera in Israel and I met Dvora Einhaber several times whiie visiting in Hadera.
Where did YOU get the information? It is so exciting to know all that history and now to be able to perhaps add MORE people who are directly related.
THANK YOU AGAIN and keep on. Jewel Rosenthal Fishkin Glenview, Illinois
.
- Thursday, May 22, 2003 at 15:58:47 (PDT)
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My cousin Danny Koor has been in contact with you, and has sent me all the details he has received from you so far.


We share the same grandfather Shlomo Chayim, or Solomon Koor as he was known in England. My late mother Marie, and Danny's late father Henry were brother and sister, together with 2 surviving sisters Hannah and Lily.


The family lived initially in the East End of London, moving to Notting Hill in the 1920's, where my grandfather eventually became minister of Notting Hill Synagogue until he died in May 1946.


There is so much more to tell, but I am particularly interested in photo 4. Do you know who the 3 men are, because the one in the middle looks very much like me when I was younger?


Are there any members of the Kur family, who settled elsewhere, other than Israel?


I look forward to hearing from you


Regards


Stephen


click for pictures of the Koor family
- Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 20:09:59 (PDT)
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My cousin Danny Koor has been in contact with you, and has sent me all the details he has received from you so far.
We share the same grandfather Shlomo Chayim, or Solomon Koor as he was known in England. My late mother Marie, and Danny's late father Henry were brother and sister, together with 2 surviving sisters Hannah and Lily.


The family lived initially in the East End of London, moving to Notting Hill in the 1920's, where my grandfather eventually became minister of Notting Hill Synagogue until he died in May 1946.


There is so much more to tell, but I am particularly interested in photo 4. Do you know who the 3 men are, because the one in the middle looks very much like me when I was younger?
Are there any members of the Kur family, who settled elsewhere, other than Israel?


I look forward to hearing from you


Regards


Stephen



click for pictures of the kur family
- Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 20:06:03 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
My cousin Danny Koor has been in contact with you, and has sent me all the details he has received from you so far.
We share the same grandfather Shlomo Chayim, or Solomon Koor as he was known in England. My late mother Marie, and Danny's late father Henry were brother and sister, together with 2 surviving sisters Hannah and Lily.
The family lived initially in the East End of London, moving to Notting Hill in the 1920's, where my grandfather eventually became minister of Notting Hill Synagogue until he died in May 1946.
There is so much more to tell, but I am particularly interested in photo 4. Do you know who the 3 men are, because the one in the middle looks very much like me when I was younger? Are there any members of the Kur family, who settled elsewhere, other than Israel?
I look forward to hearing from you Regards
Stephen Dear Stephen and Danny, Breine nee Kur Rabinovitz (first cousin of your grandfather) as her one sister who survived the holocaust, settled in Israel. However 3 of the children of Breine live in the U. S (Los Angeles area) and one in Israel. The children of her sister are in Canada. Breine is visiting her children and grandchildren in Los Angeles presently.
she is 87 years old and amazing woman!!!!
She is an actress and a singer (Yiddish) and she entertains in Jewish centers.
She also writes poetry. I recorded her on Video last week. She is in picture #3 in "Kur." I told her about Danny and she ask me before I had a chance to tell her where he lives if he lives in Jerusalem. Are there other relatives in Jerusalem? She said to me before that her father had a brother Pinia who lived in Vileyka and his son is Nechemia Kur in picture 1. She received my email address from his daughter in Israel. In picture #4 I only know that Breine's brother (Eliezer Kur) is on the left.
Could you scan pictures of your family for the site?
Yehoshua of Vileyka had at list 3 sons;
1. Moshe the father of your grandfather (did he have brothers)?
2. Pinia, the father of Nechamia (I will ask Breine for more information on the family)
3. Mordechai kur, father of Breine, Avraham, Leika, Eliezer and Dishka.
I know that article by Rabbi Yakov Landau is difficult to edit. I avoided translating it hoping that a religious person would do the job-but no such person volunteered (I have asked Chabad Rabbis to do it ).
so I, a third generation "atheist socialist of Israeli style," had to do it!
I believe that it is better to do a poor job then nothing. I could always correct it at a later date.
Hope to hear from you soon, Eilat .
.
- Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at 09:25:26 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------ In a message dated 5/18/03 1:27:43 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ashevac@netvision.net.il writes: please can you advice my how can i add my memories and my story of what happend in krasne during the shoa i am one the several who succseded to went trough. Dear Arie and others in Israel;
I would very much like to add your story. could I have you phone number?(Email it to eilatgordn@aol.com) I could call you and you could tell me your story then I will write the story in English and put it on the site. I speak Hebrew. You could also send me your written story (in Hebrew or English)Eilat Levitan 3895 Eureka Drive, Studio City, Ca 91604 U.S.A
Hope to hear from you soon Eilat
.
- Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 17:45:37 (PDT)
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I am from krasne iam a surviver of the shoa i want to add some of what i was trough and our shtetl. How can i do it?is it possible to write in hebrew?
arie shevach <ashevac@netvision.net.il>
Omer, israel - Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 13:16:36 (PDT)
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I am from krasne iam a surviver of the shoa i want to add some of what i was trough and our shtetl. How can i do it?
arie shevach <ashevac@netvision.net.il>
Omer, israel - Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 13:12:37 (PDT)
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What a well done website!
Mort
- Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 09:15:55 (PDT)
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Wonderful site! Really great!
Kazu
- Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 06:59:01 (PDT)
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What a well done website!
Britany
- Sunday, May 18, 2003 at 03:43:21 (PDT)
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My name is Avraham Yeshaiah (nee Arnold Sheldon) Greenhaus.
I was born in Brooklyn NY in November 1935. My grandfather was Jeschaia (later Samuel) Grinhaus (spelling uncertain).
My grandmother was Hanna Reichel (later Anna Rachel)Grinhaus (nee Zimmerman).At what point the name was given its partially Americanized spelling is uncertain. They came to the US in 1891(?), from Rozhnevitz(?), Radoschkovitz(?). Anyone having any information please contact me.
Avraham Yeshaiah Greenhaus <avgree@yahoo.com>
- Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 14:09:55 (PDT)
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Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp March 01, 1904 0026. Meisel, Israel M 34y M Russia, Hebrew Horodok
going to brother ; Leib Meisel 4575 Eastford? Street,
025.Schulmann, Meische M 32y Married Russia, Hebrew painter Horodok going to brother in law; Leib Meisel 4575 Eastford? Street, Brooklyn
Meisel, Sore Leie F 17y S dress maker Russia, Hebrew Krasne going to uncle Epstein in New York
Waganschmi..., Izik M 30y M Russia, Hebrew Riken
0028. Fischbein, Heiser Leib M 31y M Russia, Hebrew carpenter Rikew
0029. Woloszynski, Moische M 26y S Russia, Hebrew Oschmerna tailor
November 29, 1905
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam
Meisel, Dobe F 50 yr W Russia, Hebrew Haradok
With daughter in law; Meisel, Sossie F 20 yr Married Russia, Hebrew Haradok
0018. Meisel, Ytrek M 9 yr S Russia, Hebrew Haradok
0019. Meisel, Grisne F 11 mo S Russia, Hebrew Haradok
going to Dobe's son ; Yisrael Meiselis erased and another ? Meisel is there on 406 Leonard Street in Brooklyn
going to Sosie husband; Yisrael Meisel in 201 Siegel? Street Brooklyn, New York. with the two children.
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp May 24, 1904
Meiser, Fsser M 43 Years old Married Russia, Hebrew from Goradak
carpenter going to son; H. Meisel 4861 Leonard Street Brooklyn
Sagalowitz, Fzak M 32 Y M Russia, Hebrew Gorodok going to brother in New York
0017. Ladowsky, Rivke F 36 Y M Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0018. Ladowsky, Feige F 11 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0019. Ladowsky, Fukem M 9 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0020. Ladowsky, Chana F 7 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0021. Ladowsky, Leizer M 5 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0022. Ladowsky, Feutel F 3 Y S Russia, Hebrew
0023. Ladowsky, Faukel F 6 M S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0024. Ladowsky, Perl F 29 Y M Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0025. Ladowsky, Schinuel M 9 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0026. Ladowsky, Morische M 7 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok
0027. Ladowsky, Lore F 4 Y S Russia, Hebrew Gorodok going to husband and father Ladowsky on Chanal Street in New York


.
USA - Wednesday, May 14, 2003 at 23:21:56 (PDT)
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Today I called Moshe Baran.
Moshe was born in 1919 in Horodok to Ester nee Weisbord from Volozhin (born in 1902 and Yosef Baran who was so born in Horodok 1890 (His grandfather; Avraham Pinchas was born in Oshmina grandmother; Riva Risha). Moshe's parents met when his father attended the Volozhin Yeshiva and he had a "Keset" (room and board) at the house of of the Weisbord family in Volozhin.
Ester nee Weisbord had four sisters;
1. ? Married a Persky in Volozhin and had two daughters; Gitel born c 1912 and Zila born c 1916. Gitel was married before the war. The family perished in Volozhin.
2. Shoshke married Yisrael Mayzel and lived in Horodok. At one point they immigrated to the U. S and some of their children were born there. The family returned to Horodok were the mother died. some of their children went to Cuba and in 1950 went to Luisiana.the rest of the family perished in Horodok.
3. Bela, a twin sister to Ester went to Louisiana (Shreveport) she had a family there.
4. Chana married a lampart and perished in Volozhin.
Moshes' father; Yosef Baran had a brother; Hirshel Leib Baran who moved to Kurenets after his wife died. one of his sons also moved to Kurenets. Hirshel perished in Kurenets. His son escaped to the forest and was later killed. Moshe had twin sisters; Mina and Musha, they were born in 1928 his brother Yehoshua was born in 1922.
In 1928 the family moved to Rakov. The father had a leather factory there. Yakov Lifshitz was Moshes' teacher in Rakov. Pruma nee Shulman lifshitz (Yakov's wife) was his teacher in Horodok.
The family lived in Rakov until 1932 and then returned to Horodok.
Moshes' father and one of his sisters perished in the holocaust. Moshe, his mother, his brother Yehoshua and the other sister were sent to the work camp in Krasne.
One time when Moshe was working on the rail road for the Germans two Jews from Warsaw were working near by. They were ordred to put away some Russian weapon that the Germans found.Moshe and the guys were able to hide some of it and take it to the Ghetto. in January of 1943 a Jewish woman asked Moshe to help her to escape with her two children (7 and 9) she told him that she knew of a forest were other Jews from the area were hiding and she would take him there if he would help them.
Moshe took his weapon and escaped with the woman and her children. They arrived in the area of Kramnitz near Ilja and found the Jews. Since Moshe had weapon he became a member of the partisan unit Hanokem (Masitel) the leader was Lunin and the Komisar was Patashkevitz.
Moshe was able to help his mother, sister and brother escape from the Krasne camp on March 17,1943 two days before the camp was annihilated. Moshe served with the partisans until 1944. in the spring of 1944 when the Germans knew that they had lost the war in the East (Of Europe) they started a huge blockade against the partisans. Moshe and his unit were hiding in the marshes for many days.
Moshes' Mother; Ester was the only Jewish mother in Horodok who survived the Holocaust. after the war ended the family was on the way to Israel when the family of Ester's sisters in Shreveport, Louisiana found out that they survived. They pleaded with them to join them in the U. S. They were well of and helped them to settle in America.
Today Moshe lives in Pittsburgh next to his sister. Yehoshua lives in Los Angeles.
Moshe told me that some years ago he visited Yisrael Garber the son of the Shochet of Hordok who now lives in New York. Yisrael had a movie that was made in Horodok in 1933 by Dov Shapira who was born in Horodok.
Dov left Horodok when he was 13. He did well in America and in 1933 he and his wife came for a visit and Gave large sums of money to the Rabbi of Horodok for the community. They also gave five dollars to each person even to the little children. They also made a film of their visit. Moshe knew that the film must be for more then a personal use. He transferred it to a video and send copies to Horodok people in Israel and also gave copies to Jewish organizations. the video Horodok could be ordered for $30 at;
http://www.brandeis.edu/jewishfilm/titlepricestart.html
"Image Before My Eyes," is the name of a 90-minute film about Jewish life in the Pale of Settlement between the two World Wars. The video includes some, but not all, of the footage from the Horodok silent video, as well as some different footage of what was obviously the same visit. This excerpt also includes interviews, segments on other locations and on other topics, including the wooden synagogues, of which so very few remain. The modern parts are in color, and the entire 90-minutes is also available through The National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis.
http://www.brandeis.edu/jewishfilm/titlepricestart.html
Moshe told me that there are other videos of
Resistance and Stories of Jewish Partisans that he (and some other partisans from the area of Horodok and other areas ) detail their battle first for survival and then for revenge in the towns and forests of Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus between 1941 and 1945.


.
- Wednesday, May 14, 2003 at 21:25:25 (PDT)
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I heard from Leah Nakhshon-Shiff that the Radoshkovitsh, Krasne, Rakov, Horodok meeting on May 4 was successful.
I could not come; my sister was landing at the airport, coming from Paris during the conference time.

Regards,
Moshe Porat .
- Wednesday, May 14, 2003 at 10:52:23 (PDT)
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Thursday, 24th April 2003
Dear Mr. or Ms. Salinger:
Thanks to Eilat Levitan I get your address.
She compiled a phantastic collection of the data of my ancestors Klaczko and Ryndziun an she mentioned also your name in this context.
Let me therefore present myself herewith, but based on the remarks of
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/klaczko.html
Klaczko Family I am Salomon Klaczko-Ryndziun,
a son of Shaie (Yeshayahu) Klaczko (born 1908) and Nakhame Ryndziun (born 1901), both from Vilna.
My father was a son of Shloime (Salomon) Klaczko (born 1874 in Vilna), himself a son of Shaie Klaczko.
I inherited therefore the name of my grandfather. But he - on his side - inherited it also from his grandfather, Reb Shleimele (Salomon) Klaczko.
My grandfather Shloime Klaczko was born in the same year as another child named also Salomon Klaczko, suggesting that short before 1874 their common grandfather, Rabbi Shloime (Reb Shleimele) Klaczko from Vilna died. This other Salomon Klaczko, also born 1874, was the son of the Head Rabbi of Vilna, Shepsel Klaczko, then also a Jewish member of the City Council of Vilna. Please notice that about 1870 Vilna owned around 150 Synagoges and Jewish Kloises (small pray houses) and that Shepsel Klaczko was therefore the head of a large Jewish community of some ten thousand of people. 1812 Samuel Klaczki (written in Polish notation) was the head of the Kahal (Jewish Community, having autonomous penal and tax levy rights among the Jews). As Napoleon occupied Vilna in June-July 1812 with his Grand Armee, a Jewish member of the French secret service of Fouchet approached on 8th November Samuel Klaczko and two other Kahal members - Seelman (certainly Zalmen) Urias and Gershon Jochel - requesting from them to form a secret cell of cooperation with the French occupation against the Tzarist government. This Jewish agent, a sefardic Belgian citizen Alexander Facgu(nde)z De Belem, was assigned to the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Paris. This agent left Vilna on 9th December 1812, one month after its initial meeting with Klaczki, Urias and Jochel. Apparently the three Kahal members did not cooperate with the French occupation as expected. (Source: S. Posener, "L'Univers Israélite", Paris, August 1934, reporting about a document he found at the "Archives Nationales de France" in Paris; quoted by Israel Cohen: "Vilna", The Jewish Publication Society of America, Philadelphia 1992. REMARK: Wether Israel Cohen nor S. Posener were acquinted with the reach history of the Portuguiese Jewish Community in the Netherlands, nor do they correctly read the hand-written mansucripts of De Belem; in particular they do not understand that Portugese immigrant Jews in Amsterdam and Hamburg spoke Hebrew and Arameic as well as did it Ashkenasi Jews in Vilna, and they do not recognize Facgundez de Belem as a typical Jewish family name in these communities of former portuguese annussim which escaped catholic inquisition).
The documents collected by Eilat Gordon mention that Tsvi Hirsch Klaczko were later on the leader of the Kahal, where Samuel Klaczko was a member some decades before. They were certainly relatives.
Regarding Julian Klaczko, the son of Tswi Hirsh Klaczko and Taybe Klaczko (NOT "Toybe"!), his Jewish first name was Iehuda. He used the Christian Version Julian for non-Jewish purposes, just like I use Shloime in Yiddish and Salomon for non-Jewish purposes.
It is reported that Rabbi Mordkhe (Mordekhai) Klaczko Meltzer (Meltzer = malt beer brewer in German, born 1797, died 1883) became the head of the Yeshivah in the Clois (NOT "Kolyoz"), i.e. in the Pray House of the chimney sweepers in Vilna at the Straszun Street until 1844. In this Yeshiva my grandfather Salomon Klaczko became the Shamesh about 1920, until he died 2 years later. My grandfather had an accident about 1918 and became handicapped, leaving therefore the company he owned and retreating to the clois activity (Clois, from German "Klause" = Closed Room, for Instance "Bier Klause", and this from Latin). This Chemney Sweepers Yeshiva became a center of revolutionary activities about 1887. My grandfather lost his parents (his father Shaie and his mother) as a little child and was adopted by somebody else, as did the 12 other children of these parents. As a child he was sent to learn chemney sweeper and he joined naturally the correspondent clois and its yeshiva. Chimey sweepers were in some sense owners of certain privileges, as their activity was protected by a state monopoly concession, in order to ensure their security function to prevent city conflagration. The concessions were held by Jewish entrepreneurs and the chimney sweepers had to work for them 12 hours a day. However, they felt strong enough to bargain for a reduction of the working time from presently 12 down to 10 hours daily, except Shabbes, the Holy Day. The Jewish concession owners rejected this request and denounced to the Tzarist police that the Clois was becomming a subversive center. Hence some of the older chimney sweepers were arrested by the police. The younger ones - among them my grandfather Shloime Klaczko - and Mende Perkin (who became years later his father in law) prepared a strike, founding in their clois the oldest Jewish trade union known until now. Such a trade union was considered an illegal criminal association according to the then prevailing Tzarist law. Due to a retaliation action of the chimney sweepers against a concessionary - Joshke Khvalies - who had aroused the prison of the older leaders, both, Mende Perkin and Shloime Klaczko were arrested together with some other chimney sweepers and condemned in a Tzarist court trial. After 2 years prison on the Lukishky jailhouse in Vilna the Tzarist criminal court decreted their extradiction to Yakutsk in Eastern Siberia, months away from Vilna. My grandfather was released from Yakutsk about 1905 and he founded a small company working for the Tzarist army. During this time he donated a lot of money for the Chimeny Sweepers Clois and Yeshiva, where he himself were a leading board member. Hence, the tradition of the Chemney Sweepers Yeshiva was associated with the name Klaczko at least twice during one century. There was another Rabbi Mordkhe Klaczko in Vilna, who died about 1839. He was a grandson of Issakhar Ber Klatzki, the brother of Reb Elie ben Shloime-Zalman, more known as the Vilna Gaon. This coincidence suggests that both Rabbies Mordkhe Klaczko had a common ancestor called Mordkhe. Rabbi Mordkhe Klaczko Meltzer was a rabbi also in Calvaria, from 1852 until his death 1883. Calvaria was merged as a part of Vilna, after having been in the 19th century just a border town of. There is therefore no real difference between both destinations.
I would truly appreciate your comments to the above remarks.
Sincerely yours Dr. Salomon Klaczko, Managing Partner
LOPOS Technologies GmbH
Ness 1, D-20457 Hamburg, Germany
Tel.: +49 40 375 172 02; Fax: +49 40 375 172 06
Email: klaczko@lopos.com; Web: www.lopos.com


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- Wednesday, May 14, 2003 at 10:48:51 (PDT)
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Isaac SHOR
Death: 1804 in of Emden and Vilna son;
Ezekiel halevi LANDAU Birth: 1779 was Av Beit Din in Vilna Death: 1870 Spouse Unknown Children;
Elke LANDAU Death: 1829 Marriage 1 David EPSTEIN Children
Isaac EPSTEIN daughter; YOLLES married Zechariah Isaiah hakohen YOLLES b: in of Lvov
daughter LANDAU Marriage Haim KLATZKO Children;Beila KLATZKO Spouse: Meshullam Zalman Finkelstein Simeon ben Asher GUNZBERG Birth: in of Vilna Spouse; Sarah Mirke EISENSTADT Children
Benjamin Wolf KLATZKO b: 1788 Vilna Death: 1877
----------------------------------- Harry KLATZKO Marriage 1 Rose SHLEFSTEIN Children;
Irma KLATZKO b: 15 JUN 1907 Death: 15 DEC 1997 Mt. Lebanon Cemetery
Marriage 1 Philip BEISPIEL b: 20 MAR 1900 Children
Living BEISPIEL Marriage 1 Living LANDAU Children
Living LANDAU-BEISPIEL
Leon KLATZKO b: 21 DEC 1909 1 Estelle BARETZ b: 22 NOV 1919 Children
Living KLATZKO
Living KLATZKO

Louis KLATZKO
Death: 14 Feb 1995 in Johannesburg, South Africa
Marriage 1 Dora GRUZD b: Abt. 1907
Married: 1942 in Johannesburg, South Africa
Children
Living KLATZKO Marriage Living ATIE Children
Living ATIE
Living ATIE
Living ATIE
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- Friday, May 09, 2003 at 20:16:28 (PDT)
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Searching for the Kantorovich family from Slonim/Belarus and also for Keylman/Keilman family from Gorodki/Belarus.
One of my great-greatgrandfathers, the head of department of the railway compagnie ( St. Petersbourg to Warschau ) in Vilnius, Jakob David Kantorovich was born in Slonim ( b. ca. 1825/30, d. ca. 1903 in St. Petersbourg/Russia ). On 1860 in Riga/Latvia Jakob ben David Kantorovich was married with Henriette Wilhelmina Minne Mindel Isaakovna, nee Keilmann.
Both had three children: Sophie Jakobovna Kantorovich b. 1863 in Vilnius/Lithuania, Alexander Jakobov Kantorovich b. 1866 in Vilnius/Lithuania and my greatgrandma Eugenie Jakobovna Kantorovich b. 1868 in Vilnius/Lithuania.
I'm also searching for a great jewiosh family named Key(j/I)lman(n) from Gorodki. Some of them went to Ulla near Witebsk, other went to Lithuania, Courlande and Latvia.
I'm searching for all documents, photos of my jerwish ancestors from Slonim, Vilnius, Riga
rob.dup.@gmx.de
.
- Thursday, May 08, 2003 at 07:51:17 (PDT)
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.....Byelorussia's Jewish population numbered almost 1.1 million on the eve of the German invasion. In fact, many of Byelorussia's largest cities - Minsk, Vitebsk, Mogilev, Gomel, Bobruisk, Orsha - had Jewish majorities. The invading Germans began the murder of Byelorussian Jews soon after their arrival. Jews who were not killed during the initial operations were forced to move into ghettos. These ghettos were systematically liquidated from the fall of 1941 to the fall of 1943. German authorities a lso accused the Jews of being the driving force behind the Soviet partisan movement, whose members began to operate in growing numbers behind German lines in the spring of 1942. For example, Wilhelm Kube, the Commissar General for White Ruthenia, equated Jews with partisans in the same report in which he proudly told his superiors about the murder of 55,000 Byelorussian Jews during a ten-week period in the spring and summer of 1942. (3) Most Nazi crimes in Byelorussia, particularly the murder of Byelorussian Jewry, were committed by mobile forces. Units belonging to two of Heydrich's Einsatzgruppen - A and B - were operating in Byelorussia. They received assistance from regular German police battalions and Waffen-SS units. To be sure, some of the Einsatzgruppen headquarters became stationary at the end of 1941 for the purpose of establishing an SS/police structure in the occupied Soviet Union. Yet, the occupiers' killing opera tions never really lost their mobile character throughout the occupation owing to the expanse of the areas to which these forces were assigned. After the war, members of the Einsatzgruppen were the subjects of several trials, most notably that of Otto Oh lendorf and 20 other officers before a U.S. military tribunal from July 1947 to April 1948. (4) Beginning in 1950 West German courts also tried Einsatzgruppen men. (5) In addit ion to the courts, historians also began to investigate the Einsatzgruppen and publish their findings. (6) While the history of the Einsatzgruppen is by now well-documented, the same cannot be said for most of the indigenous units who assisted the Germans in the murder of Soviet Jews and gentiles. Some - like the Arjas Commando, the Kaminsky Brigade an d the SS unit "Druzhina" - have attained great notoriety. However, historians have paid little attention to the large numbers of lesser-known indigenous "security" forces without which the Germans would have encountered greater difficulty in liquidating entire ghettos and staging massive murder and pillage operations disguised as anti-partisan actions. The Germans established two types of local units: the Schutzmannschaft and the Ordnungsdienst. The forme r generally operated in areas under civilian administration and fell within the SS/police command structure; the latter was established in army and army group rear areas and placed under the authority of local and district military commanders. Historians have only recently begun to study the Schutzmannschaften and the Ordnungsdienst. (7) .....
From;
Investigating Nazi Crimes in Byelorussia:
Challenges and Lessons by
Frank Buscher
http://muweb.millersville.edu/~holo-con/buscher.html
click fto read the entire article
- Monday, May 05, 2003 at 22:59:34 (PDT)
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n response to a question that was posed on this web site, my Father, Boris Green (Greniman), is indeed still alive and well at age ninety years of age.
I would like to add that recently he was interviewed on Yiddish radio regarding his war experiences and this can be heard at the following address: http://203.15.102.140/news/languageGroup/lgCurDisp.php3?vlang=Yiddish#57928
Jack Green
jack_green@optusnet.com.au
Melbourne, VIC Australia
click here <jack_green@optusnet.com.au>
- Sunday, May 04, 2003 at 23:59:53 (PDT)
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Central events of Holocaust Remembrance Day
Monday, April 28
20:00 - Official opening ceremony, Warsaw Ghetto Square, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem 20:00 - Lighting of torches and memorial ceremony, Massua amphitheater, Kibbutz Tel Yitzhak Tuesday, April 29 10:00 - Siren 10:02 - Wreath-laying ceremony, Warsaw Ghetto Square, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem
10:30-12:30 - "Unto Every Person There is a Name" - recitation of names of Holocaust victims at Yad Vashem and at the Knesset; another ceremony of name recitation will begin at 9 A.M. and continue until nightfall at Beit Wohlin, Givatayim 13:00 - Main memorial ceremony, Hall of Remembrance, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem
19:30 - Closing ceremony, amphitheater of the Ghetto Fighters' House, Kibbutz Lochamei Hagetaot.

Mourners march at Auschwitz, mark ghetto uprising
By Reuters OSWIECIM, Poland - High school students joined Holocaust survivors from around the world in Poland on Tuesday to mourn Jews killed at the Auschwitz death camp and mark the Warsaw Ghetto uprising against Nazi rule 60 years ago.
President Moshe Katsav and his Polish counterpart, Aleksander Kwasniewski, led 3,000 people in the "March of the Living" through Auschwitz's gate, bearing the infamous German inscription "Arbeit Macht Frei" (Work Makes You Free), to the nearby twin camp at Birkenau.
"With the sun, birds singing and blue sky you can't really imagine that these heinous crimes happened here," said Avishai Nalka, 16, a high school student from Ashdod. "I only saw this place in black-and-white history films, now I see it in color."
More than a million people, mostly Jews, died in the gas chambers or from disease and starvation at Auschwitz, the German name for Oswiecim, during World War Two. Six million Jews were killed in the Nazi Holocaust. Poland's pre-war Jewish community of 3.5 million was reduced to 300,000.
Organizers of the march, which was part of Holocaust Remembrance Day, said there were fewer marchers than in recent years due to security concerns over the recent war in Iraq. The event also marked the 60th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, which has become a symbol of Jewish resistance against rule by Nazi Germany.
On April 19, 1943, Jewish fighters launched a desperate last stand against German occupying forces to resist looming deportations to death camps. They held off the Nazis for several weeks with homemade explosives.
Also marching was Norman Frejman, 72, who as a child survived the Warsaw Ghetto, deportation to the Majdanek death camp and slave labor in Germany.
"God wanted me to survive: All my family perished either in the Warsaw Ghetto or in the camps. I am getting old, so I had to come here to see it once again. This is hallowed ground, because the ashes of Jews are scattered here," he said. "I also wanted to attend the 60th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. This is very near to me," said Frejman, who left for the United States after the war and lives in Florida.
Holocaust Remembrance Day is marked on a different day each year because it is linked to the 27th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan, when the uprising began. In Israel, sirens brought the country to a standstill for a two-minute silence and flags were at half-mast for the memorial.
"
- Tuesday, April 29, 2003 at 08:50:12 (PDT)
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http://www.thejewishexchange.com/images/holidays/yomhashoah/sixmillion.html?source=tea Jewish Exchange Holocaust Presentation
(IsraelNN.com) The Jewish Exchange offers Internet viewers a Holocaust Day presentation, a time for reflection
click here for the Holocaust Presentation
- Tuesday, April 29, 2003 at 08:00:15 (PDT)
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Thanks a lot and keep working hard!
Palèka Smuka Erotièna Stran
Palèek Smuk
- Tuesday, April 29, 2003 at 03:44:54 (PDT)
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Krasne was part of Poland between 1921 and 1939;
Poland emerged as a bourgeois republic under the influence of the great revolutionary movement which swept the whole of Eastern and Central Europe in the years 1917-19. Although the reborn state did not solve the basic economic and social questions, its legislation granted equal rights to all citizens irrespective of nationality and religious convictions. This was guaranteed by its constitution adopted by the Sejm in March 1921 . Thus were abolished the legal norms inherited from the partitioning powers, which gave different legal status to various groups of society. However some questions as laid down in the constitution lent themselves to various interpretations. In 1931 the Sejm passed a law which abrogated expressis verbis all regulations which were discriminatory on grounds of religion, nationality and race. In this respect independent Poland fulfilled the people's hopes. The matter was different in the field of economic relations. In the inter-war period Poland found herself in an extremely difficult situation. Leaving aside the fluctuations of economic development experienced by all capitalist countries (a particularly deep drop in production, employment and incomes was noted in the first half of the 1930's), the average increase in the number of places of work was far behind the population growth. Overpopulation of the countryside became more acute, which in turn brought about the shrinking of the internal market and the resultant impoverishment of petty tradesmen and craftsmen. Unemployment in towns took on catastrophic dimensions. In these circumstances, especially in the 1930's, the pauperization of those strata which earned their living from small shops increased. Economists spoke of the overcrowding of trade and crafts. According to the 1931 census of the nearly 32 million Polish citizens, 10 per cent (or some three million) were Jews. Of this figure 42 per cent worked in industry, mining and crafts and 36 per cent in trade and kindred branches. Other occupations played a lesser role in the Jews, occupational structure. In some branches of the economy Jews constituted a majority. This concerned above all the retail trade where 71 per cent of all tradesmen were Jewish. In the clothing and leather industry this percentage was almost 50. Typical Jewish occupations were tailoring and shoemaking. However in the conditions of massive unemployment, in spite of the over abundance of certain specialties in crafts, they had no chance of finding employment. At the same time there was a growth in the number of merchants and craftsmen of other nationalities. In the countryside, the expanding cooperative movement became a serious rival to the private merchants. It would be wrong to assume that the concentration of Jews in certain branches of the economy and their pauperization were the result of a deliberate policy on the part of the state. It is true that the administration was unfavorably disposed towards employing other than Polish nationals in state enterprises, especially those of military importance (for example railways and armaments factories) and therefore removed Jews from these establishments. However, the direct reason for anti-Jewish discrimination has to be sought in the past, in the relations which had been formed in the period of the partitions. The overcoming of the traditional occupational and social structure of the Jewish community could be accomplished only by the acceleration of the economic development of the country as a whole and also by the creation of conditions favoring the acquiring of new trades which had not been popular among the Jewish community. This problem was also perceived by some Jewish organizations which undertook actions aimed at training young people in various specialties. This was done most often by the Zionist organizations which in connection with their Palestinian plans attempted to prepare groups of settlers having definite trades. However the scope of this action was very modest indeed since it depended on winning financial means as well as those willing to go to Palestine. Similar undertakings could not be carried out on a mass scale without appropriate assistance from the state in a situation where the government found it difficult to acquire sufficient financial resources for the most urgent needs. What is more, even if money had been available, the specialists trained in this way would not have been able to find employment anyway.
The same objective reasons made it impossible to overcome the concentration of Jewish laborers in small enterprises and workshops, while it should be borne in mind that over 70 per cent of the Jewish urban proletariat were employed in such small establishments.
This adverse situation was also affected by some traditional customs and religion. Since Jews observed Sabbath, it was difficult to employ in one enterprise both Jewish and Christian workers without disorganizing the rhythm of production. Even Jewish entrepreneurs unwillingly employed a Jewish labor force. Of course not all of them were Orthodox Jews and not all of them refused to work on Saturdays. However those who wanted to work on Saturdays were treated with suspicion by their employers who feared lest they belonged to a socialist or communist organization and one day might organize the factory work force in struggle for their interests. In smaller establishments, in which the owner himself took part in both the production process and management, work on Saturdays was suspended. The Jewish question in inter-war Poland was above all a social problem. Without solving the problems which were common to all working people, there was no chance of changing the lot of the Polish Jews. And the capitalist system provided no prospect of a radical overcoming of backwardness and increasing the number of jobs, despite efforts on the part of the state undertaken in particular in the second half of the 1930's.
Thus emigration continued. There are no exhaustive data on this subject. However, it is known that between 1927 and 1938 nearly 200,000 Polish Jews left Poland, of which number 74,000 went to Palestine, 34,000 to Argentina and 28,000 to the United States. The largest waves of emigration were recorded in the 1920's. Following the great slump, after 1929, those countries which up till then accepted immigrants, introduced new, ever more severe restrictions on immigration. This concerned, among other countries, the United States. For this reason in the 1930's overseas emigration limited in scope while the number of those going to Palestine increased. According to the most reliable calculations, between 1919 and 1942 almost 140,000 Polish Jews went to Palestine, that is, some 42 per cent of the total number of immigrants accepted by that country; the largest intensification of Palestine-bound emigration took place in the years 1933-36 when the number of emigrants amounted to 75,000.
In the difficult economic situation and the changes in legal and political status of Jews after Poland had regained her independence, various programs of activity were formed. The traditional program of the Agudat Israel, which boiled down to the observance of religious prescriptions, loyalty towards the state and the expectation of the Kingdom of God, could not suffice. Although the position of this party among the petite bourgeoisie was maintained by the authority of the zaddikim (a particularly important role in the leadership of the Agudat Israel was played by the famous zaddik of Gora Kalwaria who was however criticized by many), its attempts at consolidating a specific kind of ideological ghetto (the isolation of the Jews from the goyim) resulted in a gradual decrease of its influence. Step by step the party moved towards the acceptance of the prospect of building a Jewish state in Palestine.
On the other hand, the influence of the workers' parties continued to be strong. The most important role was still played by the Bund, some concepts of which were close to those of the radical left wing, though its members represented a whole variety of views. The Bund differed from the program put forward by the communists in that it demanded cultural and national autonomy for national minorities, especially for the Jews, and perceived the necessity of organizing the whole of the Jewish proletariat in one, separate national party. Many Bund leaders saw the need for dictatorship by the proletariat (the Bund program adopted in 1930 mentioned the possibility of such dictatorship). The party was decidedly opposed to the conservatives and discarded religion. It accused the Agudat Israel of defending the interests of the propertied classes to the detriment of the needs of the masses. The most outstanding leaders of the Bund were Victor Alter (1890-1941), Henryk Erlich (1882- 1941) and Samuel Zygelbojm (1895-1943).
The Bund, like the illegal Communist Party of Poland to which many Jews also belonged and the Polish Socialist Party, saw the only chance of solving the Jewish question in Poland in building a socialist society without man's exploitation by man. It sought its allies among workers of all nationalities living in Poland. It opposed all concepts of emigration since it perceived the impracticability of the idea of organizing emigration of a several million strong nation. The socialist leaders considered the Palestinian campaign to be an element weakening the forces of the proletariat fighting for a change in social relations and as a solution which at best could constitute a chance for only few.
A radical social program was also voiced by the left wing of the Po'alei Zion which saw prospects for the Jews in a socialist revolution and in introducing cultural and national autonomy. For the future, it accepted the idea of building a socialist Jewish state in Palestine and therefore it supported the Palestinian campaigns. Its leading members were Antoni Budhsbaum, Szachna Sagan and Jozef Witkin-Zerubavel (1876-1912). A much smaller following was enjoyed by the right wing of the Po'alei Zion which concentrated above all on Palestinian works, that is all activity aimed at forming. a future Jewish state, including education of qualified farmers, workers and soldiers.
All the workers, organizations, irrespective of the differences that separated them, cooperated in many important issues. They undertook a common struggle against campaigns organized by the right wing of the National Democratic Party. In Warsaw they even formed an underground organization the task of which was to put up armed resistance to the nationalist militants. Both Jews and Poles connected with the workers, movement took part in its work. http://members.core.com/~mikerose/history2.htm Click for the rest
- Sunday, April 27, 2003 at 15:41:52 (PDT)
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he Story of Leah Dudman-Bar and Chana Podversky from a conversation with Leah Dudman
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_pages/vstories_leah.html

At first I was sent by the Judenrat to work in the army camp near Bogdonova. I worked there baking bread for the Germans and from there I was transferred to the army camp in Podberze. Together with me all the time there was another Vishnevan girl by the name of Chana Podversky, the daughter of Itza-Lebl Podversky. The usual procedure was that every Sunday we would go home and the German commandant treated us almost like a father. He had six daughters and he always emphasized that fact and loved to converse with us. Most of the times when we would go home he would drive us in his car so he could take some food supplies for my family. At more than one occasion he entered our home and saw with his own eyes the suffering of my parents. With tears in their eyes they begged him to save me and my sister Raisel. He promised he would do whatever he could. On that awful Sunday he also took us as usual to our house and as we neared the gate of the ghetto, we saw thousands of Christians gathering around one of the homes. We also saw a dark haze and smoke reaching up to the skies, and there were screams. At first we thought it was some Christian person who had died, and my friend and I whispered to each other, "They deserve it" or something like this. But when we came closer to the ghetto gate, a Christian woman stopped the car and screamed as loud as she could, "In the name of God, get out of here. In town they are slaughtering everyone." The commandant and the soldier said to us, "Immediately get out of the car and run to your work place. We will go inside the gate and see what is happening there." When they returned they told us that when they arrived there the SS people who were surrounding the town forced them to take part in the annihilation and the killing of all the Jews of the town. And that was not all; they ordered them to bring us there, and if they didn’t the commandant would be punished. The soldier who was with him the entire day witnessing the torture told us what he saw with tears in his eyes. From all the awful sights he saw he now was vomiting and had diarrhea the entire day. The commandant immediately told us he would not give us up no matter what. He suggested that for this night we sleep there but early in the morning we must run to one of the Christians that we knew and he would keep in touch with us. We did as he told us and we reached the Christian man and hid in his house for a few days but when things became more dangerous since the SS troops looked for us everywhere including where we worked, and in the sheds, and in the place we were hiding. It was a miracle they didn’t find us. So he transferred us to a Polish woman’s house where we hid for 6 weeks. At the end the Christian man made a communication between us and the Jews from Kerve who would go to work in Bogdonova. Since now the Jews of Vishnevo were annihilated and a few others went to the forest. So now they were replaced in Bogdonova

click for her story
- Saturday, April 26, 2003 at 23:43:12 (PDT)
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Amazing website!
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Hi,
Whilst reading through my LitvakSIG digest today your
surname suddenly popped out. An ancestor of mine - Sora Rajkhzeligman m. Geives
Ruvin Levitan in Vandziogala, Lithuania on 03 Feb
1894. Geives had a younger brother - Eliash Levitan
who was married to Zlate Grinblat. Eliash and Zlate
and their family lived eventually in New York. I'm
trying to trace any descendants of Sora and Geives.
On a hunch I looked up in EIDB and found a Sarah
Levitan that might be "my" Sora, but I couldnt find
her descendants - son-in-law Abraham Edelman. I don
know her daughter's name, or if she had a son/s who
went to USA. Does any of this strick a bell? Would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel =====
Searching:
REICHZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sasy, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds
.
- Saturday, April 26, 2003 at 09:44:45 (PDT)
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I called Bushke nee Katzovitz Bloom(in Israel), the granddaughter of Feiga nee Deutch and Shlomo/Shloime Gitlitz of Dolhinov.
She told me that Feiga and Shlomo Gitlitz children were;
1. Shimon Gitlitz who perished in Dolhinov and has one son; Yechezkel, in Israel. 2. Abba Gitlitz who perished in Dolhinov with his wife and three sons.
3. Yosef Gitlitz and family perished in another town
4. Batia nee Gitlitz Lipkin? came to Israel before the war and has family in Israel 5. Chana nee Gitlitz Katzovitz had two daughters; Bushke Bloom and Chaia Barzam with her first husband and one daughter; Sara nee Forman with the second husband; Yaakov Forman son of Leibe, Chana and the daughters survived the war and the daughters with their families live in Israel.
6. Chaia Sora nee Eidelman was a teacher and also the head of a school. They did not live in Dolhinov. Her husband was from another place (maybe Volozhin) He was also a teacher and they lived in other places until the war. They came to be with her mother in Dolhinov and perished with their son Gdalyau and Feiga nee Deutch in Dolhinov
7. Ytzhak Gitlitz was in Israel. died in an accident. He had a family in Israel. Feiga nee Deutch and Shlomo Gitlitz were well to do family in Dolhinov.
For some years they owned two homes in the best location in Dolhinov.
Shlomo was a Blacksmith and in the big yard of his home farmers from the entire area come to fix their tools. He had some special machines for sharpening the tools. Since Bushke and Chaia lost their father at a very young age they lived with their mother Chana at their grandparents home.
At age 13 Bushke was sent to a high school in Vilna. Very few families from the area were able to sent their kids to Vilna since it was so expensive. From that time on Bushke would only return to Dolhinov on vacations. as you know she later went to a college in Grodno.
Bushke told me that after they escaped to the forest in early 1942 and the winter was so cold she went to kurenetz were the Jews were not put in a ghetto. She was able to walk around since she had light hair and did not look Jewish. in the forest near Kurenets she ran in to my grandfather's first cousin; Nachum Alperovitz (who looked Jewish) She asked him to help her and he took her to his parents home. (If you were caught helping Jews who escaped from other places the Germans would kill you)she lived there for a while and later moved with Bluma who was a tailor and moved to Kurenets from Dolhinov. In Kurenets Bushke met with some youth who joined the partisans (amongst them she remembered my mothers' first cousin; Zalman Uri Gurevitz who would also visit Dolhinov during vacations to be with his relatives there and Yosef Norman from Vileyka and also Rivka nee Alperovitz Gilat and others from the Alperovitz family she could not remember their first names.)
Later on she went to the Knahinina camp and she received food there from Zalman Uri Gurevitz. Eilat click for her story
- Wednesday, April 23, 2003 at 12:36:04 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------ Memories of Solomon son of Orchik Alperovich - Jewish life in Kurenetz after the Holocaust: I was born in "shtetle" Kurenetz – (Belorus) in 1948, and I wish to share my own memories and stories that I heard and remember from the Jewish natives about the Jewish life in Kurenetz and it's surroundings. After the liberation of Belarus including Kurenetz, in 1944, the Jewish people started returning to the area. Kurenetz was almost completely destroyed and burned by the retreating German Army. Only a few houses were left standing. most of the surviving Jews migrated to Palestine and the United States in the next few years. My father, Alperovich Aaron Abramovich (Orchik son of Abram, grandson of Chaim- Isar born in kurenets 1896- died in Kurenets 1974) returned home, to Kurenetz, from Saransk (Mordva) were he was sent in 1939 (when the Soviets came to the area) by the decision of Stalin’s Court for 5 years of hard labor. When he returned he found no home nor family. His wife Mirel and 3 of his children (Chaim Isar, another son and a daughter) were murdered. From the local residents and the Jews who returned from the forest, he found out that his older son Yakov (Yankel) joined the partisans during the war and that he was recruited to "Belpolk" – a Red Army unit that was supposed to search and clean the Belarus forests from Nazis soldiers and local collaborators (politzais) that were now replacing the Jews and hiding there. Father finally found Yakov near Minsk. he was very skinny and very tired. He learned from him that his daughter Lisa and his son Samuil also survived and that during the war they also joined the partisan’s ranks. Yankel Orchik story is well known and told in many books. In Simchat Torah of 1941 his family was taken to be killed . his mother was able to escape with the younger kids while they walked to the forest. Yankel and his brother Chaim Isar where taken with the other Jewish men. the men were put in groups of ten and killed while many of the local population was looking. Just before it was Yankle turn to be killed he say that Yente nee dinerstein Rodanski was let go by the Germans and was told to never marry a communist again (They just killed her husband Velvel Rodansky.
Yankel realized that not all are equal and demanded to speak before he is killed. The German officer let him talk. Yankle said in broken German "Before I am to be killed I would like to know if my sin is being a Jew or being a communist?" the officer answered "clearly for being a communist" Yankle said while turning to the local people " they could all tell you that my father Orchik was sent to Siberia for being an enemy to the soviet people, why would I then become a communist?" The officer liked what he said and maybe it was the broken German that made him laugh- he told him to stand to the side. Yankle said that his sick brother should be let go first and they let Chaim Isar go. Yankel did not trast the Germans and together with the sons of Pinia Alperovitz he escaped to the woods. They were killed. Yankel survived and later Joined the partisan and saved many many Jews from Kurenets and Myadel and also his brother Shmuil. In 1944 my mother, Botwinnik Evgeniya Samuilovna (Zelda daughter of Shmuil Botwinnik born in 1920 in rakov) came to Kurenetz. After her release from partisans she looked for her relatives. She found out that all her family was killed in Rakov. She moved to Kurenetz following some of her Jewish friends from the partisans. And that is how to lonely people met each other and established a family. At first they lived in the house of Aaron’s brother Hirsh who was killed with his entire family (wife and two children). Here in August of 1946 their first son Abram was born. At that time Arye Leibe (Lior's grandfather), the brother of Aaron returned from evacuation to Russia, also their two sisters Hava and Feiga returned after being partisans during the war. They all married and started their own families. My father moved to a new house of his own, that he build with his own hands, he left the old house for his brother Leibe And sister Hava.
In July of 1948 in the new house, a new citizen of Kurenetz was born – that was I. About my birth I will tell you the following story:
My mother felt that she is about to give birth so my father took her to the Vileyka’s hospital what was 8 k.m. Away, riding on a horse. However it was too early, and after one day in the hospital she asked to be taken home because she had a lot of work to do there. And so my father brought her back. A few days later he had to set the horse again to take mother to the hospital. This time she was left there for several days, while my father had to return home to take care of the housekeeping chores. A Few days passed and then a fellow Kurinitz resident by the name of Nikolay met my father and told him:" Vorchik, I’ve visited my wife in the hospital and saw your Zelda. You have a boy". Father took a horse and went to meet us. Mother asked to go home right away so father took of his jacket, put me inside and brought me home. That is how my life in Kurenetz begun. At that time almost every Jewish family in Kurenetz had a new born. In Kurenetz after the war remained about 15 Jewish families. On Saturdays and at Jewish holidays Jewish people were gathering at the old Leizer Shulman house. There they had their prayers and after the religious ceremony they were drinking "lehaim". We, kids, played outside the house, and never forgot that Leizer had an apple orchard. We, all the Jewish kids, were raised together among the other gentile kids – together we went to the river and to the forest. Sometimes we had our fights. During winter we would build snow forts and have snowball battles. Starting at the age of 7, every kid in kurenets would attend school,there we met with new duties and challenges and made new friends.

In 1955-6 many of the Jews Kurenetsers started moving to Poland in order to continue their way to Israel. Since Kurenets was part of Poland before 1939 the Soviets let the old Polish citizens cross the border to Poland. The first family to take that step was my father’s sister Hava and her husband Boris, with their 5 children. The oldest child was 7 years old and the youngest – Sholom, less than a year. I still remember his Brit Milah ceremony – all Jews of Kurenetz gathered together in the small room and then came the rabbi. All Jews raised the money to pay for his services. That how the last Jewish child was born In Kurenetz, and that happened in 1955. Many families followed that path, moving directly to Poland or to the larger cities in order to fix the needed papers and then move to Poland. So in 1958 only two Jewish families were left in Kurenetz: Levin’s and ours. But the Jewish life didn’t stand still. At every holiday the older children of my father would visit us with their children. Also we kept in touch with the Jews in the nearby villages: Dolginovo (4 families), Lyuban’ (7 families) and Vileyka (about 15 families). The spiritual leader of the remaining Jews was Mironovich (Finkelshteyn – Tewel) the head of Lyuban sovhoz. In 1958 a new school director arrived to Kurenets – Catznelson. He lived in Kurenetz till 1963. The head doctor of the Kurenetz regional hospital was Dr. Nasis. He lived in Kurenetz from 1960 till 1966. They both had children younger then school age. At the Kurenetz public school between the years 1958 – 1966 only two Jewish kids studied: me, and my older brother, Abram. Despite this we never felt excluded and participated in all kinds of social activities along with the other students we went dancing and training. Abram even won regional championship in throwing the discus. We participated in all night parties in the nearby villages and hanged around with boys and girls of our age, but what we were missing was the Jewish friends.
Abraham finished school in 1964 and went to Brest to study pedagogy. I finished school two years later in 1966 and went to Minsk to study engineering, but it didn’t mean that we left Kurenetz. Every holiday we returned to visit our parents. After finishing my studies in 1971 I returned to Vileisky region to work. I was the head engineer of kolhoz, and later a regional agriculture machinery engineer. At that time my brother Abraham was already math teacher in Vileiky’s school. Almost all Jewish kids of the Vileiky region got high education.
Soon Abraham got married and moved to Tallinn (Estonia).
In 1974 my father passed away. It happened in January, and it was very cold outside, but still many Jewish and also local (goy) populations came to give him their final respects. Among the locals he was a well-known authority. Every one who had to sell or to buy a cow went to Aharon ("Vorchik") to ask for help in advice or even in shortage of money. I still remember how some of our Russian neighbors cried at the funeral and kissed his legs. My mother and I, in 1975, sold our house and left Kurenetz and moved to Tallinn. I would still come to Kurenetz for visits; one time, it was in 1981, I went there after getting married, just after the wedding ceremony, together with my wife we flew to visit my father’s grave. At that time I learned from the local non-Jewish citizens who still remain there that they are all called "Vorchiks" by the near by villagers- that’s how deep and lasting was they memory of the last Jewish family that lived in Kurenetz. After us, there was only one Jewish family left in Kurenetz – Levin Issak and Jeniya. Issak passed away in 1990 at the age of 90, and his wife moved to Svetlogorsk to live with her sister. Before leaving The USSR and moving to Israel, in 1989 my brother Abram and I visited Kurenetz and our oldest brother Jacob (Yankel) who lived in Molodechno and worked not far from Kurenetz – in sovhoz Liuban with Mironovich. He organized a placement of a memorial at graves of those who died in the Holocaust. At this visit in Kurenetz we met our old neighbor Felsher Shuberty (born in 1918). While talking to him we found out that he was a Jew, something that we didn’t know before. We lived nearby since 1956 until 1975, went to school together with his children and didn’t know of him being a Jew. So since 1990, he is the last Jewish settler in Kurenetz, he is the one who welcomes the visitors who arrive to Kurenetz and he is the one taking care of the Jewish graveyard. My brother Abram and I live happily with our families in Israel for already 10 years. Our brother Yacob also immigrated to Israel but he passed away in 1996. My other brother Samuil is still living in Belarus.
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- Sunday, April 13, 2003 at 18:41:25 (PDT)
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NINTH FORT: Site in Kovno, Lithuania, of mass slaughter of Jews. Between 1941-1944, over 50,000 people were killed and buried there. Most of the victims were Jews from Kovno and deportees from Germany. Jews slave laborers were used to obliterate traces of the mass murder, by burning corpses. 64 prisoners escaped and joined the Jewish partisans
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- Sunday, April 13, 2003 at 18:35:39 (PDT)
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At first I was sent by the Judenrat to work in the army camp near Bogdonova. I worked there baking bread for the Germans and from there I was transferred to the army camp in Podberze. Together with me all the time there was another Vishnevan girl by the name of Chana Podversky, the daughter of Itza-Lebl Podversky. The usual procedure was that every Sunday we would go home and the German commandant treated us almost like a father. He had six daughters and he always emphasized that fact and loved to converse with us. Most of the times when we would go home he would drive us in his car so he could take some food supplies for my family. At more than one occasion he entered our home and saw with his own eyes the suffering of my parents. With tears in their eyes they begged him to save me and my sister Raisel. He promised he would do whatever he could.
On that awful Sunday he also took us as usual to our house and as we neared the gate of the ghetto, we saw thousands of Christians gathering around one of the homes. We also saw a dark haze and smoke reaching up to the skies, and there were screams. At first we thought it was some Christian person who had died, and my friend and I whispered to each other, “They deserve it” or something like this. But when we came closer to the ghetto gate, a Christian woman stopped the car and screamed as loud as she could, “In the name of God, get out of here. In town they are slaughtering all the Jews.”
The commandant and the soldier said to us, “Immediately get out of the car and run to your work place. We will go inside the gate and see what is happening there.”
When they returned they told us that when they arrived there the SS people who were surrounding the town forced them to take part in the annihilation and the killing of all the Jews of the town. And that was not all; they ordered them to bring us there to be killed, and if they didn’t the commandant would be punished. The soldier who was with him the entire day witnessing the torture told us what he saw with tears in his eyes. From all the awful sights he saw he now was vomiting and had diarrhea the entire day.
The commandant immediately told us he would not give us up no matter what. He suggested that for this night we sleep there but early in the morning we must run to one of the Christians that we knew and he would keep in touch with us. We did as he told us and we reached the Christian man and hid in his house for a few days but when things became more dangerous since the SS troops looked for us everywhere including where we worked, and in the sheds, and in the place we were hiding. It was a miracle they didn’t find us. So he transferred us to a Polish woman’s house where we hid for 6 weeks. At the end the Christian man made a communication between us and the Jews from Kerve who would go to work in Bogdonova. Since now the Jews of Vishnevo were annihilated and a few others went to the forest. So now they were replaced in Bogdonova.
Now he told us that at one time when they returned from work to Kerve, they should take us with them. The person who drove them was a Jew named Shlomo Horwitz, a native of Kerve, who now lives in KFar Vitkin (1970). Shlomo Horwitz did as he was told and let us go in the car and we arrived in the ghetto of Kerve. I must emphasize that the situation in the ghetto of Kerve was different from that of most of the neighboring towns’ ghetto. Their commandant truly defended them and he lived in the ghetto. He knew everything that was done and everything they planned to do. They didn’t hide anything from him, and he took care of all the people who wanted to annihilate them. Whenever the people above him asked him to annihilate the Jews, he said he needed his Jews because that they still hadn’t finished building the roads or the airport that he planned to build near the town. And as others told, the Sunday when the Jews of Vishnevo were annihilated, he was with all his Jews who worked in Bogdonova and Vishnevo, and he was witness to the massacre of the Jews of Vishnevo. He succeeded in saving the lives of his Jews from the SS, claiming that they were very needed workers.
As soon as he found out about us, and he found out about us immediately since he lived with the Jews in the ghetto, he called us and told us about the destruction of the Jews of our town, and all that he saw with his own eyes.
“You were left alone and orphaned. You must do everything to stay alive so you can tell the future generations what they did to the Jews of Vishnevo.” He also told us, while deeply sighing, as if it was his own terrible tragedy, “I am also an orphan and have been one since I was a little child, with no mother and father, alone in the world. It was only because I had such a strong desire and stubbornness to survive no matter what, that I am alive today.”
He knew that people didn’t want us in the ghetto, so he ended the conversation by saying, “I will defend you and find you some shelter.” He gave us some food supplies and said that we should come to him if we had any trouble.
As I said before the fate of the Jews of Kerve was very different from the others’, and they did not experience tragedy at that point. But finally, when most of the jobs were done, many were spread out to different working camps. Most went to the camp in Zazmir. At one point we were also sent by the Judenrat of Kerve to this camp instead of two local Jewish guys whose turn it was to be sent. Here there were thousands of people, remnants of ghettoes from Oshmina, Svir, Kerve, and other towns that were destroyed or were waiting to be destroyed. They were busy with paving roads, so Nachamka and I also worked on paving roads. We were barefoot and starving with torn clothes and we worked at this hard labor until we became sick with typhus, which was spreading throughout the camp. After two weeks of very high fever we knew that we would survive and our fever finally broke. Slowly we felt better and again we were sent to work.
Here there was a very tough survival situation. People were starving. There was a very limited food supply, and the Germans were very cruel. They would torture us even while waiting to get food supplies. We would stand in line and they would come and slap us and hit us with their hands and with their rubber bats. After a few months there, this camp was also shut down and the workers were transferred to different places, some to the Kovno ghetto, others to Vilna’s, and the older ones were annihilated.
First we were sent to Kovno and then to the camp in Kosoder. Here we worked in mines. The guards of this camp were Ukrainian and Russian “volunteers” (they were also prisoners). They were allowed to carry weapons and every time they received weapons there they would take it out of the cars. They treated us sort of rough, but it wasn’t torturous. Whenever they saw us they would say to us, “Why aren’t you trying to escape or fight the Germans?” They couldn’t understand why we, the Jewish people, were letting the Germans torture us like this.
“Why weren’t we trying to escape from the camp?”
We didn’t answer them because we were suspicious they were just messengers for the Germans. One of them was a very large, strong man. He was cruel and mean to us, but once when I met him he said to me, “Why aren’t you running to the forest?” I didn’t answer, but one night, when we were already asleep after a day of hard labor, we heard sounds of shooting and explosives. We woke up in panic and when we came outside we saw a sight that for us looked like a scene from hell: all the barbed wire that surrounded our camp was destroyed and the Germans, headed by the commander from a neighboring camp, surrounded us, standing one behind the other with rifles ready to shoot. When they saw us (the Jews) the commander said, “Stay in your places. If you are quiet no harm will come to you.”
The next day we found out what had happened: the Russian and Ukrainian “volunteers” who always spoke to us about escaping and revolting, they planned to do the same thing themselves. So one day, when they were sent to unload a large amount of weapons, they took the weapons and they killed the commandant. They cut all the barbed wire around and ran to the forest. Months later we met with them again in the forest when we did the same thing. This deed by the so-called “volunteers” didn’t pass without a deep impression on us. This symbolized what we should do in the future. But at this point we continued to work until days of selection and annihilation arrived at the camp. First they took the old people, and once they were killed they took the middle-aged people and only the younger people stayed. Before we left they started taking out the children, pulling them out of their parents’ arms. In this camp there were many families with children.
I still remember the Jew who was the gruppefuhrer, a Jew from Czechoslovakia, very intelligent and clever who spoke perfect German and English. The Germans ordered him to bring the children, who they pretended they were going to take to a special camp, but the parents didn’t trust them and they were very suspicious that the children would be sent to be killed. Fearing that fate, they went to the gruppefuhrer and begged him to talk to the Germans to cancel their order. He immediately explained that he had already begged and there was nothing he could do, and that they would not listen to him. When finally he couldn’t take their begging anymore, he was the first to give his adopted son to the Germans.
“There is nothing I can do,” he said to the parents who surrounded him.
At that moment he became unrecognizable. His face whitened and he fainted, falling to the ground. When we saw the sending of the children, the young people, men and women of the camp, about 40 to 50 people, decided that we must immediately escape. While we were sent to take supplies off the trains outside the camp we escaped. Several times shortly before the escape we met some partisans who came to the area and encouraged us to escape to the forest and join them. When we decided we immediately contacted them and escaped to the forest. Here we met with a Russian partisan unit by the name of Zafubiada, and together with them we became a partisan group by the name Zasvabada. This was sometime at the end of 1943. We had contacts with Moscow and following their instructions we carried out sabotage missions against the Germans.
The year of 1944 came and the Russians were rapidly approaching our area. An order came from Moscow that we should attack the Germans from behind their lines, and that’s what we did. Finally, one day we met up with the Red Army at about a distance of one and a half days from Vilna. We received a lot of weapons from them, and together with them we entered the city of Vilna.
The city was almost entirely destroyed. Thousands of bodies were lying on the streets. There were very fierce battles between the Russians and Germans until the Germans retreated to the border and from there to Berlin with the Russians following them. But in the Vilna area there were still small groups of German troops hiding in bunkers, and together with the regular Red Army we fought them and killed them one by one.
After a few months in Vilna when there was already regular civil authority in this part of the Soviet Union we returned to Vishnevo. Here we met with Gdaliyau Dudman and Kokin who came earlier. Together we went to the killing field. The entire area was filled with bones and we ordered the Christian people to put a fence around it. We dug graves for our brothers and put their bones inside. On top of the grave we put a memorial made of stone. We stood next to it and with tears in our eyes said goodbye to our dear ones.
From Vishenevo we moved to Volozhin and started working for the civil service. But slowly we were more and more determined that we must leave the area that was the valley of death for millions of our brothers. We must go to Israel. The atmosphere around us was filled with hate and poisonous anti-Semitism. Secretly we left Volozhin to go to Bialystock, and from there to go to Krakow. We were there on May 8, 1945 when the announcement was made of the end of the war. From here we continued to Warsaw and from there to Lublin where we crossed the border to Hungary. From there to Romania, to Bucharest. After travel for half a year, finally we left in a Romanian ship going to Israel, arriving on the 26th of October, 1945.
Here in Israel through all the years we kept meeting with all the people we met in the ghettoes and in the camps and who succeeded in coming to Israel. Two years ago we met in Israel the Czechoslovakian Jew who was our gruppefuhrer. He told us that after our group fled to the forest, the rest of the camp was annihilated and that he was sent to the ninth fort in Kovno , an underground bunker. Here they would take all the Jews who were murdered in the surrounding area to be burned. The people who burned the bodies were Jews who were all the time shackled so they would not escape. Only very few, he amongst them, were able to escape from there. When he was finally free he left for the US. In the US he became a wealthy and respected person.
We spent the evening talking to him about memories from those dark days. We drank “L’chaim” for Israel and the Jewish nation that outlived Hitler and we hoped that all the haters of Zion would find the same fate.
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- Sunday, April 13, 2003 at 18:29:04 (PDT)
------------------------------------------------------------------------ Carl of Krasnoye weds
childhood sweetheart

This story is about the man who married the youngest sister of Morris Rubenstein. Drafted to fight in World War One, Carl Karben was starving with the Czar's troops in Minsk, when he went AWOL to search for something to eat. Carl was shipped off to Siberia after he was caught and put to work making straw sleeping mats for the army. Then he bought a pill to make himself sick ... Bur let's start from the beginning ...
In 1918, Carl and Dora married, but they did not leave for America until 1923. Their story, based on extensive interviews with both of them in 1967 and 1973, is our most extensive account of the family's life in Europe.
Many of our family, including other children of Usher and of his brother, Lazar Elia, arrived on these shores well before this story begins. Later research has uncovered some of their stories. Hirschel Uberstein, Carl's father-in-law, stayed in Gorodok and was killed by ''pogromistas'' [thugs or outlaws] about 1929, according to my father, Larry Rogers.Morris emigrates
Hirschel and his wife, the former Rivka Hyman, may well have had several more children than the five who eventually found their way to the United States. Pressed by the threat of the draft, Morris, the oldest of those who came, was the first to arrive. The year was 1901, although 1905 is the year of arrival indicated on his death certificate. Japan was soon to attack Russian-controlled Port Arthur (now called Lu-shun), initiating the Russo-Japanese War on the Pacific coast over 4,200 miles to the east of Minsk.
Dora stays
Dora, younger than my grandfather Morris by some 15 years, was still a toddler when Morris left for America. So of course she would remain at home with her parents. Our focus is on the period of Carl and Dora's life together. While their story in America is one of success and a full and good life, our narrative centers on their environment in Russia, including Carl's many brushes with danger and his family's numerous frightening experiences. From Krasnoye to Gorodok
Carl and Dora knew each other from the time they were children. Carl was about 10 years old when he was sent from his village, Krasnoye (Kraz-nick), to neighboring Gorodok (Horr-o-duck), 8.9 miles southwest. It had been arranged that he study there for his Bar Mitzvah and live in the home of his teacher....
click here for the rest
- Sunday, April 13, 2003 at 14:39:49 (PDT)
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DISCOVER BELARUS Icon Painting
DURATION: 4 DAYS

DAY 1
Arrive in Minsk. Check-in at "Oktyabrskaya", "Belarus", "Yubileynaya", "Planeta" or "Orbita" hotel.
City tour feautures the historic part of the city - Troitskoye Predmestye (Trinity Suburb), Russian Orthodox church and Catholic Cathedral. Tourists will have a close look at the ICON PAINTING section of the local Arts Museum. Visit to the Museum of Ancient Belarusian Culture, Ethnography and Folklore (Belarusian Academy of Sciences) featuring weaving, embroidery, icon painting and wood-carving. Folklore concert "Presentation of Belarus". Foreign tourists make acquaintance of the spirit of the Belarusian people, which finds its reflection in folklore, folk traditions and customs.
DAY 2
One day trip by coach to orthodox churches in Krasnoye (60 km from Minsk) and in Molodechno (80 km from Minsk). Meeting the Belarusian artists - painters and restores. Evening tasting of national dishes and drinks (Optional).
DAY 3
Full day trip to the village of Zhirovitsa (190 km from Minsk) features Holy Monastery of Assumption (17th century), the Convent of the Nativity of the Virgin, the Theological Seminary. Lunch in the monastery. Return to Minsk.
DAY 4
Visit to Logoisk orthodox church (40 km from Minsk).
On the way back excursion to Folk Arts and Crafts Museum in Raubichi (20 km from Minsk). Displayed in the former Krestogorskaya Church (18th century) are folk costumes, fine fabrics, articles made of straw, pottery, wearing, wood-carving, icon painting.
Gala dinner in the hotel restaurant or outside the city.

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- Sunday, April 13, 2003 at 14:30:20 (PDT)
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Hi, Me and a friend are planning to visit Prokofiev's birthplace, the village of Krasnoye (was Sontsovka). We have got trains to Donets'k and now neet directions to Krasnoye. Any maps/directions would be greatly appreciated. We are in Donetsk on 12th July 2003, so if you too are there, and would like to help us get to Krasnoye, that too would be fantastic! Thank You all Adam Just to let you all know that we have found many resources on the location of Krasnoye. We will be travelling by train from Donetsk to Krasnoarmiisk, then by taxi to krasnoye. We will send photos and let you all know how the trip went! Thanks Adam Dobson Adam
Just a quick note to say all is well with the trip. My friend and I are very excited about the visit to S.P's birthplace, that is if we ever get there (Krasnoye is so out of the way). If anyone needs any info, maps, directions or would like us to take some photos, please let me know. Adam

Krasnoye Syelo, Minsk uezd, Minsk gubernia
was a private possession of local bishop of Roman Catholic Church in the Great Lithuanian Princedom. 1568 - 1775 - Krasnoye Syelo was a center of Subdistrict in Minsk Province of the Great Lithuanian Princedom. Jewish ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/Economic/KRSELSUM.html - 6.4KB





------------------------------------------------------------------------ From: CarriganJ
To: EilatGordn Any idea -- a Jewish immigrant cites, "Nzda, Russia" as his birthplace in his immigration petition. Born in 1886. Petition in 1916.
Gratefully,
Joan Carrigan
Subj: Re: "Nzda"= Uzda
Date: 4/3/03 5:43:38 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: EilatGordn
To: CarriganJ Uzda, Igumen uezd, Minsk gubernia, Latitude: 5327' Longitude: 2713'
JewishGen Family Finder Surname Town Country LastUpdated Researcher (JGFF Code)
Slutsky Uzda Belarus Before 1997 Carole Frieband (#1193)
7 Murphy Circle
Framingham, MA
01701
United States Borishanski Uzda Belarus 13 Jan 1998 Jim Bennett (#1852)
48 Vitkin Street
Haifa, 34754
Israel
Pincus Uzda Belarus 24 Jul 1998 Sharlene Kranz (#2271)
4336 Albemarle St. NW
Washington, DC
20016
United States Kivowitz Uzda Belarus 26 Dec 2001 Vivian E. Shore Zelvin (#5689)
3 Douglas Place
Eastchester, NY
10709
United States Merliss Uzda Belarus 5 Feb 1997 Sharon G. Broniatowski (#6232)
Merlis Uzda Belarus 26 Oct 2000
Palay Uzda Belarus 22 Jan 1998 Norman Paley (#10368)
171 Purdy Ave
Staten Island
Staten Island, NY
10314
United States Paley Uzda Belarus 22 Jan 1998
Polay Uzda Belarus 22 Jan 1998
Olshevsky Uzda Belarus 5 Feb 1998 Howard S. Zinn (#10685)
27 Heritage Dr.
Freehold, NJ
07728
United States Grinshpan Uzda Belarus 5 Feb 1998
Greenberg Uzda Belarus 5 Feb 1998
Kantorowitz Uzda Belarus 5 Feb 1998
Greenspan Uzda Belarus 19 Sep 2002
Picus Uzda Belarus 8 Feb 1998 A. Abramov (#10747)
14 Astor Ct
Princeton, NJ
08540
United States Greenberg Uzda Belarus 19 Jun 1998 Alan Gass (#11488)
602 South Harrison Lane
Denver, CO
80209
United States Kaplan Uzda Belarus 19 Jun 1998
Usdansky Uzda Belarus 21 Jul 1998 Steven Usdansky (#14589)
Pickus Uzda Belarus 8 Nov 1998 Michael Michael Margolin (#18072)
333 East 53rd St.
Apt. 7G
New York, NY
10022-4914
United States Margolin Uzda Belarus 8 Nov 1998
Picus Uzda Belarus 8 Nov 1998
Rosofsky Uzda Belarus 8 Nov 1998
Kantrowitz Uzda Belarus 8 Mar 1997 Sy Pearlman (#18819)
Levine Uzda Belarus 28 Nov 1998
Kunofsky Uzda Belarus 8 Mar 1997
Kunofsky Uzda Belarus 15 Jul 2002 Harris Adam Kunofsky (#22367)
Kivovitch Uzda Belarus 31 Dec 2000 Judith Kivow Burger (#26663)
Usdane Uzda Belarus 18 Oct 1999 Bernice Usdane (#34873)
Kantor Uzda Belarus 23 Oct 1999 David Speicher (#35121)
Baskin Uzda Belarus 24 Nov 1999 Solomon Borodkin (#35690)
300 Winston Dr.
Apt.1608
Cliffside Park, NJ
07010
United States Borodkin Uzda Belarus 20 Nov 1999
Levine Uzda Belarus 24 Nov 1999
Pincus Uzda Belarus 6 Nov 1999 Lillian Kreisle (#35691)
Kantorowitz Uzda Belarus 6 Nov 1999
Margolin Uzda Belarus 23 Nov 1999 Neal Dorf (#36342)
Israelovich Uzda Belarus 16 Mar 2000 Fred H. Martin (#40972)
Israel Uzda Belarus 16 Mar 2000
Bernshtein Uzda Belarus 31 Jul 2000 Paul Goldberg (#46852)
3821 Woodley Rd. NW
Washington, DC
20016
United States Soloway Uzda Belarus 15 Aug 2000 Gail Levin (#47441)
Box E-1020 Baruch College
17 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY
10010
United States Gimelshteyn Uzda Belarus 28 Aug 2000 Doris & Lee Hoenig (#48041)
Himmelstein Uzda Belarus 28 Aug 2000
Horowitz Uzda Belarus 11 Sep 2000 Sara Harris (#48562)
Berkowitz Uzda Belarus 16 May 2001 Ann Bar-Neder (#58666)
Pikus Uzda Belarus 17 Jan 2002 Dorothea W. Rose (#59506)
Konovsky Uzda Belarus 11 Oct 2001 Vicki Polansky (#64344)
Bornstein Uzda Belarus 10 Feb 2003 Click HERE to contact Researcher #66927
Boskin Uzda Belarus 21 Jan 2002 Michael Pincus (#67558)
Pincus Uzda Belarus 21 Jan 2002
Zubarev Uzda Belarus 1 Feb 2002 Click HERE to contact Researcher #67921
Vicdorchik Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002 Roberta Farris (#73967)
5401 Blake Road
Edina, MN
55436
United States Wigdorchik Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002
Bornstein Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002
Golper Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002
Brustine Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002
Zagar Uzda Belarus 10 Oct 2002
Siegel Uzda Belarus 1 Nov 2002 Click HERE to contact Researcher #74461
Magilenski Uzda Belarus 1 Nov 2002
Kaplan Uzda Belarus 6 Jan 2003 Muriel Feldman (#74515)
Kantrowitz Uzda Belarus 6 Jan 2003
Winoker Uzda Belarus 17 Feb 2003 Click HERE to contact Researcher #76926
Uzda, on river Uzdzianka (a tributary of Usa), 75 km from Minsk, is known since the middle of 15th century. There are a lot of legends connected with the name of this small city (Belarussian - miastechka, Yiddish - shtetl). According to one of the legend, Slav troops defeated tatar`s army of Koidan. Koidan was wounded and felt off hourse, caught a bridle (Belarussian - Uzda) and said: "The death met me here".
Since XVI century Uzda was a possession of Kaviachinski (famous belarussian kalvinists) family, in XVIII century - Zafisha family and after this of duke Krasinski. During the existance of Rech Paspalitaya (a union between Polish kingdom and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania) Uzda was a part of Minsk Voevodstvo.
Jews lived in Uzda since the second quater of 17th century. In 1765 Uzda kagal (community) has 263 jews.
In 1793 Russian troops occupied Uzda. Under Russian rule Uzda was a center of volast in Igumen uezd of Minsk gubernia. 1618 jews lived in Uzda in 1847. The results of the famous russian census of 1897 for Uzda were: 2756 inhabitants - 2.068 of them jews.
Russian geographer V.P. Semionov wrote in his "Rossija. Polnoe gographicheskoe opisanie nashego Otechestva" (Russia. Full gepgraphical description of our Motherland) in the begining of the 20th century: "The majority of Uzda population are jews. They have a synagogue".
The main jewish occupations in Uzda were: trade and handicraft. Jews took an active role in UZda trade, They bought in Minsk or Staubcy wine, groceries and sold this products in Uzda. Also, they bought in Uzda region agricultural products: flour, fat, groats, honey, flax and sold it in Minsk and Stoubcy. In the end of XVIII - XIX century a real center of a shtetl was a Rynachnaya (Market) square. Here were a lot of small jewish stores, houses of merchants and craftsmen. Uzda had a fair every Sunday. Also,
in shtetl were several mills, a hospital, since 1890 - a chemist`s shop, since 1894 - post and telegraph-office. The majority of jewish craftsmen were the shoe-makers and tailors. The biggest Uzda plants were alcohol-plant "Uzdzianka", flour-grind plant "Zakreushchina" and so on.
After World War I, Feberuary and Bolshevik revolutions German troops (February-November 1918) and Polish (August 1919 - July 1920) occupied Uzda. Polish troops organized here a bloody jewish pogrom.
According to the Riga treaty of 1921 Uzda was a Soviet town. Since July, 1924, Uzda was a region in Minsk akruga, since 1938 - in Minsk oblast. Jews were 62.5 % of Uzda population. They had a school in Yiddish. In 1938 Uzda had 3.500 inhabitants.
On the 22th of June, 1941, Nazi Germany invaded Soviet Union. On the 28th of July german troops occupied Uzda. They organized a ghetto. 1740 Uzda jews were killed. It was the end of more then 300 years of Uzda jewish history.
Soviet troops liberated Uzda on 4th of July, 1944.

Surname, Given Name Father, GrandfatherMother, GrandfatherMother Maiden Surname Date of BirthHebrew Date TownUyezdGubernia Comments Place RegisteredYearRecord MicrofilmFrameArchive/Fond
APFOTOR, Rubin Mordukh, Shmuila Feiga, Iudel' 9/1/1882 1 shvat Minsk Minsk Minsk Father from Uzdensk [Uzda]. Rabbi KHANALESS Minsk 1882 M20 1920795 15 NHAB/1226/2/27
BAS'KIN, Abram-Moisei Vul'f, Tsalel Keilia, Abram-Movsha 6/12/1912 Teives 9 Rubezhevichi Minsk Minsk father from Uzden' [Uzda] Rubezhevichi 1912 M8 1920795 676 NHAB/1226/2/44
BERSHTEIN, Nota Zalman, Aizik Khaia, Nevakh 17/7/1882 13 ov Minsk Minsk Minsk Father from Uzda. Rabbi KHANALESS Minsk 1882 M331 1920795 104 NHAB/1226/2/27
CHERNI, Itska-Josel' Movsha, Itska Khana-Mikhlia, Mordukh 5/7/1882 10 ov Minsk Minsk Minsk Rabbi KHANALESS, Father from Uzda Minsk 1882 M310 1920795 99 NHAB/1226/2/27
KONTOROVICH, Rivka Khaim-Leib, Abram-Itska Lifsha, Berk 14/2/1882 7 ador Minsk Minsk Minsk Father from Uzda Minsk 1882 F64 1920795 32 NHAB/1226/2/27
LEVIN, Ovsei-Lazer Leizer, Evkha Rivka, Itska 4/3/1882 25 ador Minsk Minsk Minsk Father from Uzda. Rabbi KHANALESS Minsk 1882 M122 1920795 46 NHAB/1226/2/27
RABINOVICH, Khaia-Gitlia Srol'-Noson, Nokhum-Leib Beilia, Vul'f 8/2/1882 1 ador Minsk Minsk Minsk Father from Uzda Minsk 1882 F57 1920795 28 NHAB/1226/2/27
SHAPIRO, Doba Srol, Movsha Sheina-Risia, Dovid-Berka 10/9/1912 Tishre 12 Rubezhevichi Minsk Minsk father from Uzda Rubezhevichi 1912 F6 1920795 674 NHAB/1226/2/44

Subj: Re: "Nzda"= Uzda
Date: 4/3/03 6:43:29 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: CarriganJ
To: EilatGordn
Thanks more than I can say. This research was for a surprise 70th birthday present for the grandson of a couple from Uzda. He has no idea where his family came from other than "Russia." In the note you sent, not only did you identify the town but both his family name and the name of his paternal grandmother are recorded in Uzda. To have located all this and to realize its history -- what a lovely thing you have done.
Sincerely,
Joan Carrigan
.
- Thursday, April 03, 2003 at 20:13:40 (PST)
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Samuel SHEPSONWOHL
Children:
1. Frances H. SHEPSONWHOL Spouse: Max CHAIT Children:
----Rebecca CHAIT Born: 5 Jul 1883, Russia, Gorodak. Married: Jan 1940. Died: 28 Jun 1966, Cleveland, Ohio. Spouse: Isaac RESNICK
Born: 1870, Russia Died: 23 Apr 1936, Cleveland, Ohio Children:
////////////Max RESNICK Born: 2 Jul 1906, Cleveland, Ohio. Died: May 1970, Guadalajara, Mexico. /Spouse: Augusta MALINAS, Living
Children:
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Phyllis Ann RESNICK, Living. spouse: Hershel Samuel GUSKY, Living Children:
------------------------------------Laura Susan GUSKY, Living.
-----------------------------------Raymond Lee GUSKY, Living. Spouse: Patricia KRAMER, Living Children:
==============================Leigh Ann GUSKY, Living.
============================Neil Kramer GUSKY, Living.
============================Craig Allen GUSKY, Living
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Harvey Paul RESNICK Born: 12 Apr 1935, Cleveland, Ohio. Died: Jul 1977, Westfield, Cataqua, Ny. Spouse: --------------------------------------Marilyn DAVIS, Living Children:
==========================Craig RESNICK, Living.Spouse: Janice FIORUCCI, Living Children:
==================================Kelsey RESNICK, Living.
=================================Kyle RESNICK, Living.
============================Traci RESNICK
Children:
===========================Aaron RESNICK
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Isabel RESNICK Born: Cleveland, Ohio. Married: California. Spouse: Juan BECERRA Married: Mexico Children:
=========================Terryl Ann BECERRA,
Spouse: Dan WILLIAMSON, Living Children:
=============================Stormy Lynn WILLIAMSON Living
Ruben Sam CHAIT Born: 25 Sep 1892. Died: 28 Mar 1957, Cleveland, Ohio. Children: Ida CHAIT
//////////////Sadie CHAIT Died: 6 Feb 1973, Clevelnd, Ohio. Children:
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Louis DRUCKER Born: 8 Nov 1909. Died: Nov 1998, Cleveland, Ohio. Spouse: Irene DAVIS Born: 14 Oct 1912 Died: Mar 1982, Cleveland, Ohio Children:
=================Donald DRUCKER Born: 1 Sep 1936. Died: 7 Dec 1996, Cleveland, Ohio.
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Ann DRUCKER Born: 30 Jan 1893. Died: Mar 1985, Cleveland, Ohio.
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Laura DRUCKER Spouse: Morris DAVIS Died: 7 Mar 1957, Cleveland, Ohio Children: Bonnie DAVIS
///////////Sarah CHAIT Born: 15 Jan 1878, Poland. Died: 3 Jun 1968, Bangor, Maine. Spouse: Moses SCLAIR Children:
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Samuel SCLAIR
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Judah Leib CHAIT
2. Joseph SHEPSONWHOL Died: 1912. Spouse: Rachel LEVINE
Children:
----Max SHEPSONWHOL Died: 1926.Children:
////////////Rose SHEPSONWHOL
///////////Blank1 SHEPSONWHOL
/////////////Blank Two SHEPSONWHOL
//////////////Blank Three SHEPSONWHOL
----Nathan SHEPSONWHOL Children:
///////////////Rae SHEPSONWHOL
////////////////Essie SHEPSONWHOL
///////////////Milton SHEPSONWHOL
-------Sara SHEPSONWHOL Spouse: BARNETChildren:
///////////////Sam BARNET
////////////////Sade BARNET
///////////////Rose BARNET /
-------Issachar Shepsonwhol Sam COHN Born: 1870. Died: 1926.
/////////////Ruth COHN Spouse: STEINBERG Children:
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Carol STEINBERG
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;Robert STEINBERG
/////////////////Alton COHN Died: 1923.
////////////Gertrude COHN Spouse: AMSTER Children:
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;William AMSTER
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;James AMSTER

Spouse: 2nd WIFE Children:
------Mike SHEPSONWHOL
----Shlame SHEPSONWHOL Died: New York City.
-----Nachem SHEPSONWHOL Died: Florida.
------Laura SHEPSONWHOL Died: Seattle.
-------Fredel SHEPSONWHOL 3. Dobbe SHEPSONWHOL married SCHOENHAUS Children:
----------Anna SCHOENHAUS Spouse: EDELMAN
------------Julia SCHOENHAUS
-----------Min SCHOENHAUS
------------Jane SCHOENHAUS
------------Joe SCHOENHAUS
-----------Laura SCHOENHAUS 4.Dvere SHEPSONWHOL
5. Michel SHEPSONWHOL Born: 1850 Children:
----Barnet SHEPSONWHOL
-----Jacob SHEPSONWHOL
-------Saul SHEPSONWHOL Children:
/////////////////// Melvin SHEPSONWHOL
///////////////////////Herbert SHEPSONWHOL
-------Harry SHEPSONWHOL
-------Lou SHEPSONWHOL Spouse: COLE Children:
//////////////////////Tom COLE
/////////////////////Carol COLE
Barney SHEPSONWHOL Anna (Chana) SCHOENHAUS Died: Newark, Nj
Spouse: Yona KUGEL Died: Minsk, Belarus Children:
1.Joseph (Yosef) KUGEL Born: Bef 1877. Spouse: Rose
Born: Kaunas Or Siauli, Lithuania Children:
--------Lillian (Zlatta Leah) KUGEL
--------------Barry (Boruch Yonah) KUGEL
2.Leah (Rochel Leah) KUGEL Born: 1878. Died: Newark, Nj ( Imm. Ca. 190. Spouse: Solomon (Shlomo) STEIN Born: Abt 1871Died: Newark, Nj Children:
------------John (Yona) STEIN Born: 1896. Died: Franklin Lakes, Ny.Spouse: Anna (Chana) SHACHAT
Born: 1902, Newark, Nj Children:
Ellen Sylvia (Ester STEIN Born: 1923. Died: West Orange, Nj. Children:
Susan Beth (Frima HIRSCHHORN
Robert Ellis (Yisrael HIRSCHHORN



Beatrice "Becky" STEIN Spouse: (Male) PASHKOW Children:
(Female) PASHKOW
Herbert PASHKOW Harry (Aaron) KUGEL Spouse: Fannie (Feigl) HOCHSTEIN
Born: Radoszkowice, Russia

Children:
Julie (Yehudis) KUGEL Spouse: Herman SCHNIPPER Children:
Rochelle SCHNIPPPER
(Female) SCHNIPPER



Fannie (Feiga Pesha) KUGEL Born: 1888, Minsk, Belarus. Spouse: Isaac "Ike" (Yitzchok) SLAVIN
Born: Samke ( Near), Belaurs Children:
John (Yonah) SLAVIN
Marvin (Mordechai) SLAVIN
Minnie SHEPSONWHOL Spouse: MEYERSON Children:
Irwin MEYERSON
Ruth MEYERSON
Sanford MEYERSON
Lawrence MEYERSON
Dorothy MEYERSON
Annete MEYERSON







.
- Sunday, March 30, 2003 at 21:39:34 (PST)
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Dear Eilat, Just two lines to thank you for your great work in the shtetl pages. I am
in contact several times a year with other Alperovich and variants in
Argentina. Pedro, whose family is from Kurenets, and who has kept in
contact with your page after I helped him reach it for the first time (and
where he suddenly found his family pictures!) and Ben Ami, a member of an
Alperovich family in our Tucuman province, whose father was from Vileyka.
I have still not reached Kurenets... My own genealogical research is almost
postponed because I am researching for other people and always several
eMails behind schedule! - butI hope to uncover some day the link of my
Alperoviches to Kurenetz - and to my fellow Alperovich.
Warm regards, Carlos
Buenos Aires
.
- Sunday, March 30, 2003 at 19:20:40 (PST)
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I spoke with Zila Zilburg in Rishon Lezion (phone # 03-9647532). Zila was born in Radoshkovichi about 80 years ago and she was there during the holocaust. She escaped from the Ghetto in Radoshkovichi and joined the Russian and Jewish Partisans from the area in the forests near Plashntzitz. Today she is the head of the memorial meeting for shtetls in the area; Radoshkovichi, Rakov, Horodok and Krasne. This year's meeting will take place on March 25th at Beit Vitzo in Tel Aviv.(depending on the war) Zila told me that they received money to video tape the meeting professionally and they would like to send it to descendants who would not be able to join them in Israel. She would also like to receive addresses of people who had families in those places who nowvlive in Israel that she could invite them to join.
Zila told me about Aharon Gringoltz from Rakov who heads the Rakov Society in Israel. Aharon Gringoltz; phone # 036042605. Aharon was born in Rakov in 1927. Aharon's mother was from the Botwinik family, Aharon and his father were the only survivors from the family, the rest perished in Rakov. Aharon told me that a few years ago he, with others, (mostly form the Horovitz family who left Rakov for South Africa in the 1930s) collected $12,000 to build a fence around the large Jewish cemetery in Rakov. Yuri Dorn took charge of the project. (Yuri takes Jewish visitors from Minsk to Rakov, less then an hour drive)
Zila also gave me the phone number of Shimon Greenhose (#039226130 ) the head of the Krasne Society in Israel. He was born in Krasne about 72 years ago. Shimon told me that he and his mother Rosa (from the Kopilovitz family of Dockshitz) were the sole survivors from his family.
The Jews in ghetto/camp in Krasne were amongst the very last to be annihilated. Survivors from other ghettos massacres were taken or escaped to the Krasne ghetto/ camp. Some Jews from the Camp, including children, were able to obtain arms. They escaped and joined the Russian partisans.
After the war, Shimon Greenhuse came with his mother to Israel. He was a math teacher. A few years ago he took a group of students from "Camera abscura school of Tel Aviv" to Belarus and they filmed a movie in Krasne.
I received a note from The head of the Volozhin Society;
Moshe Porat poratm@netvision.net.il
...As I wrote you , I spoke with Zila . She invited us (from Volozhin) to be present at the next Radoshkovitsh reunion.
I'll be there with Lea Shif (Nahshon) and with Fruma nee Shulman Lifshitz Gafnovitz
Fruma paid for the memorial site in the Horodok Cemetery http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/lifshitz/30304_2_b.gif.
The Volozhin Region Book that I received from the district chairman contained a list of Rakov martyrs in Belarus language. I will rewrite it into latin characters. When ready I'll send it to you.
Kol tuv - Moshe Moshe Porat (a descendant of Rabbi Chaim of Volozhin) has almost single handily translated the Volozhin Yizkor book (written in Hebrew and Yiddish) and other books about the area that were written in Russian and he also posted many pictures (old and recent) from the area.
Moshe also wrote me in his note;
Next autumn two hundred years will pass from the day that Rabbi Hayim
Volozhiner founded the Volozhin Yeshivah "Eyts Hayim - Tree of Life".
It Should be a day to unite and devote our thoughts, prayers and
memories to Volozhin, its Yeshiva "Tree of Life" and its congregation that
was annihilated sixty years ago.
Could the representatives of prominent Jewish congregations in the States
organize such a celebration this year in Volozhin?
To understand the importance of the Volozhin Yeshiva for the Jewish people read
"The Yeshiva in its first days"
Extracts translated from Volozhin Yizkor Book at www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin/vol077.html
Kol tuv - Moshe.
.
- Tuesday, March 25, 2003 at 15:41:13 (PST)
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Dear Mrs. Eilat Levitan,

I found your site on the Internet. You really do a great and outstanding work. Thanks to the information I found on your site I managed to contact a number of its visitors it is for sure that it will help these people to learn more information about small Belarusian towns where their roots are from. I am ready to offer my services for the realization of plans and wishes of people who are united by mutual interests presented on your site. First of all let me introduce myself. My name is Yuri Dorn. I’m the President of the Union of Religious Jewish Congregations of Belarus. This organization comprises more than 13 000 Jews from 19 Belarusian towns. About 12 years ago I started to research Jewish heritage which has preserved until today on the territory of Belarus. I have visited more than 70 towns and ‘stetls’ where Jews lived earlier. I have gathered the collection of pictures. I also managed to gather a number of memories of local citizens about Jewish life before the Holocaust. During my visits I noted every time that actually Jewish cemeteries, synagogues and places related to the Holocaust came to desolation. It is difficult to realize that Jewish Heritage of Belarus is fading away. However, lately people who are interested in the search of their roots and forefathers’ memory preservation have begun to visit our country in increasing frequency. Our organization does what one can to help these people in their work during their being in Belarus. We have a wide experience in the field of mutual work on the Jewish cemeteries and Holocaust places restoration.
In connection with this I would like to apply with your help to everybody who is interested in work in Belarus with the proposal of cooperation.
We hope that with mutual efforts we will be able to restore and to preserve our forefathers’ memory!
Sincerely,
(Mr) Yuri Dorn iro@open.by President of URJC of Belarus

.
- Monday, March 24, 2003 at 09:57:04 (PST)
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The Monin family had a soda place in Krasne.
Monin, George Age: 41 Year:1930 Birthplace:Russia (Odessa )Roll: T626_160 Race:White Page: 3B State:California ED: 634 County: Los Angeles Image: 0213 Township: Los Angeles Relationship: Head came to the country in 1907
Monin, Vera Age:37 Year:1930 Birthplace: Moglive Russia Roll: T626_160 Race: Page: 3B State: California ED: 634 County:Los Angeles Image: 0213 Township: Los Angeles Relationship: Wife came to the country in 1910
Monin, Selma i Age:13 Year: 1930 Birthplace: Illinios Roll: T626_160 Race: Page:B State:California ED: 634 County:Los Angeles Image:
0213 Township: Los Angeles Relationship: Daughter
Monin, Evelyn Age:5 Year:1930 Birthplace: Illinios Roll: T626_160
Race: Page: 3B State: California ED: 634 County:Los Angeles Image: 0213 Township: Los Angeles Relationship: Daughter Monin, Henry Age: 31 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
T625_324 Race: White Page: 18A State: Illinois ED:
881 County: Cook Image: 1088 Township: Chicago

Monin, Mayer Age: 61 Year:1920 Birthplace: Russia Roll:
t625_1135 Race: White Page: 1B State: New York ED:
226 County: Bronx Image: 674
Township: Bronx Monin, Frank Age: 39 Year: 1920 Birthplace: New York Roll: T625_1099 Race: White Page: 19A State: New York ED: 1 County: Erie Image:
39

Monin, Henry Age: 52 Year: 1920 Birthplace: New York Roll:
t625_1101 Race: White Page: 16A State: New York ED:
56 County: Erie Image: 101 Township: Buffalo City

Monin, Henry Age: 54 Year: 1920 Birthplace: New York Roll:
t625_1101 Race: White Page: 16A State: New York ED:
56 County: Erie Image: 101 Township: Buffalo City
Monin, John Age: 28 Year: 1920 Birthplace: New York Roll:
t625_1109 Race: White Page: 7A State: New York ED:
266 County: Erie Image: 583 Township: Cheektowaga Monin, Albert Age: 33 Year: 1920 Birthplace: New York Roll: t625_1109 Race: White Page: 10B State: New York ED: 312 County: Erie Image: 836 Township: Lancaster Monin, Charles Age: 44 Year:1920 Birthplace: New York Roll:
t625_1109 Race: White Page: 14A State: New York ED:
312 County: Erie Image: 843 Township: Lancaster

Munin, Louis Age: 26 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Illinois Roll:
T625_316 Race: White Page: 12 B State: Illinois ED:
440 County: Cook Image: 291 Township: Chicago

Munin, Jane Age: 42 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Pennsylvania Roll: T625_398 Race: White Page: 2A State: Illinois ED:
79 County: Ogle Image: 26 Township: Buffalo

Munin, Mike G Age: 36 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Iowa Roll:
T625_495 Race: White Page: 4B State: Iowa ED: 63
County: Jackson Image: 60 Township: Brandon

ANDRES MUNIN SSN 267-60-5379 Residence: 33135 Miami, Miami-dade, FL Born 28 Sep 1907 Last Benefit: Died 23 Dec 1996 Issued: FL (1957)
BENJAMIN MUNIN SSN 201-09-9217 Residence: 08401 Atlantic City, Atlantic, NJ
Born 15 Sep 1872 Last Benefit: Died Oct 1968 Issued:
PA (Before 1951)
IDA MUNIN SSN 167-52-3195 Residence: 33139 Miami, Miami-dade, FL Born 14 Oct 1908 Last Benefit: Died Apr 1987 Issued:
PA (1973 And 1974)
IDA MUNIN SSN 337-38-8245 Residence: Born 12 Aug 1900 Last Benefit: Died 28 Sep 1994 Issued: IL (1962) J MUNIN SSN 146-60-4323 Residence: 07047 North Bergen, Hudson, NJ Born 15 Mar 1959 Last Benefit: Died Sep 1992 Issued: NJ (1975)
JEAN MUNIN SSN 162-30-5011 Residence: 19131 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Born 17 Jan 1908 Last Benefit: Died 24 Feb 1996 Issued: PA (1953 And 1955)
JENNIE MUNIN SSN 346-26-2470 Residence: Born 13 Dec 1914 Last Benefit: 60453 Oak Lawn, Cook, IL Died Feb 1979 Issued: IL (Before 1951)
JOSE MUNIN SSN 128-52-0077 Residence: Born 26 Apr 1926 Last Benefit: 07047 North Bergen, Hudson, NJ Died Nov 1984 Issued:
NY (1972)
JOSEPH MUNIN SSN 130-20-1232 Residence: Born 9 Oct 1905 Last Benefit: Died 20 Jul 1990 Issued: NY (Before 1951)
MARTIN I MUNIN SSN 205-20-4933 Residence: VA
Born 18 Aug 1929 Last Benefit: Died 9 Oct 1988 Issued:
PA (Before 1951)
Monin, Marcel Age: 21 Year: 1930 Birthplace: France Roll:
T626_2181 Race: White Page: 8A State: Rhode Island ED:
304 County: Providence Image: 0496
Township: Woonsocket "I once met Reb Aryeh trudging at his usual pace through the streets of my neighborhood, the Shaarey Hessed section of Jerusalem, during the ten days of penitence (between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur). 'Where are you going?' I asked him. 'Oh,' he replied, 'I am heading for the home of Dr. Miriam Munin.' Anxiously I asked him, 'Who is sick in the family?' His answer was: 'Thank G-d, we are all well. But the holy day of Yom Kippur is approaching, and since Dr. Munin is an outstanding physician who has treated people with kindness all her life, I am going to her to receive a blessing for the new year that has started for us.' "
Nellie Munin
Jerusalem Should the High Court Intervene in the Economic Considerations of the Israeli Government within the Framework of the Implementation of Israel's
Yedidya Munin sleeps in the empty synagogue
Norma Munin
Karen and Richard Munin Temple Sholom Jubilee Campaign Thanks You
JEAN-LOUIS BREUX: Drawings by Richard Monin, through Jan. 11. Hours by appointment. 9151 Cardwell; 932-1505
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krasne/kne_pix/111301_5_b.gif




Click for the Monin soda place picture in Krane 1930s
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 20:58:23 (PST)
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http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_stories_eternal.html
From; Eternal Testament: Memoirs of a Partisan
by Yakov Segalchick ......A few days later we visited the village Parodnik near Kriviczi. This was the first visit of partisans in the area. Until then, all partisans had avoided the area because Kriviczi, which was only 1 km away, had a big force of Germans and their helpers. After they killed all the Jews in the shtetl, they used the village as a road to get to the train station at Kanihanin. Despite the danger we decided we must take care of the killers, the brothers Mamek Skorot (or Mamek and Skorot?). Avraham Friedman, Bianish Kuzenitz. Zanka Muhammad, and Dinka Treykovski went with me. We came to the first house of the village, "Auf machen!" (?) I yelled. Immediately the door opened and they turned on the light. We ordered them to close the drapes. First we demanded that he return the gold teeth of Hana Katzowitz, which we knew he took out of her body with pliers. They tried to deny it, but we kept beating them. We only beat the two men; the women and children we left alone. The killers opened graves, amongst them Hana’s, the widow of Ishaiau Katzowitz and also the sister-in-law of Rabbi Malkiel Paretzi (the last rabbi of Kriviczi) who was annihilated with the rest of the community in 1942. The brothers opened the graves of her and her children. We received this information from Herzl Rodoshkovicz and Aron Shulman from Kriviczi who were also partisans with the brigade of Kirov.
Now we had to find the killers of the Jews of Dolhinov: Mikhail Proclowicz and the evil brothers Tarahovitz; men who showed no mercy, not even to children. We first had to do some investigating about how we could go to Dolhinov and when and where we could find the killers. Varovka, a villager who hated those killers, found out that Proclowicz had returned to his ranch in Dolhinov. Originally he was too scared to stay there, but after a year had passed and no one had come to repay his evil deeds, he assumed that even the Jewish partisans had forgotten him. Since neither his house nor his family members suffered any consequences, he returned to his home after a year of wandering.
One clear and cold night in December of 1943, Gershon Yafeh and Biyanish Kuzinitz and Dimka Traikovsky went with me on a sled. As we knocked on his window he opened his door dressed in a fur coat and boots. Immediately we ordered him to go inside with his hands up. We turned on lights, and when he recognized us he started shaking. He begged us not to shoot him, but he saw that his death was coming. I asked him how many Jews had he killed and where were all the possessions that he had stolen from his victims. I ordered him to return everything, saying, "If you will return all that we want, we won’t kill you. We’ll just beat you up."
He called his wife and told her to return all the possessions from the hideout, which he’d buried in a deep hole in the ground, which was covered with snow. We sent one of our men with her to check on it, and we found a large amount of robbed possessions about a hundred meters from the house. I became furious. I yelled, "Confess and tell us how many Jews you killed! How many mothers asked for mercy for their babies?" I started cursing at him violently and uncontrollably. I was crazed. "You must take responsibility and die the death due to an evil and wretched person." I shot him in his head and he dropped dead. Now it came to the most important mission, the hunt for the biggest murderers, the brothers Tarhovitz. I had a personal vendetta against them. The blood of my mother was on their hands. They took part in her killing and this is how it happened: the day after we raided Dolhinov in 1942, my mother with the two daughters of Katzowitz, Gashka and Nyakha, escaped from the Ghetto and walked in the direction Pogost to the forest where we had our base. The two brothers, together with the head of the police, found out and chased them on bicycles and were able to find them. They returned them to town while beating them and torturing them along the way. After hours of this torture, they were taken near the Jewish cemetery and were shot. That was not the only murder that they committed with their own hands. They killed many before and after this incident. I saw with my own eyes how they chased the family of Shimshel, the family of Shalom Dukshitzi, and Nehama Leviczi’s with her children and other relatives. They were tortured and beaten and I will never forget it. But how could we reach them? They lived at the very edge of Dolhinov and to reach them you had to go through the entire town, next to an old stone fortress that was garrisoned by German troops. Like an angry dragon it spit out fire at all who came near it, and we did our best to avoid it.
Finally I found an opportunity. In the middle of February of 1944 I was called to headquarters. Yoskov, an officer at headquarters asked me to get food and other supplies to the headquarters since they were waiting for very important people to arrive and they had nothing to feed them. It was a difficult time at that point to achieve such things, but after thinking for a minute I said to Yoskov, "There’s only one complicated way I can think of for achieving this mission. Since there is no food in such amounts near our base, we cannot do it in one night, but we what we can do is go to Dolhinov and we can surely find food there. But I must have a group of fourteen to sixteen fighters. I can take four from my hospital unit, so I’ll need ten to twelve fighters from headquarters. With such a force we can overwhelm them and bring back a large amount of supplies." The idea pleased him so he gave me permission. He assigned 12 well-armed men headed by Major Tzonkov to go along with me and four from my unit, and left for Dolhinov at six that evening with four sleds harnessed to fast horses. Around 10 in the evening we arrived in the outskirts of Dolhinov. After a short visit with Varovka to gather infomation about the town, we left. At 11 at night we arrived near the large home of the Taharovitz brothers. We put two snipers facing the center of the town to cover us, and immediately we went to work. We ordered them to open up the door, turn on the lights, and to pull down the drapes. Then we made them open up the cowshed and horse stables, which were tightly shut with heavy iron bars. I ordered six of the troops with me to take all the livestock out of the cowshed and stable and to herd them in the direction of the forest. Four men took on the sled all the possessions in the house. It took us half an hour to complete the job, which included four cows and six first-class horses. In the sled we gathered bread, lard, flour, salt, kidneys, beans, and also pillows, blankets, sheets, which had all been robbed from Jewish homes. Before we left, I ordered the Taharovicz brothers to go outside. They were dressed only in their underwear and barefoot, and just as they ordered their victims during the slaughter to run, I made them run in the freezing winter night.
After we left, about half a kilometer from town, a steady stream of fire from the fortress came upon us. They shot at us with automatic weapons, but it was harmless fire. It couldn’t reach us since they had no idea where we were headed. They only heard from the wives of the killers that we were most likely heading to Pogost. So without much thinking, I ordered everyone to go on a side road. Immediately we shot the two killers dead. We sat in our sleds and after shooting in the direction of the enemy, we ran away to headquarters. So like this I revenged the blood of my mother and many other Jews who were killed by those evil and cruel men......
....So like this we stood, a few Jews, lonely and mourning, but also full of anger at our people’s killers and the collaborators who would inform on the Jews and incite the killings. We remember and we will remember until our dying moment, every Dolhinov and local area youth that helped to fight the enemy and fell in the battle. Amongst them, Mulke Koritzky, Haya Shulkin, Hyena Shulman, Zalman Friedman, Mordechai Gitlitz, Mordechai and Mina Hadash, Shimon Gordon, Matityua Shimhovitz from Horodok, Shimon Kiednov from Kriviczi, Shimon Meirson, Gershon Meirson ,Mashka Dimmenstein, Avraham Itzhak Shuster, Yisrael Ruderman, Zelig Kuznitz, Mitzia Friedman from Postov, Hanoch Friedman, Faber Levin from Radishkovicz, Yisraelski from Radishkovicz, Itzhak Einbender from Kurenets, Binyamin Shulman from Kurenets, Shpreyergan from Plashensitz, Faber Rodnik from Radishkovicz, David Glasser from Dokshitz, Menashe Kopilovicz.Noach Dinerstein of Vileyka and others Honor and glory to their memory. May their souls be melded in the bouquet of living (?). We must remember them in every memorial, and our revenge also will be the revenge of their blood. The revenge quieted for a moment the open anger that boiled in my blood, but late at night, all alone, my soul was restless. I knew nothing of my wife and my little girl was not yet with me. I wanted to leave the town, but I didn’t know when or where I would go. I still had a duty there, and I felt that my wife was alive and that she would one day find me. But only after half a year, at the beginning of March of 1945 was I able to leave town. Meanwhile I continued my work with the NKVD in the town. Slowly there were ten families that returned to town. Some were in Siberia, others in the center of Soviet Asia. Some of the families never returned. Others returned and lived in other areas in the area, but I’m sure others will tell their stories. As they came, everyone had a strong desire to leave the area to go to Poland, which was a gateway to other destinations. There was an agreement with Poland and the Soviet Union that anyone who was a former Polish citizen would be allowed to now leave the Soviet Union to go to Poland, so everyone went there, but no one thought of staying in Poland. It was just a station on the way to other places. I... to read the entire story click here
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 18:14:36 (PST)
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In a message dated 3/7/03 5:46:18 AM Pacific Standard Time, beryl writes:
Do you have an e-mail address for Shimon Greenhose (who was born in Krasne) in Israel?
only for his son;
ng@ofeknw.com

My maternal ggf was Shale GREENGOUS from Minsk, and I'm trying to find out
more about the family
I posted pictures of GREENGOUS (I am not sure how to spell it)
click Greenhouse Family or paste http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/greenhouse.html
Pictures of;
1. Yakov Greenhuse from Vileyka. last name of the family changed in Israel to Hadri. was killed in 1948 during the war in Israel.
2. Nachum Greenhuse perished in Vileyka
3. Arye Greenhuse perished in Vileyka
4. Fira, Daughter of Dov Greenhuse from Vileyka with her husband Shimon Kramnik and their daughter Slava. The entire family perished in Vileyka
from Ellis Island i found many Radiskowitz I created a site for the shtetl. it is near Minsk http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/radoshkovichi/radoshkovichi.html
1.Gringaus,Abraham Radoshkewitz, Russia 1907 35
2. Greenhouse,Echewied Radoszkowics, Russia 1921 17y
3. Grimhous,Jelskein Rodeskewiz, Russia 1909 18y
4. Grimhous,Jona Rodeskewiz, Russia 1909 14y
5. Grimhous,Lea Rodeskewiz, Russia 1909 42y
6. Grinhaus,Dweire Radiskewitz 1905 11y
7. Grinhaus,Haskel Radiskowitz, Russia 1907 17y
8. Grinhaus,Lipe Radischkowitz 1903 18y
9. Grinhaus,Mante Radoszkowic, Russia 1907 18y
10 Grinhaus,Noemi Radoschkovitz 1903 11m
11 Grinhaus,Riwke Radosckkowitz, Russia 1910 17y
12 Grinhaus,Sprinze Radoschkovitz 1903 19y
13 Grun,Chaie Sore Radoszkowicz 1904 40y
14 Grunfest,Dina Radyozkowicz, Russia 1921 61y
15 Grunhaus,Chaim Radischkowitz, Russia 1913 17y
16 Grunhaus,Jankiel Radoszkowice, Poland 1922 25y
17 Grunhaus,Schebsel Radiszkowitz 1904 18y
18. Grinhaus,Beile Raduschkowitz 1900 3
19. Grinhaus,Chene Raduschkowitz 1900 8
20. Grinhaus,Dabe Raduschkowitz 1900 18
21. Grinhaus,Ester Raduschkowitz 1900 43
22. Grinhaus,Jons Raduschkowitz 1900 16
23. Grinhaus,Michle RAdiskuwitz, Russia 1912 17
24. Grinhaus,Rochel Raduschkowitz 1900 10
Grinkaus,Moische Krasno 1903 18 Krasne is very near Radiskowitz Shimon Greenhose was born there
for the entire list;
Name Residence Arrived Age
24 Grinhaus,Abraham 1892 5
25 Grinhaus,Abram 1906 45
26 Grinhaus,Beile Raduschkowitz 1900 3
27 Grinhaus,Boruch Minsk, Minsk 1907 46
28 Grinhaus,Breine Minsk, Minsk 1907 20
29 Grinhaus,Chaie 1892 13
30 Grinhaus,Chaiwe Krementzug, Poltawa 1907 20
31 Grinhaus,Chaje Minsk, Minsk 1907 18
32 Grinhaus,Chane Niwenetz, Russia 1912 7
33 Grinhaus,Chane Semkowa, Minsk 1908 16
34 Grinhaus,Chene Raduschkowitz 1900 8 Radiskowitz
35 Grinhaus,Dabe Raduschkowitz 1900 18 Radiskowitz
36 Grinhaus,David Wilno 1906 16
37 Grinhaus,Dweire Radiskewitz 1905 11 Radiskowitz
38 Grinhaus,Elic Bialystock 1892 18
39 Grinhaus,Ester Raduschkowitz 1900 43 Radiskowitz
40 Grinhaus,Freide Minsk, Russia 1914 42
41 Grinhaus,Gische 1893 10
42 Grinhaus,Golde Niwenetz, Russia 1912 34
43 Grinhaus,Haskel Radiskowitz, Russia 1907 17 Radiskowitz
44 Grinhaus,Hiroch 1904 31
45 Grinhaus,Hirsch Kowm 1905 21
46 Grinhaus,Itze Minsk 1904 21
47 Grinhaus,Itzik Rubsenitz 1898 24 Radiskowitz
48 Grinhaus,Jacob 1892 4
49 Grinhaus,Jakel Wilno 1906 11
50 Grinhaus,Jojne Niwenetz, Russia 1912 9
51 Grinhaus,Jons Raduschkowitz 1900 16 Radiskowitz
52 Grinhaus,Lea Minsk 1905 17
53 Grinhaus,Leib Wilua 1906 48
54 Grinhaus,Leib Kleck, Russia 1911 23
55 Grinhaus,Libe 1892 7
56 Grinhaus,Lipe Radischkowitz 1903 18 Radiskowitz
57 Grinhaus,Mante Radoszkowic, Russia 1907 18 Radiskowitz
58 Grinhaus,Masie 1893 40
59 Grinhaus,Maske Bialystok 1904 20
60 Grinhaus,Mendel Semkowa, Minsk 1908 42
61 Grinhaus,Michle RAdiskuwitz, Russia 1912 17 Radiskowitz
62 Grinhaus,Moische Bialostock, Russia 1913 18
63 Grinhaus,Moische Hinsk, Russia 1914 8
64 Grinhaus,Moische Aron Minsk, Russia 1911 20
65 Grinhaus,Mordche Minsk 1900 17
66 Grinhaus,Necham Semkowa, Minsk 1908 36
67 Grinhaus,Nechaue 1892 36
68 Grinhaus,Noemi Radoschkovitz 1903 0 Radiskowitz
69 Grinhaus,Peisach Vilna 1906 20
70 Grinhaus,Peisalh Bialikow , , 1906 40
71 Grinhaus,Reisel 1894 28
72 Grinhaus,Rioke 1893 17
73 Grinhaus,Risoke Denerke 1903 19
74 Grinhaus,Riwke Radosckkowitz, Russia 1910 17 Radiskowitz
75 Grinhaus,Rochel Mensk, Russia 1909 18
76 Grinhaus,Rochel Raduschkowitz 1900 10 Radiskowitz
77 Grinhaus,Ruchel Minsk, Russia 1914 9
78 Grinhaus,Ruwen Wilna 1905 27
79 Grinhaus,Schliom Wilna, Russia 1907 14
80 Grinhaus,Schmul 1892 6
81 Grinhaus,Scholem Minsk, Minsk 1907 11
82 Grinhaus,Solomon Jaffa, Turkey 1910 30
83 Grinhaus,Sore Minsk, Minsk 1907 48
84 Grinhaus,Sprinze Radoschkovitz 1903 19 Radiskowitz
85 Grinhaus,Wolf Fle, Russia 1911 22
86 Grinkas,Alexander Preiby Russia 1913 26
87 Grinkus,Anton Ponures 1899 28
88 Grinkus,Apolonia Joneskare, Russia 1907 23
89 Grinkus,Sigmund Wiendi, Russia 1909 25
90 Grinkus,Tadeus Kowno 1897 28
91 Crinkaus,Bartoloma Reifnigg 1906 45
92 Crinkaus,Emma 1896 26
93 Grincius,Petias Pluszi, Russia 1913 19
94 Grankaus,Freide Minsk 1906 42
95 Grinchaus,Hirsch Nadosowtz 1899 26 Radiskowitz?
96 Grinchaus,Nochom Raclisch 1902 21
97 Gringhaus,Armand Paris, France 1916 19
98 Gringhaus,Assia Paris, France 1916 14
99 Gringhaus,Fanny Paris, France 1916 16
100 Gringhaus,Hana Paris, France 1916 43
101 Gringhaus,Jacques Paris, France 1916 13
102 Gringhaus,Simon Paris, France 1916 57
103 Grinkhaus,Israel Uspol, Russia 1913 23
104 Gryngauz,Golda Minsk, Poland 1920 18
105 Gryngauz,Jacob Minsk, Poland 1920 20
106 Gryngauz,Ryrka Minsk, Poland 1920 12
107 Gringauz,Aron Bs. Aires, Argentine 1923 19
108 Grintaus,Fischel Minsk, Russia 1907 29
109 Gringaus,Abraham Radoshkewitz, Russia 1907 35 Radiskowitz
110 Gringaus,Chain Minsk 1907 10
111 Gringaus,Dina Minsk, Russia 1904 19
112 Gringaus,Elke Minsk 1907 4
113 Gringaus,Feige Minsk 1907 34
114 Gringaus,Isser 1905 17
115 Gringaus,Leibe Minsk 1907 6
116 Gringaus,Vigdor Niusk, Russia 1913 21
118 Grinkaus,Schmuito Minsk, Russia 1914 48
1 Grinous,David Minsk 1904 25
2 Grineus,...zent Kowno 1893 33
1 Gringus,Schiam Argentina 1924 24
18 Grinkaus,Moische Krasno 1903 18 near Radiskowitz
Gringos,Fouttel Bistyotoll 1905 20
Grinnus,Kasimer Bertosn, Russia 1910 20
Grinos,Stanislaw V... 1900 16
Grungaics,Chaim Wilki 1906 0
330 Grungaics,Friede Wilki 1906 27
331 Grunsgaics,Israel Wilki 1906 25
1 Greenhauser,Joh. 1906 25
2 Greenhause,Lazarus England, Birmingham 1907 49
3 Greenhause,Louis Bermen 1905 16
4 Greenhouse,Mrs. Martin E. 1904 38
5 Greenhouse,Mrs. S. 1910 26
1 Grimhaus,Aron Riga, Russia 1911 9
2 Grimhaus,Chaie Riga, Russia 1911 31
3 Grimhaus,Chaim Rowno, Russia 1914 26
4 Grimhaus,Chaim Bialystok, Russia 1917 13
5 Grimhaus,Chaje Minsk, Russia 1910 41
6 Grimhaus,Chana Bialystok, Russia 1917 46
7 Grimhaus,Esche Minsk 1901 35
8 Grimhaus,Esfira Riga, Russia 1911 4
9 Grimhaus,Faube Riga, Russia 1911 2
10 Grimhaus,Hewe Minsk 1901 22
11 Grimhaus,Itzig Schadowe 1904 31
12 Grimhaus,Josef Tirna 1904 43
13 Grimhaus,Jude Wilna 1904 45
14 Grimhaus,Leib Minsk 1901 55
15 Grimhaus,Leib Bialystok, Russia 1917 48
16 Grimhaus,Nechame Riga, Russia 1911 0
17 Grimhaus,Rieor Riga, Russia 1911 10
18 Grimhaus,Riwke Bialystok, Russia 1917 9
19 Grimhaus,Salman Riga, Russia 1911 6
20 Grimhaus,Schimen Minsk, Russia 1910 36
21 Grimhaus,Schmul Bialystok, Russia 1917 16
22 Grimhaus,Taube Minsk 1904 20
23 Gringhas,Athanasios Rapsany, Greece 1914 31


Click for the Greenhuse family
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 13:11:41 (PST)
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The Russian Imperial government prepared census reports for each Uyezd
(district) within the Gubernia (province). The reports called Revision
Lists for our district were stored prior to 1842 in the Minsk Archives and
between 1842 and 1917 in the Vilna (Vilnius) Archives.
Harold Rhode advised that other than the 1850 list and its amendments, none
of the other post 1842 Revision Lists for our district survived WW2.
We initially had a contact who could make copies of the documents and a
proposed cost of $2600 was discussed. I contacted our members and suggested
raising this money to acquire and later translate the entire 1850 Revision
List.
Before this could get off the ground, someone contacted the chief archivist
and raised a stink and we were informed that no further copying would be
allowed. Dave Fox then started asking the Family History Center in Salt Lake City to
change their policy concerning the types of records they film and to take
on this job. Three months ago we were finally given a negative response.
Just this week, I was informed that a reliable person had been found who
could translate the revision list and take down a manual translation. The
costs mentioned were very reasonable. I was then asked in what priority would we ask this person to do the
research. What towns or cities should be done first? With over 150 cities,
towns and shtetls, this question sounded very difficult to answer.
After some thought a logical answer came to mind. Very few of you have
actually contributed any money and the fund now contains only about
$700.00. I feel that it is only right that those persons who contributed
the most money should be granted the most benefit.
Accordingly we are breaking down the list of contributors by the
cities/towns/shtetls that each is interested in. The final list will not be
prepared until all of the arrangements have been made, so if you want your
location to be given priority, you should contribute or increase your
contribution to the fund. All contributions are tax deductible for instructions see:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Belarus.html If you have read the Belarus SIG web page, you know that a section has been
reserved for our district. If you look at the tremendous work done by the
members of the Lida & Minsk districts, you know that we are falling way
behind in making our research available to the members of the SIG.
Several of our members have their own private web pages for their town or
their family. If you are willing to share your web page with the SIG, Ed Rosenbaum can
set up a link to your web page from the Vilieka Uyezd section of the SIG's
page. Those interested should contact me.
If you have done research of your town and have a report with or without
photos, but don't have a web site, please let me know.
If any of you have the knowledge to set up web pages and can contribute
time to help those of us who don't have that knowledge, please advise.
In other words lets get this group moving.
Best regards, Steve
Coordinator: Vilieka Uyezd (district) of Belarus

PS: I am researching the following families:
Germany: BAUM in Bosen; EISENKRAMER, MARX & LEFEVRE, LEFEBVRE, LEFEBRE in
Rhineland Palatine//Belarus: BASIST,
BASHIST in Lida Dist; COHEN formerly SHEINHOUS, SHINHAUS
SHEINHOUSE,SHEINHAUS,SCHEINHAUS,SHEINHUEZ,
SCHEINGAUZ,SHEINHAUZ in Radoshkovichi, Molodechno in the
Vilieka Dist//Galicia: BIRNBAUM,GOLDBERG, LEINKRAM in Krakow;
GELLER in Mielec; SCHNEPS,SHNEPS,SZNEPS in Dembitz, Tarnow; KREINDLER; ECKSTEIN
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 13:07:17 (PST)
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The speech of the Israeli born
Dr Gideon Radushkovitz at the mass grave at Dolhinov Jewish Cemetery
on the 1st of September 2002.

Without asking for your permission, I have taken it upon myself to say a few words in the name of the younger generation –the generation that did not go through the Holocaust or experience any of its horrors, but lived, breathed and were raised in the shadow of its memories from the day we were born.
We didn't have to come here to learn what had happened. We have read the books, seen the pictures, and more important, we have heard the stories at home from eye witnesses about the horrors that were perpetrated here to our families.
We have come here to our own personal valley of death, to Dolhinov, so that you could show us for the first time, and maybe the last, those same places that we grew up hearing about throughout our childhood and from which we imbibed the true value of Zionism that we have all acquired, that same value that motivated and drove us to achieve excellence in various units in the army whether as ordinary soldiers, fighters or as commanders.
Despite the fact that we are all past the age of army service, this journey is meant to add fuel to the flame that burns within each one of us in order to preserve it and pass on the torch to the next generation, so that they will be able to understand the meaning of our lives especially in Eretz Jisrael, with all the difficulties we face.
I want to thank my uncle Shlomke Shamgar for the hair-raising stories he told while we stood at the mass graves, of the direct and indirect responsibility of the local population as to what happened here. I fully identify with him.
In a few days time we will take off in a white plane with blue stripes painted on its body and the star of David on its tail, flown by an Israeli pilot, and, when its wheels are withdrawn from this cursed land, whose rivers are flowing with the blood of our dear ones, we will feel, at least some of us, a certain satisfaction at leaving behind us the murderers and their offspring, steeped in their own miserable lives. And we will return to the only place on earth which is our real home.
I cannot conclude these words without thanking Leon Rubin and whoever helped him for voluntarily taking upon himself the organization of this difficult and complicated project, the climax of which was our visit to Dolhinov. Thanks go to him for his willingness to help, his skilled organization and manner, and especially for his amiable, likeable personality which made this trip exceed all expectations.
Thank you.
Gideon Radushkovitz (Translated from Hebrew)
Cl8ick for picture of Dolhinov in 1942
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 13:03:53 (PST)
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March 19, 2003 Shalom Eilat, War is coming tomorrow!
How did they debate "WAR" in Volozhin 89 years ago?
Please read : The strategy specialists' are debating the results of the oncoming war.
Volozhin during the First World War
By Reuven Rogovin
Translated from VYB p. 343, by M. Porat
It's a pleasure to read Reuven's stories. His memory was phenomenal. His humor was the quintessential Yiddish humor of the Litvak Shtetl's. One could sense in every sentence his great love for his neighbors. Reuven was born in Volozhin in 1905. He recognized the danger that the Jews would be facing under German invasion and was one of the very few Volozhiners who escaped to Russia before the Nazis entered the Shtetl. He survived the war, together with his wife and children in Russia. Part of the time he served as an officer in the Red Army. He left the USSR and made aliya through Poland in 1958. He contributed a great deal to the Volozhin Yizkor Book describing the Shtetl's every day life.
Reuven, God bless his soul, passed away in Israel in 1972.
The strategy specialists' are debating the results of the oncoming war.
Page 343
When the Austro Hungarian crown prince was killed in Sarajevo, a group of Volozhin Balebatim sat inside the Klayzl-Syngogue discussing the future events. Among them were Fayve der Shnayder (tailor), Oyzer der Raznostshik (mailman), Meyer Peshe Yentes, Naftoli der Eynbinder (book binder). They came to the conclusion that the war would not reach our shtetl and therefore the Volozhin inhabitants should be relaxed.
“ Russia is mighty and huge. She is entitled to behave as per the Tsar's desire. Russia might lead the war against the Germans in Siberia, against the Avstraks (Austrians) in Caucasus and if so would be her desire she could fight against all her enemies in the large steppes of the Ukraine or in the deserts of Mandjuria. All depends on decisions that would be made by the High Command of the Tsar's army”
Such was the conclusion of Oyzer der Raznostshik, Volozhin’s most competent "Strategist". Nahumke Telzer, the Yeshiva man, who during the debate was reading a book, lifted his head abruptly and said: “Rabeyssay (my masters), Please let me tell you a true story.”
The audience became attentive and Reb Nahumke initiate his tale:
“A Jew, a very poor tenant farmer had six very ugly and loathsome daughters. Due to their homeliness it was impossible to find bridegrooms for them. One day a shadkhn (Matchmaker) arrived in the lessee's home with exiting news. “I have an “excellent party” for your eldest (Who was the ugliest) daughter, but I cannot reveal the bridegroom's name fearing very much your anger.”
The Jew swore on his Peysses and beard that nothing evil would happen to the shadkhn after the name was told. The shadkhn became courageous and exposed the secret: “The suggested bridegroom is none other but the sole son of count Tishkevith, the Volozhin region's very rich land and forests owner.” The lessee became very angry hearing to whom his daughter was indicated to be a bride. “It could never be”. He said, “I would never let my daughter convert to Christianity.” The shadkhn left the lessee's house empty handed. But the proposed “Shiduch” began to settle in the lessee's head. His wife too was insisting, “maybe its worth accepting the proposition. We would become rich; it's not a joke to have a count as our daughter's father-in-law. It would greatly improve and probably totally alter our financial status.” The lessee called the shadkhn and told him:
“After experiencing difficult internal conflicts I decided to give my daughter as a wife to the son of the count.”
“Beautiful”, answered the shadkhn, “now we have to get to the next step, your agreement alone is not enough, now we should obtain the count's and his son's agreement.” “And the moral of this story is”, continued Reb Nokhemke, “You claim that as per her desire Russia would be able to lead the fights in Ukraine, in Mandjuria or wherever she would choose, but did you already obtain Germany's and Austria's approval? Are you sure that they would agree to lead the battles in those places, precisely?”
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 13:00:53 (PST)
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...I returned to Horodok, where mass-slaughter survivors from Volozhin and Molodetshno just arrived. The Germans established a small concentration work camp in Krasne, a crossroad junction midway between Molodetshno and Radoshkovitsh, where able Jews from Volozhin, Mir, Lida, Novogrudok, Horodok and other places were brought to maintain the railroad. My husband was among them. When we separated I told him
"Our fate, mine and the girls is already determined, but you will survive because you are regarded by the German as an efficient Jew" -
So was our naïve opinion that working for the Germans will keep us alive.
Every week some of the workers were allowed to go and bring food from Horodok into the Krasne camp.
My little six year old daughter caught a bad scurvy gums illness. Mr Ratskin the Judenrat head pitied me and arranged for Yakov a special permission to come for a visit in the Horodok ghetto.
The bitter end of the Horodok ghetto arrived at the Shabbat that Yakov spent with us, on July 11th 1942.
The Jews of Horodok and the vicinity did not sense the oncoming danger. Their last sleep had been a sleep of the just.
Tha next morning at an early day break hour the Gestapo and its local assistants intruded the Ghetto to take out the Jews.
five persons lodged at our home.
There were three hiding places. The hideout in which I concealed myself with my little girls was discovered by the local police after the action had already passed.
Mr. Ratskin, who was an elderly man, could not sustain the strangling atmosphere in the small hidding place. We assumed that the action had already passed and he was obliged to go outside. His going out had provoked our hiding disclosure. They shot at Yakov and killed him on the spot.
Afterward the murderers gathered all the Jews they found into the square to be selected. Those they found able to work were transferred to the Krasne camp. The old ones, invalids and children were sent to death. Among the sentenced to die was also Fruma, Tsivya Tsart's mother. She had been beat bestially, until she was covered with blood. The Germans enclosed all of them inside a barn, shot them and burned it.
translator's note: (as Fruma told me this evening)
In this barn, 900 Horodok Jews found their tragic fate, along with Fruma Lifshits's mother and her five grand kids, among them Shoshanele and Hayele Lifshits. Yakov had been shot by one of their Horodok gentile neighbors. Fruma witnessed her husband's death and had seen the bestial murderers throw away his body.
was expelled to Krasne. Heyne my older sister was enclosed in the Krasne Concentration camp, and my younger sister was placed with me in the Krasne Ghetto. There I met people from Volozhin, among them Yosef Tabakhovitsh and his wife Elke nee Shaker. Tsviya Tsart dwelled beside me and my sister on the same planks. It was impossible to safeguard any hygienic conditions, and a typhus epidemic broke out. As a result, the three of us were hospitalized in a house outside the Ghetto. and we were "privileged" to be inspected by the Gestapo physician. He used to oversee the patients and determined by his cane movement which person to carry out to the "bath house" i.e. for execution.
After my bout with typhus I was very feeble, so Father would endanger himself by infiltrating from the camp into the ghetto to bring some grains to fortify my body.
We were brought into the "bath house". The Germans examined our withered bodies, but in some way our fate was not yet decided. Thanks to my poor health status I was released from work for a few days. I used this time to seek food for my hungry friends in the Krasne Ghetto.
Once I went to search for food with my brother in law and with Ester Rogovin from Horodok. We went into a neighboring hamlet to gather some bread. On the way back we came upon guards from the German Police. When they passed near us we distinguished red bands on the Germans’ forearms, they were actually Russian partisans who had fought a German unit the day before. They had won the battle, took the German uniforms and wore them. We talked to them and they agreed to take Jews who would carry arms and escape from the Krasne camp.
We returned to the Krasne camp and told everyone the exciting news. We found ways to secretly buy rifles. One day a group of us was able to cross the rails and join the partisans. They accepted us thanks to efforts made by Eliezer Rogovin from Volozhin who was already with them.. A new unit was founded by the name of "Staritski" within the Tshkalov brigade. We met some Volozhiners in the forest, among them Feygele Perski, Hirshl Rogovin, Ishayahu Lieberman and Pashe Perski wife of Simha Perski. I was transferred into a partisans’ arms repair workshop after a little time, where I worked until liberation on July 1944.
From time to time bitter fights occurred between German forces and partisan units. The hardest German attacks broke out in July 1943. During this period many partisan garrisons existed in the forests of Belarus. In order to fight them, the Germans organized the Vlassov army, named after the famous Russian traitor General Vlassov. Those units were composed of Belarus, Kazakhs, Lithuanians, Ukrainians and other anti-Semites, all of them Hooligan-murderers. Their first mission was the destruction of hamlets and farms near the forests. The fate of the peasants in those hamlets was not much better than that of the Jews. Many Christians ran to the forest. The Germans opened an offensive on the forest, by heavy shooting, shelling and setting fires. We were obliged to disperse. Kopl Kagan, Peshka Potashnik, her brothers Yehuda and Yosef, my brother-in-law Berman, and I found a hideout from which we got out just in time to meet the liberating Red Army.
Together with Peshka Potashnik we went through Krasne and Horodok into Volozhin. I decided to leave the shtetl where each stone was impregnated with blood of our dearest. The Soviet authorities proposed to me that I teach in a Belarussian school. I refused as I was not ready to teach youngsters who willingly assisted the Nazis in murdering Jews. I crossed the border to Bialostock in Poland. But here in the Land of the Jews’ extermination camps, where the A.K.(Armiya Krayova), blood thirsty anti-Semites awaited us, I could not stay. I continued my wandering....

Click here to read the entire story
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:57:42 (PST)
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Subj: Kurenets and Radoshkovichi (near Krasne)
Date: 2/22/03 2:01:27 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: EilatGordn
To: loumau@mindspring.com
You could find much information about the families; Zimmerman Family and Shulman Family if you really read all the pages on the sites.
It will take me many emails to put it all for you but I am putting a sample here from;
Ellis island data, natives of kurenets ;
52 Schulman,Rachmiel Korinitz, Russia 1907 43y
53 Schulman,Reitze Kurnetz, Russia 1910 20y
54 Schulman,Rubin Kuronitz, Russia 1913 16y
19 Zimerman,Freide Kurinetz, Russia 1912 19y
20 Zimmerman,Gersch Kurmitz, Russia 1911 21y
21 Zimmerman,Himke Kuranjets 1906 4y
22 Zimmerman,Libe Kuranjets 1906 28y 1
23 Zimmerman,Rochel Keranitz, Russia 1913 18y
24 Zimmermann,Peissach Kurenietz, Russia 1913 42y
1929 Business Directory for Kurenets xSzulman Aron son of Zvi.-Tanning (My great grandfather born c1880- perished 9-9-1942 in Kurenets) xSzulman M.-Grocery store xSzulman Natan- 'x Szulman R Textile


Cymerman E. -Grocery store Cymerman F- Tea house Cymerman - bakery in Kurenets stories you could find three Zimmermans who are natives of Kurenets who wrote stories (There are others who's mothers were Zimermans who also wrote) ; Three Years Story by Yitzhak, son of Nethka Zimerman
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_3years.html


"June 24, 1941. It was the third day of the German-Russian war. The Soviet authorities had begun retreating from our area, and to us it appeared that the Red Army troops were in total pandemonium. We too, the Jews of Kurenitz, were panicking. We watched the Red Army turning to the east. "Where would we go?" we asked desperately, running for advice from one neighbor to the next. Each one of us knew of the impending disaster. But still some Jews consoled themselves and others by saying, "It is impossible that the renowned Red Army would be defeated so easily". They said, "This must be part of their tactics to win the war. You will see, tomorrow or the next day theyÕll get reinforcements and the whole situation will change." Other Jews would console each other announcing "the Germans only hate the wealthy Jews. Since there weren't any rich Jews amongst us in Kurenitz after the period of Soviet rule, which had made everyone of us equally poor". So, they reasoned, "we had no reason to worry". Kurenitz buzzed with these kinds of conversations as the German army entered the town. The same day, on Tuesday afternoon, we saw the troops of the Red Army rapidly fleeing from the advancing German army. Wounded Russian soldiers, lost and confused ran around, trying to find shelter. German planes flew very low, almost touching the roofs of the houses. The Germans planted seeds of death in the midst of the running troops. They also killed peaceful shepherds and their herds. All of our reasoning and calculations ceased with the sounds of the slaughter. The Jews searched frantically for a place to hide themselves. Many went east with the retreating army, but only a few managed to cross the border. Most of them were stuck in the little shtetls east of Kurenitz, such as Dockshitz and Dolhinov. The ones who stayed in town prayed for pity from heaven. We started gathering a few families together like lost, lonely sheep. We felt the danger was all around us, so we clung to each other. We believed that if we all huddled together!
we would be safer. I remember a Saturday morning a week after the war had started. It was a beautiful, clear June day, beaming with natural splendor. All the cedar trees at the end of Mydell Street were covered in bright green aura, as if they were mocking our dark fears. Then the first Germans arrived in Kurenitz. They were known as the 'Spearheads' and it was their mission to scout out the area before the actual army was brought in. (In reality, there had been Germans in Kurenitz on the fourth day of the war, but they were paratroopers disguised as members of the Red Army.) The scouts came from the fields near the Savina Forest. They crossed Mydell Street and continued toward Poken. A few of them saw my father and asked him mockingly, "Nou, harasha tasiviatsa?" (Do you live comfortably?). My family and I lived on Dolhinov Street, near the center of Kurenitz. When we learned of the Germans' arrival, we left our apartment and moved to Sweshtchefola at the end of Mydell Street. We had always thought of Sweshtchefola as the end of the earth, the area was on the outskirts of the village and was largely Christian, but now we felt more hidden there, and safer. I remember that Saturday well indeed. Our family gathered in Uncle Yesha's yard that afternoon. The yard was big, and open to the surrounding roads and the fields, including the road to Balashi. Suddenly, as we stood there, discussing what to do, I saw an armed car coming from the direction of Myadell Street. At first we were hopeful, and thought it was a Soviet car, but as the car approached, we saw the white and yellow flag and the black swastika of the German army. "The Philistines," I said, and everyone froze. 'This is the end,' we thought, but a miracle occurred. The soldiers said 'hello' respectfully and greeted us politely. The unexpected attitude of the German troops improved our spirits and bolstered our hopes for the future. Uncle Yesha was very excited and a passage from Tehilim (Psalm) came to his mouth. "The ones that sow with tears, harve!
st with happiness, " he recited. The family began discussing the situation. Uncle Yesha was convinced that we were still safe and that the future would be bright. He believed that we would be awarded despite the fear that was haunting us. Our imagination, he claimed, allowed us to get carried away.


to read the rest; http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_3years.html Last year I talked with the daughter of Yitzhak Zimmerman in Israel. you could read my notes in the Guest book for kurenets.

Shimon Zimmerman is the head of the Kurenets society in Israel- He lives in Kfar Harif, a place that he established and was settled by Jews who came from the area of Vileyka. There are shulmans who live there also. Shimon Zimmerman story; http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_zimmerman.html




I was 17, a student in the technicum for economic studies in Grodno, on the shores of the Nemun River. I did well in my studies and received a scholarship in Stalin's name. I was the head of the school's student bodyand was very involved with the communist party. Full of plans and dreams for the future, I was absolutely sure that the communist rule that two years prior had replaced the radical anti-Semitic Polish rule was heaven on earth for us, Jews. This idyllic fantasy didn't last long. On June 21, 1941, I finished my finals with high marks. In good spirits, my friends and I went to see the choir of Yordnah. The next morning, I was planning to go back to Kurenitz to spend my summer break in my hometown. What happiness I was anticipating, seeing my parents, girlfriend Riva, my good friends, and having a good time every minute of my summer vacation.Instead of leisurely getting up and going to the train station, exactly at 4am I was awakened by sirens from the dorm alert system, then the sounds of aircraft, German messerschmitts, and explosions everywhere. At that moment I had no idea of the tragedy that befell me, and I never imagined that my days of youth were over. That teenage celebration of life, schoolwork and having casual fun with friends would be replaced by a daily struggle to survive. I was sure that everything would be like the songs we sang-Stalin would give the orders, and our pilots would clean the skies of the messerschmitts. Marshal Voroshilov, the head of Russian army, would take the Red Army to swift triumph and knock down the German infantry like a samurai from Japan, and I would come home only a few days late. But as high as the expectations so were the depths of the disappointments. Already in that first day I knew it was not like the songs we sang. Grodno shared a border with Germany at that point in time, and now was heavily air attacked, the bombing growing in intensity. The Soviet planes that just managed to take off, as Skidal airfield was destroyed, were chased and hit by the !
German messerschmitts, and fell out of the sky like paper toys. The Germans had absolute control of the skies. The bridge that connected the city that was parted by the Nemun River was the only way to go east, but it had a huge traffic mess, and nothing could move because of the innumerable out of order vehicles. In the afternoon, we got an order to gather in small groups and leave Grodno. Carrying our packages on our backs, without instructions as to where to go, no food, and no information about what was going on, we chose partners. Our group included 8 guys and 2 girls. We took off from the largest synagogue in Grodno; prior to the war it was used by our school for lectures. We started walking toward Skidal-Lida. The whole town was girdled with traffic, broken army vehicles, and torn telephone wires; the communist authorities left the city hastily in great panic while German aircraft were continuously attacking and pushing inlandÉEncountering hardship and danger, we finally managed to leave Grodno. We were tired, hungry, and lost. The roads were filled with civilians and soldiers who ran in a frenzy. The German planes flew very low, almost touching the ground, shooting at everyone below with machine guns. We reached a forest and decided to rest. At dawn we saw horrible images. The road was filled with wounded and dead and no one took care of them. The Russian soldiers didn't know where their officers were. They took off their uniforms, got rid of their weapons and ran for their lives.Hundreds of prisoners of all nationalities - that were mostly imprisoned for being late for work - were supposed to go that day to Skidal to build an airfield. Instead they left the prison camp half-naked and mixed in with the crowds going east.Because of all this pandemonium, the second day, I was left only with one friend of the entire group; the rest were lost. On the third day, four prisoners from the Skidal camp joined us; we were on the road to Dolhinov, 30m km from Kurenitz. We ate fruit and vegetables we found in !
the fields, and drank from every dirty puddle. The heat was unbearable and the flies wouldn't leave us alone. On top of it all, I had new shoes and my feet were all swollen and when I took my shoes off the skin came with it.Hungry, in a daze, and bare-foot we continued east. The train did not work and every kind of public transportation was destroyed. There was no private transportation because gas was not available. We reached Lida and took a longer route; circling the burning town, we continued to the direction of Ilya. We came close to the road that would take us to Minsk, the capital of Belarus. We were sure the Red Army would stop the invaders from coming there, but that didn't happen. The Germans' strategy was to put units in the back of the Red Army; they put small units everywhere and that helped them to create demoralization and panic in the Russian army and local authority. Later on, we found out that the general of the Minsk front was a German collaborator and helped the Germans capture the city. Everything around us was destroyed and an enormous marching German army, extremely organized and prepared with every equipment and supply you could imagine, continued going ahead like it was a never-ending army parade. I understood that all was lost. I dug a hole in the ground and made a mental note of where it was and put my party membership and professional cards in the hole, hoping to retrieve them one day. In no time we were in the hands of German soldiers who took us to the German headquarters. A young German soldier with a baby face asked me where I was going, I explained I was a student and was going home, I showed him my student ID (I didn't even remember that it said I was a Jew). He left and came back with a higher authority officer and explained to him that I was a student and pointed to my long hair, then they both left. Later the baby-faced soldier came back and gave me a sandwich with jelly and egg. He gave me my ID card back and let me go. My friend and the other guys with buzz cuts wer!
e taken blindfolded. The Germans suspected that they were soldiers in the Red Army. So in the heat of the afternoon of June 24 1941, I stood shocked and confused after my first meeting with the Germans. I was 20-km from Radeshkovitz. The town where the poet Mordechai Tzvi Maneh, who I admired so, was born.Before I was let go by the Germans, I was sure this was my end; just thinking about it brought tears to my eyes. I was an only son and could imagine what my parents were going through. My girlfriend, Riva and my parents would have never known where I was buriedÉ The sound of what turned out to be two German planes chasing a huge Soviet plane brought me back to reality. I saw them hit the plane and tons of papers and maps dropped from the sky. The Russian pilot parachuted not far from me. I just lay there frozen with fear. A few minutes later pastoral quietness took over. I first stood, and then ran, not knowing where to go. Not far from there, I saw a little farmhouse. I knocked. The farmer was scared to let me in, but he gave me a piece of bread and cucumber and showed me the way to Ilya, a town where my uncle lived. When I arrived in Ilya, I learned the Germans had not entered yet. At the Soviet headquarters of war, I saw many armed soldiers. A policeman hung warnings on the street that two people had been executed for stealing something from a factory. At my uncle's home, there were a few Jews, merchants and businessmen during the time of the Polish control, and they were happy about the defeat of the Red Army! I was shocked and couldn't understand. Despite their knowledge of Hitler's views of the Jews, Jewish people were sitting so content, not even considering what was to come. The poor people truly believed nothing would happen to them, that they would manage!....
read the rest at What I Remember By Eli Zimmerman (a Kurenitz native) As told to Morton Horwitz in New Haven What I Remember ;http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_remember.html Most of the original members of Sheveth Achim [Synagogue in New Haven] came from the Kurenitz area of Russia. Kurenitz in pre-revolutionary times was in Vilna Gubernia (state) so the were Litvaks as well as Lubavitcher Chasidim. In fact, when I was a little boy of six or seven in Kurenitz of the 1880s, I remember that the Lubavitcher Rebbe himself came to our synagogue for a Shabbos. What a crowd greeted him! But no one was impressed with the way he chanted the haftorah. Although we all were Lubavitcher Chassidim, we did not wear black kaftans or suits or hats the way the Lubavitcher do in Crown Heights, just regular clothes. Of my family, my father came to this country first and brought me over in 1906 when I was sixteen. The rest came over a few years later. Everyone wanted to come to American because there was absolutely nothing to keep anyone inside Russia in those days. Most people couldn't make a living and the Czarist government didn't let Jews budge from here to there if they wanted to improve themselves. THE KURENITZ CONNECTION The Statue of Liberty celebration in 1986 was a special celebration for me too. It was just eighty years since I first saw the Statue when I passed it on my way to Ellis Island on the ship which brought me to America from Russia. I could see it only from a distance then, but it meant so much to me that I made up my mind that I would pay it a visit as soon as possible. So it was only a couple of weeks after the train had brought me to New Haven that I took the excursion train back to New York. Relatives in New York showed me the way by subway and then the ferry. There I was, staring up at the Statue of Liberty. I climbed it all the way to the top. I would like to try to climb it again some day soon. The Statue meant, and still means, freedom for me; freedom from Russia, freedom from the Czar, freedom from poverty, and freedom from the old life of Kurenitz. If, in Fiddler on the Roof, you could erase the name Anitevkah and substitute Kurenitz, you would have a good picture !
of my home town when I left it in 1906. For a long time already the struggling Jews in our Kurenitz had been keeping their eyes on America. Life was hard and bitter in that part of Czarist Russia in those days as I suppose it always was. To us it was Russia although actually we were Litvaks from Vilna Gubernia living among Lithuanians, Poles, Russians and, of course, Jews. Not just Jews, but Lubavitcher Chassidic Jews! We were rich in religion, rich in Chassidism, rich in synagogues, rich in children, rich in Yiddishkeit, but oh, were we poor! But then almost everyone was poor. And it looked like things never would get better. Things weren't so bad in Kurenitz, come to think of it. We had a bedroom, a living room, and of course, a kitchen. The only trouble was that all of this was in only ONE room! At least the bathroom was outside. But there was nothing about which to complain. We did have a floor. And the rent was cheap. Our family had a well-rounded diet, too. Mostly it was potatoes made this way, that way, or another way. To back up the potatoes there was p'chah and herring and fried onions plus cholent and chicken and soup for Shabbos. Bread, however, was cheap and plentiful, good and fresh. The bagels were real bagels made of special white wheat, not like the goyishe bagels of America made with holes in them. Those who lived in the "suburbs" had it a little better than we did food-wise. Because they had more room, they were able to raise chickens in the back yard with even a goat or two running around. We envied Zavel Estra's family and others like it who lived in the suburbs (shtetlach) and who had chickens and goats. But they didn't have a real floor! There were little fishing towns like Zaneritz in the Kurenitz area. There was plenty of fish to eat in Zaneritz but not much else. And there was trouble even in selling fish. Ask the Horwitz or the Zanrotsky families. The residents of Anitevkah, I mean Kurenitz, constantly talked about "dos goldeneh lahnd - America" even in their sleep. Way back in !
the 1880s, some pioneers like the Krivitzkys, the Cohens, the Aldermans, and the Hoffmans had made the first move towards the New World. I can't figure out why or when these Kurenitzers first decided to settle in a city called New Haven. Maybe it was the "New" part of the name which made it sound almost like the famed New York. How they got to New Haven from the boats, I don't know; but soon these first settlers started bringing over their relatives and landsleit from that area. That was how New Haven came to be settled by the Kurentiz pilgrime. Kurenitz in 1903 had a lot of synagogues and Hebrew Schools, but when any students showed some promise they were sent out to yeshivahs in Shmagun (pronounced Smagun by Litvaks). The yeshivahs there were not exactly Ivy League like the yeshivah in Lublin, but they were a step up in the way of traditional learning. So at the age of 13 off I went to Shmagun by horse and cart. I didn't..... for the rest go to ttp://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_remember.html
You wrote.....
Dear Mr. Fox,
Ive enjoyed the Belarus site very much, and hope to meet you at the Annual
Meeting in Washington. However, of more immediate concern, I would like to ask you about Eilat Gordin Levitan. He seems to have constructed the sites
for Radoshkovichi and Kurenets, the places of origin of my husband's
grandmother and grandfather. He shows pictures of Shulman and Zimmerman
family members, but doesnt really give us any useful genealogical material on them. Is he still alive? Is Gordon Levitan a relative? How can I contact him? I would appreciate any general guidance.
Katherine Harris
Sorry that you found sites with hundreds of pictures from the shtetls and many stories and lists "without any useful genealogical material for you"- and You are asking if I am still alive!

My picture with my children around me (I am the blond woman! not "HE" with the hat) http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/gurevitz/g8_big.jpg I am related to both families; Shulman; my grandmother was Bela nee shulman, daughter of Aharon, son of Zvi shulman and Zimerman; My great great grandmother was Sara nee Zimerman, she was married to Zalman Uri Gurevitz (born c 1840 died in Kurenets c 1922)
As I wrote there is much information but you must give me your family information if you want me to help!!!! I have asked all of you to help with the site and many of you did. The site will be "useful" for your families if you let me post your pictures, stories, family trees and information.
Eilat Gordin Levitan click for the story
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:44:30 (PST)
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1858 Vilnius Revision;

Surname Given Name Father Relationship Age in 1858;
GERSHTEYN Itsko Nisel Head of Household 38
GERSHTEYN Chava Movsha Wife 20

Ukmerge1874
GERSHTEYN Moritz Julian Head of Household 28 Registered in Vilnius, resides in Ukmerge
GERSHTEYN Osip Moritz Son 2 Registered in Vilnius, resides in Ukmerge
GERSHTEYN Gregor Moritz Son 1 Registered in Vilnius, resides in Ukmerge
Merkine
Trakai
Vilnius 1858
GERSHTEYN Movsha Ziskind Head of Household
GERSHTEYN Gita Aron Wife 60
GERSHTEYN Izarel Movsha Son 34

GERSHTEYN Eydla Movsha Daughter married in 1855
GERSHTEYN Dobka Movsha Daughter 18
---------------------------
GERSHTEYN Efroim Movsha Head of Household
GERSHTEYN Izrael Efroim Son 23
GERSHTEYN Tsirka Itsko Wife 41
GERSHTEYN Chayka Efroim Daughter 22
GERSHTEYN Rochla Efroim Daughter 12
GERSHTEYN Rivka Movsha Daughter-in-Law 24 Izrael's wife
-----------------------
GERSHTEYN Leyba Zelman Head of Household
GERSHTEYN Eyga Shimel Wife 58
GERSHTEYN Shimel Leyba Son 20
GERSHTEYN Leah Girsha Daughter-in-Law 22 Shimel's wife
GERSHTEYN Iosel Leyba Son 17
GERSHTEYN Ayzyk Leyba Son 35
GERSHTEYN Vita Movsha Daughter-in-Law 33 Ayzyk's wife
GERSHTEYN Chaya Ayzyk Grandchild 10
GERSHTAYN Movsha Elyash David 1877 Kupiskis Ukmerge Kaunas
GIERSZTEJN Mowsza Aron 1885 Marijampole Vital Records

Name Residence Arrived Age
Gerstein,Wolf Wilna, Russia 1902 10
Gerstein,Limsche Wilna, Russia 1902 8
Gerstein,Abram Wilna 1901 8
Gerstein,Amalie Wilna 1901 18
Gerstein,Anna Wilna 1901 20
Gerstein,Gitel wilna 1901 43
Gerstein,Gittel Wilna 1899 14
Gerstein,Hirsch Wilna 1899 19
Gerstein,Meier Wilna 1899 51
Gerstein,Schelens Wilna 1899 11 Gerstein,Philip Nowograd, Russia 1909 30
6 Gerstein,Abraham Nowsgrad, Russia 1913 23
Gerstein,Aurach Mowograd, Russia 1908 2
Gerstein,Mitte Mowograd, Russia 1908 21
Gerstein,Berl Vowogrod, Russia 1908 9
Gerstein,Berl Nowogroda, Russia 1909 9
Gerstein,Ester Nowograd, Russia 1909 21
Gerstein,Bruche Mowograd, Russia 1908 26
Gerstein,Faset Mowograd, Russia 1908 31
Gerstein,Leiser Nowogrod Wolyn 1904 45
Gerstein,Leiser Nowogrod Wolyn 1904 45
Gerstein,Sovia Nowograd, Russia 1909 0
Gershtein,Dawid Nowogrod, Wolyn, Russia 1907 41
9 Gerstein,Abram Mikotajar, Poland 1921 14
Gerstein,Moische Masir, Russia 1908 32
10 Gerstein,Abram Mosyr, Russia 1912 0
12 Gerstein,Abram Mosyr, Russia 1913 25
Gerstein,Benjamin Mosy, Rusia 1910 12
Gerstein,Berl Masir 1902 24
Gerstein,Brocha Mosyr, Russia 1911 20
Gerstein,Chasja Mosyr, Russia 1912 55
Gerstein,Ettia Mosy, Rusia 1910 36
Gerstein,Golde Mosyr, Russia 1911 19
Gerstein,Benjamin Mosy, Rusia 1910 12 37
Gerstein,Masche Mosyr, Russia 1910 18
Gerstein,Gisa Masir 1902 20
Gerstein,Mera Mosyr, Russia 1912 24
46 Gerstein,Boruch Mosyr 1904 24
Gerstein,Nechume Mozir, Russia 1913 17
Gerstein,Golde Mosyr, Russia 1911 19
Gerstein,Rachel Mosyr, Russia 1912 25
Gerstein,Chaike Antopole 1904 5
Gerstein,Braine Antopole 1904 18
Gerstein,Rachel Antopol 1904 31
Gerstein,Freide Antopol 1904 17
Gerstein,Ettel Antopole 1904 30
Gerstein,Joel Antopol 1905 17
280 Rudel Gerstein,Riwke Antopol 1900 22
Chaim Gerstein,Israel Antipoli 1897 31
Gerstein,Moses Antopol 1904 18
Gerstein,Noel Antopol 1904 4
Gerstein,Mosile Ansopole 1901 26
13 Gerstein,Abram Tastaw, Russia 1913 10
Gerstein,Leja Odessa, Russia 1913 25
Gerstein,Abram Odessa, Russia 1908 28
Gerstein,Chane Odessa, Russia 1908 0
Gerstein,Annie Odessa 1906 32
Gerstein,Boris Odessa, Russia 1908 5
Gerstein,Chane Odessa, Russia 1908 2
Gerstein,Gittel Odessa 1906 7
Gerstein,Dweire Odessa 1906 5
Gerstein,Ester Odessa 1906 28
Gerstein,Josef Odessa 1906 11
Gerstein,Jennie Odessa, Russia 1908 26
Gerstein,Elke Odessa 1906 7
Gerstein,Manie Odessa 1906 5
Gerstein,Nate Odessa 1906 9
Gerstein,Nechame Odessa, Russia 1909 22
Gerstein,Peree Odessa, Russia 1913 0
Gerstein,Masei Odessa 1906 22
Gerstein,Ferge Mariampol, Russia 1907 55
Gerstein,Feige Mariampol, Russia 1907 35
Gerstein,Mozes Mariampol, Russia 1911 34
Gerstein,Meier Miropol, Russia 1912 26
Gerstein,... Gerschad 1899 22 Gerstein,...olde Stanislaw 1906 24
Gerstein,Abe Dwinsk 1898 17
Gerstein,Abisek Kopehernitze, Poland 1921 11
Gerstein,Abraham ...astow, Russia 1909 20
7 Gerstein,Abraham Fastow, Russia 1909 20
Gerstein,Israel Fastau, Russia 1911 45
3 Gerstein,Abram Tastaw, Russia 1913 10
Gerstein,Judel Tastaw, Russia 1913 40
Gerstein,Jankol Lublin 1902 6
Gerstein,Liebe Lublin 1902 7
Gerstein,Benjamin Lublin 1899 34
Gerstein,Chane Lublin 1902 15
Gerstein,Dwaice Lublin 1902 35
Gerstein,Moritz Lublin 1900 32
Gerstein,Ritke Lublin 1902 10
Gerstein,Rive Minsk 1901 21
Gerstein,Reisa Minsk, Russia
Gerstein,Chaja Minsk, Russia 1913 2
erstein,Doba Minsk, Russia 1913 30
Gerstein,Froim Minsk, Russia 1913 9
Gerstein,Liebe Minsk 1905 23
Gerstein,Masche Minsk 1905 3
Gerstein,Newach Minsk, Russia 1913 7
Gerstein,Freick Minsk 1901 19
Gerstein,David Kischinero 1906 4
Gerstein,Ester Kischinero 1906 25
Gerstein,Lisa Kischinero 1906 7
Gerstein,Marcus Kischinero 1906 35
Gerstein,Leo Kischinero 1906 0
Gerstein,Anna Kischinero 1906 9
Gerstein,Bertha Kischinero 1906 3
8 Gerstein,Abraham Ludrinowo 1892 10
15 Fischel Gerstein,Abram Keseljindze, Russia 1911 41
16 Gerstein,Aini Stanislaw 1906 3
Gerstein Basche Pinsk 1904 19
17 Gerstein,Aiorum Piatki, Russia 1913 49
18 Gerstein,Alic Chanien, Russia 1912 18
19 Gerstein,Alte 1893 34
20 Gerstein,Alter Grodno 1905 21
22 Gerstein,Aniela Scwarzbach Germany 1913 3 23
26 Gerstein,Arrum Gralinsk 1905 3
28 Gerstein,Basche Hadiszink,Russia 1913 19
30 Gerstein,Basi Gralinsk 1905 30
31 Gerstein,Basie Barkoure, Russia 1907 19
32 Gerstein,Beila Baranowka 1910 30
33 Gerstein,Beile 1900 11
34 Gerstein,Benjamin 1893 9
38 Gerstein,Berl 1896 35 43 Gerstein,Bertko Baranowka, Russia 1912 22
45 Gerstein,Borris Berlin 1905 29
48 Gerstein,Breine 1893 7
49 51 Gerstein,Bruche 1895 22
Gerstein,Cfroic Liverpool 1904 8
55 Gerstein,Chaike Kamenebrod, Russia 1907 9
56 Gerstein,Chaim Brzezin, Poland 1921 14 57 Gerstein,Chaim Golinetz, Russia 1914 20
58 Gerstein,Chain 1893 11
60 Gerstein,Chaje 1893 35
61 Gerstein,Chaje Koretz 1907 11
62 Gerstein,Chanc Bialybor, Gaicia 1910 9
Gerstein,Chave Russia 1906 2
68 Gerstein,Chawe Brzoza 1905 9
Gerstein,Chuma Rogacew, Russia 1921 16
70 Gerstein,D...eire bremen 1893 25
Gerstein,David 1893 4
Gerstein,David Labischin 1904 20
Gerstein,David Ostrowo 1906 22
75 Gerstein,David Kowno 1902 44
Gerstein,David 1893 18
Gerstein,David Breslitoff, Russia 1912 19
Gerstein,David Brest, Russia 1912 19
Gerstein,Dawid Rostow, Russia 1913 18
Gerstein,Dawid Russia 1910 28
Gerstein,Dina Pinsk 1905 4
Gerstein,Riwe Grodin, Russia 1907 16
Gerstein,Dora F...sterburg 1904 21
Gerstein,Dwore Davidow 1904 29
Gerstein,Eawriel Barauow 1900 17
Gerstein,Eester Rogacew, Russia 1921 15
Gerstein,Efosim Hurys 1900 10
Gerstein,Efraim 1897 7
Gerstein,Ella W. Hartlepool 1893 21
Gerstein,Emanuel New York, NY 1920 18
Gerstein,Esriel Brzezin, Poland 1921 16
Gerstein,Ester Iskorosly, Russia 1913 15
Gerstein,Ester Brestlit, Russia 1912 18
Gerstein,Ester Chanien, Russia 1912 20
Gerstein,Ester Biolzstok, Russia 1907 32
50 Gerstein,Brocha 1911 20
Gerstein,Estera Brzezin, Poland 1921 35
Gerstein,Esther Narodicz, Russia 1910 3
Gerstein,Etel Vodja, Poland 1921 19
Gerstein,Evelyn Roxbury, Mass. 1924 22
Brandel Gerstein,Fajga Kopehernitze, Poland 1921 8
Gerstein,Flate Kornitza, Russia 1912 22
Gerstein,Fankel 1900 3
Gerstein,Feige 1894 0
Gerstein,Feige 1894 21 Gerstein,Franz Scwarzbach Germany 1913 25
Gerstein,Freidel 1913
Gerstein,Freike 1893 4
Gerstein,Frida Budapest, Hungary 1923 46
Gerstein,Riwe Hangs 1900 60
Gerstein,Frida Zipotarky 1905 16
Gerstein,Fridel Cson, Russia 1913 18
Gerstein,Frojem Warsaw 1901 28
Gerstein,Frume Seletz 1906 3
Gerstein,Ftzig 1900 0
Gerstein,Gdal Koretz 1907 48
Gerstein,Geib Taskow, Russia 1910 17
Gerstein,Gitte 1893 20
Gerstein,Gittel 1895 14
137 Gerstein,Golde Sulenetz, Russia 1914 18
Gers 1921 46
Gerstein,Hanna Vodja, Poland 1921 21
Gerstein,Hene Konotop, Russia 1910 19
Fradel Gerstein,Hene Iskorosly, Russia 1913 33
Gerstein,Henni Biolzstok, Russia 1907 3
Gerstein,Herchek Kopehernitze, Poland 1921 16
Gerstein,Hersch Brzoza 1905 11
Gerstein,Hersch Wlodawa, Russia 1907 37
Gerstein,Hersch Ludrinowo 1892 6
Gerstein,Hinde Lytzk, Russia 1908 3
Gerstein,Hirch Hurys 1900 11
Gerstein,Hirsch Louiza 1906 18
Gerstein,Hyman Glasgow 1904 20
Gerstein,Ides Rowno 1904 14
Gerstein,Ilke Seletz 1906 35
Gerstein,Isaac Slawilka 1906 21
Gerstein,Isaac 1911 48
Gerstein,Israel Wisoka 1899 38
Gerstein,Israel Ostrow, Russia 1912 23
Gerstein,Israel Hangs 1900 60
Gerstein,Israel Antwerp, 1906 0
162 Gerstein,Israil Dwinsk, Russia 1912 8
Gerstein,Riwka Pinsk 1905 3 Gerstein,Issac USA 1911 47
Gerstein,Itzig 1893 17
Gerstein,Izachne Brzezin, Poland 1921 11
Gerstein,Izrael Brzezin, Poland 1921 9
Gerstein,Jachmece 1893 28 Gerstein,Jahnen 1895 16 Gerstein,Jankel 1895 9 Gerstein,Jankel Rowna, Wolin 1905 38
Gerstein,Jeschike Woseln, Russia 1913 23
Gerstein,Jochel Hurys 1900 40 Gerstein,Joel Ozewen Gub Wolen 1904 25
Gerstein,Josef Brody,Galicy 1908 20
Gerstein,J Hrilenczow, Russia 1913 22
Gerstein,Josef Zytoim 1904 37
Gerstein,Josef Mikotajar, Poland 1921 20
Gerstein,Josek Warschau, Russia 1912 38
Gerstein,Joseph Budapest, Hungary 1923 18
Gerstein,Jossel Luminez, Russia 1914 42
Gerstein,Kapel Rotterdam 1902 32
Gerstein,Rachel Antwerp, 1906 5
Gerstein,Kurt Hagen, Germany 1911 28
Gerstein,Lea Wastow 1905 20
Gerstein,Leib 1895 11
Gerstein,Leib Rogacew, Russia 1921 62
Gerstein,Leib Hangs 1900 6
Gerstein,Leibe 1906
Gerstein,Leibisch Warschau, Russia 1913 18
Gerstein,Leie Limitz, Russia 1911 18
Gerstein,Leie Zaslaw, Russia 1907 18
Gerstein,Leie 1911
Gerstein,Leon Stanislaw 1907 25
Gerstein,Leon New York, N.Y. 1924 20
Gerstein,Lieser Cholm, Poland 1920 31
Gerstein,Malke Ludrinowo 1892 30
Gerstein,Maria Mikotajor, Poland 1921 22
Gerstein,Marya Scwarzbach Germany 1913 25
Gerstein,Mates Kalinkowiz, Russia 1910 28
Gerstein,Mathel Tastaw, Russia 1913 8
Gerstein,Max Ludrinowo 1892 8
Gerstein,Mayer Awgzr 1903 20 Gerstein,Meier Polone, Wolin 1905 23
GHersch Gerstein,Meier Ostrowo, Siedl, Russia 1911 34
Gerstein,Mendel Pinsk 1905 2
Gerstein,Mendel 1900 5
Gerstein,Meyer Szeszew, Austria 1907 23
Gerstein,Michael Bronx, NN. Y. 1924 38
Gerstein,Michail Dwinsk, Russia 1912 1
Gerstein,Moische Krasnostop 1904 31
Gerstein,Morduch Grodno, Russia 1907 58
Gerstein,Moritz R. Sarat 1906 13
Gerstein,Moritz Kopszownica, Russia 1912 37
Gerstein,Moses 1897 11
Gerstein,Motel Rotterdam 1903 21 Gerstein,Munil Taskow, Russia 1910 16
Gerstein,Nat 1921 21
Gerstein,Nathan Dobrowicz, Russia 1910 45
Gerstein,Nathan 1921
Gerstein,Nathan Antwerp, Belgium 1920 21 Gerstein,Nathan 1920 21
Gerstein,Nathan 1920 20 Gerstein,Nathan 1920 20
251 Gerstein,Nechame Lahischin 1904 22
Gerstein,Nessie Lytzk, Russia 1908 25
Gerstein,Newach Minsk, Russia 1913 7
Gerstein,Nissan Lahischin 1904 20
Gerstein,Nutte Lytzk, Russia 1908 2
Gerstein,Paul Budapest, Hungary 1923 8
Gerstein,Peisach Dolvwka, Russia 1909 36
Gerstein,Peise Oszamow Wolh, Russia 1909 28
2 Gerstein,Perel Rogacew, Russia 1921 60
Gerstein,Perez 1893 2 Gerstein,Perse Pinsk 1905 30
Gerstein,Pinchor Russia 1912 20
GERSTEIN,REWKE SMOLACZ AUSREIA 1911 17
Gerstein,Reite Hangs 1900 8
Gerstein,Riwke 1900 40
279 Gerstein,Riwke 1911
Gerstein,Riwko 1906 51
Gerstein,Roche Dwinsk, Russia 1912 35
Gerstein,Rochel 1893 16
Gerstein,Rochel Rowno 1904 25
Gerstein,Rochel Fastau, Russia 1911 11
Gerstein,Rodimel Minsk, Russia 1908 20
Gerstein,Rome Lakorosh, Russia 1913 60
Gerstein,Rosa 1893 8
Gerstein,Rose Bronz, New York City 1922 31
Gerstein,Rose
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- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:37:06 (PST)
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PIALKA Avraham husband of Hadasah Gershtein wed 10 Sivan 1897
Hadasah nee GERSHTEIN wife of Avraham Pialka wed 1897
PIALKA Avraham Alia 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
guests at Gershtein-Pialka wedding;
GERSHTEIN A
GERSHTEIN Gershon (Michael's great grandfather)
FIALKA Seine Found in Lithuania Town;Vilnius 1945
BIELICKA Golde born; 1898 Strasuno 11 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
BIELICKI Chaim born;1894 Strasuno 11 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
BIELICKA Ita born; 1931 Strasuno 11 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
PILECKI Meier 1917 Siauliu 6 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
PILECKI Sara 1915 Siauliu 6 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
PILECKI Leiba 1941 Siauliu 6 - 21May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
BIELICKA Beila born;1925 Strasuno 11 - 21 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
BIELIC Sima born; 1932 Ligonines 11 - 1 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
BIELICKA Bejla born;1914 Lydos 13 - 8 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
FIALKO Chaja 1916 Rudninku 13 - 3 May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
FIALKO Eta May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
FIALKO Jacob May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
FIALKO Sulamis May 1942 Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners
guests at Rozowski Silver Wedding party 1895 Vilnius
GERSHTEIN Y (Yona son of Leibe, brother of Gershon?)
GERSHTEIN N (Nachum?-my husbands' grandfather was Nachum Levitan born 1900 was he named for GERSHTEIN N who died by then? your grandmother also had a brother Nachum)
guests at Rozowski-Feigel wedding 1899 Vilnius;
GERSHTEIN Yona
The David Shinuk Stroy Shiniyuk Family Sheinok Bris 1899 Vilnius;
GERSHTEIN Gershon
GERSHTEIN Yona
1915 Vilna City Directory only 4 GERSHTEYNs GERSHTEYN Iona (Yona) son of Leyb Antokolskaya Street, 54
GERSHTEYN G (Must be your Gershon) Antokolskaya Street, 61b 8-91
GERSHTEYN I Antokolskaya Street, 61a 3-91 1(same address as GERSHTEYN G)
GERSHTEYN Movsha (Moishe) Great Stefanovskaya Street, 17
Balbina nee GERSTEIN BERENSTEINIENE Dental Surgeon / Permanent Certificate Degree from Kharkov - 1909 Kesticio 65 born in 1877 lived in Kaunas I must ask my father in law about her his mother was also a physician.
The only GERSHTEYNs in 1858 Vilnius Revision;
Surname Given Name Father Relationship Age in 1858;
GERSHTEYN Itsko Nisel Head of Household 38 ;Yitzhak son of Nisel born 1820
GERSHTEYN Chava Movsha Wife 20
Ukmerge 1874
GERSHTEYN Moritz Julian Head of Household 28 Registered in Vilnius, resides in Ukmerge
GERSHTEYN Osip Moritz Son 2 Registered in Vilnius, resides in Ukmerge
GERSHTEYN Gregor Moritz Son 1 Registered in Vilnius, resides in
in Ukmerge 1858
GERSHTEYN Leyba Zelman Head of Household
GERSHTEYN Eyga Shimel Wife 58 born 1800
GERSHTEYN Shimel Leyba Son 20
GERSHTEYN Leah Girsha Daughter-in-Law 22 Shimel's wife
GERSHTEYN Iosel Leyba Son 17
GERSHTEYN Ayzyk Leyba Son 35
GERSHTEYN Vita Movsha Daughter-in-Law 33 Ayzyk's wife
GERSHTEYN Chaya Ayzyk Grandchild 10


information from;Parsha
How is this Yonah Gerstein related? Is he Gershon's brother
.....Yonah Gerstein "learned Jew," the utshani yevrei, who was close to the Vilna governor, a very learned man from the teacher's seminary of that time
Gerstein, it appears, was not an enemy of the Volozhin yeshiva, as other maskilim of his area at that time. At the critical moment, he helped not only the yeshiva but my father himself. Besides our fears regrading the yeshiva, there was also the danger that the writings and responsa in the chest would be sent as far as Petersburg for an inquiry. And that would mean, in actuality, that they would be lost forever. Gerstein understood all this, and so he sent back all the Torah writings with the observation that they contained no criminal activity. He then burned all the letters referring to fund-raising and money collecting, with the explanation that they were person letters that were not even worth sending back. But he set aside seventeen responsa that my father had written to Rabbi Yaakov Reinovitz in London, to whom the informer had sent his forged letter, for further investigation. These letters never returned and remain lost to this day. The entire episode left no trace behind, besides the government stamp on the chest of Torah: "a memory of the destruction."
Rabbi Meir Berlin (1880-1949)
picture;http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/20801_5_b.gif son of the Netziv (1817-1893).
picture; http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/1230_14_b.gif
information from;Parsha http://216.239.51.100/custom?q=cache:5NiX0ztRpB4C:www.shemayisrael.co.il/parsha/review/archives/bhar-bech59.htm+Yonah+Gerstein&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
August 29, 1901;
Gerstein, Gitel F 43y M Russian Wilna going to husband David Gerstein in New York with children;
Gerstein, Anna F 20y S Russian Wilna
Gerstein, Amalie F 18y S Russian Wilna
Gerstein, Abram male 8 years old Russian Wilna
from Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg
----------------------------------
April 26, 1899 ;
. Gerstein, Meier M 51y M Russian Wilna
. Gerstein, Hirsch M 19y S Russian Wilna going to brother in New York
. Gerstein, Schelens M 11y S Russian Wilna
Gerstein, Gittel f 14 years old S Russian Wilna
Manifest for Bremen
Sailing from Bremen
--------------------------------------
July 06, 1902
. Lieberman, Dina F 25y M Russian Wilna, Russia going to husband Lieberman brother in law Gerstein Wechester? 57 New York
Gerstein, Limsche F 8y S Russian Wilna
. Gerstein, Wolf M 10y S Russian Wilna
. Lieberman, Sinse M 3y S Russian Wilna, Russia
. Lieberman, Rochel F 3y S Russian Wilna
one cousin named Gary (along with his parents Mula and Nina Gerstein) and a small group of distant cousins who live in Israel survived the Holocaust
My husband's family is from the "distant cousins- Israeli survivors." My husband with his parents visited the relatives in Mexico when he (My husband) was in the last year of high school; 1969. He only remembers meeting one person who was in his sixties. (I will ask my father in law for more information)
My father in law remembers Dr. Lova Gerstein from the ghetto in Kovno. He said that he was a very good looking man. Dr. Lova Gerstein was an internist/ cardiologist and he was related to
my father in law's family. his daughter was about the same age as my father in law but his memories of her father are stronger since he was a very impressive and nice man. ------------------------------------------------------------------
There are two books about the city of Vilna written by Hillel Noach Magids =Steinschneider. Book I came out in 1900 in Vilna. It gives history of the city but more important, biographies of the notable Jewish families living there.I found data on my family Walk.The book is in Hebrew. When the English version came out in 1990, it deleted the biographies!!
Mordechai Zalkin has taken the manuscript left by Steinsneider and put out Volume II which came out recently here in Israel. He gives an introduction on Magids and the biographies of other Vilna Jews, mostly Maskilim. In addition, there is a listing of all the people who appeared in Volume I. This book too is only in Hebrew. It would be worthwhile if somebody were to index the names in English for those who wish to research. Meriam Haringman
GERSHTEIN, Leib s. Gershon 1912 I.Chonovch (Leib is Lova)
Photographs of Conscripts to the Russian Army Database 1900-1914
I've copied a section of my grandfather's memoirs regarding Lova Gerstein as follows:
(from Samuel Esterowicz's Memoirs)
My wife's older brother Leon (Lova), a physician, lived permanently in the
city of Kowno, in Lithuania. Because of Poland's occupation of Wilno,
Lithuania's historic capital, Lithuania closed its frontiers and interrupted all
relations with the latter, thus cutting Lova off from the family.
Lova had graduated with a gold medal from the Commercial College of
Wilno in 1909 and, after having served his military service ( as a volunteer
he had to serve one year instead of four ), he enrolled in the Medical school
of the University of Halle, in Germany, where he was caught by the first
World War. As a Russian citizen he was detained by the German
authorities and he spent the four years of the war in relatively bearable
conditions in a German military hospital.
After having received his Medical Diploma in 1919, he started to practice as
a physician in the newly created, independent, democratic republic of
Lithuania, initially in the city of Jurburg, subsequently in Kowno (Kaunas).
Lova got married in the same year as we did, i.e. in 1928, with the very
beatiful Kowno woman, Maria (Marusia) Blumental.
In 1929 Marusia was to give birth to a daughter, who by coincidence was
named Perella, just as was our daughter born in the same year.
A European in his manners and cultural demands in the best meaning of
this term, Lova was also distinguished and very handsome - as a couple he
and the beautiful Marusia were (in the opinion of many) an ornament to any
social gathering in Kowno.
Even though he had left home rather early, Lova maintained his strong
attachment to his family. Notwithstanding the long separation from them,
Lova continued to be the wonderfully loving and considerate son and
brother, always ready to offer any sacrifice when the members of his family
needed his help.
Lova was accorded the merited authority and well deserved love by the
family, my wife was full of adoration for him.
My wife's other brothers - Naum, born in 1895, David, born in 1900 and
Mula in 1901 all lived in Wilno and worked with their father in the lumber
business. Because of the occupation of Wilno by the Germans in 1915, the
only one of the brothers to achieve a high school diploma was Mula, who accomplished it after the war. Naum remained single.

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- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:35:58 (PST)
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Kreincs,Marz Smargan, Russia 1910 28
94 Kreines,Leizer Smorgon, Russia 1913 40
95 Kreinus,Jakob Smargan, Russia 1909 17
Kreines,Golde Smogou 1906 19
Kreines,Merlach S... 1905 20
33 Kreines,Rewke Swargan, Russia 1912 20
Manifest for Batavia
Sailing from Cuxhaven July 14, 1906
Kreines,Golde female 19 year old tailor Russian Hebrew from Smorgon going to Brooklyn to cousin Willy Levin
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp December 16, 1913
Kreines,Leizer male Smorgon, Russia single40 years old going to freind in New York 114 116 west 187 St. Kreines,Merlach Smorgon 1905 20 years old K.Kreines
in Passic? New York t
Kreines,Rewke Smorgon, Russia female 1912 S 20 Russia - Hebrew
going to uncle Kreines Passic? New York140 Howard Str\reet
Zipkin, Chiema F 45y W Russia - Hebrew Smergan, Russia
0017. Zipkin, Guesia F 11y S Russia - Hebrew Smergan, Russia
0018. Zipkin, Itjko M 8y S Russia - Hebrew Smergan, Russia
0019. Zipkin, Motte M 17y S Russia - Hebrew Smergan, Russia

.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:31:43 (PST)
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Levitan, Maris (Moshe Yosef) Â View Image Online
 Age: 45 Year: 1930 (The age is wrong- he was much older)
 Birthplace: Lithuania Roll:
T626_1544 Â Race: White Page:
13A Â State: New York ED: 6
 County: New York Image: 0757
 Township: Manhattan
 Relationship: Head
Rabbi works in; Hebrew School married at age 21 born in Lithuania came to the U.S in 1928.
Levitan, Judith  View Image Online
 Age: 44 Year: 1930 (Also wrong age)
 Birthplace:  Roll: T626_1544
 Race:  Page: 13A  State: New York ED: 6
 County: New York Image: 0757
 Township: Manhattan
 Relationship: Wife
married at age 20, born in Lithuania, came to the U.S in 1928.
Levitan, Bessie (Batya) Â View Image Online
 Age: 19 Year: 1930 (Ami told me that she was born in 1911)
 Birthplace:  Roll: T626_1544
 Race:  Page: 13A
 State: New York ED: 6
 County: New York Image: 0757
 Township: Manhattan
 Relationship: Daughter 1930 U.S. Federal Census • New York • New York • Manhattan (Districts 1-250) • District 6
http://images.ancestry.com/iexec?htx=View&r=an&cat=1930USFEDCEN&path=NY.New+York.Manhattan+%28Districts+1-250%29.6&id=NYT626_1544-0757 Rabbi Moshe Yosef (Maris) Levitan son of Zvi Hirsh was born in Lithuania-he was much older then 45 in 1930. He came from Kovno to New York in 1928 with his wife; Yudith nee Gerstein of Vilna and youngest daughter; Batia born in Kovno in 1911. The family lived in New York for about eight years. After a grave illness Moshe Yosef moved with his family to Eretz Israel. Batia married Shapira and had two sons; Dr. Ami Shapira, father of Ben and Ron and Dr. Yair Shapira of Israel. He also has 2 or 3 children.
The oldest son of Moshe Yosef and Yudit nee Gerstein; Nachum Levitan was born in 1900. Nachum was an attorney in Kovno. He married Dr. Ada Yetta nee Rabinovitz of Shavli and they lived in Kovno. Children;
1.Ruven Levitan was born in Kovno in 1928. Ruven survived Ghetto Kovno with his parents and they later came to Israel.
2. Rivka was born in 1932. she died at age 5 of brain
3. Yonina was born during the war in 1942. The family was in Ghetto Kovno and Adda took care of her daughter for about a year and a half - to save her life she gave her to a Lithuanian woman who she used to take care of. Ruven and his parents escaped from the ghetto and survived. Baby Yonina was taken by the Germans shortly before the war ended in Lithuania. she was seen alive three days before the war ended. The family never found trace of her past that date.
Ruven married Ilana (daughter of Yechiel Zadok Rosenbloom and Erna nee Helberg from the "Rakower Libenheim" line)
They had Dr. Daniel Levitan (father of Carmel, Alon, Ron Oren and Talia). Ed Levitan, Ph.D.father of Rebecca) Arnold Levitan (father of Jacob, Sara,
2.The oldest girl married Shershvski and died with her baby while giving birth.
3. Dr.Chyena married Shershvski (her then dead sister widower) They had Muki (Mordchai ) and Zvi. Mr. Sheshvski was in London for business when the war broke he survived and went to the US Ziv and Muck were taken during the children action in Ghetto Coven. They were killed with the other children. Cheyenne survived and joined her husband in the U. S- she was a college instructor in Psychology in Boston and later in Bar Liana in Israel.
4. Ben Zion was a Zionist he came to Raanana and married Gita (Daughter of Leib Kriger and Sheina nee Levin/ Loria of Vashki Lithuania; Dr. Avi Levitan, Ariela Yaakobi, Nava Tal and Ofra Levi all of Israel are their children. Source: Eilat Gordin Levitan (wife of Dr. Daniel Levitan, Great grandson of Rabbi Moshe Yosef (Maris) Levitan)
click for the original
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:29:23 (PST)
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Gerstein William 27
1930 Gerstein David Head of family 30 years old born in Russia, came to the U.S ion 1914 wife Alla daughter Naomi 4 years old
1930 U.S. Federal Census • New York • Bronx • Bronx (Districts 251-500) • District 323 .
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:26:51 (PST)
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I'm looking for information about my grandfather,Jozef Paliwoda, son of Aleksander Paliwoda and Elisabeth - born Lawor. He was born in 1908. Whoever has any information about the history of the family Paliwoda, especially about my grandfather, Jozef Paliwoda can write me. It would be great if someone could contact me because these information are very imortant for me and my family. You can eiter write in English, French or German.
Thanks very much
Kai Büttner
Büttner ThueringerGeschichte@gmx.de .
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:26:07 (PST)
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Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz c1900
ALKENITZKI A M husband of Miriam Lipshitz year; 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wed 2 Tamuz ALKENITZKI A M husband of Miriam Lipshitz 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wed 2 Tamuz BAKSHT M Y 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses R. Zeinwil
BROIDA Beila bas Moshe fiancee of Shmuel Sheinok 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #60 BROIDA Beila bas Moshe wife of Shmuel Sheinok 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85 wed 8 Nisan
BROIDA Beila fiancee of Shmuel Sheinok 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #57 BUNIMOWITZ Dov 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
BUNIMOWITZ Dov Eliahu 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
BUNIMOWITZ D A 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #48 on the occasion of Pidyon HaBen of Daniel Poliak BUNIMOWITZ B 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #190 owner of preservative? factory
BUNIMOWITZ D A 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #82
BUNIMOWITZ D A 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #213
BUNIMOWITZ Daniel husband of Chaya Rozenthal 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #87 wed 3 Nisan
BUNIMOWITZ Dovid? Eli? 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 guest at Kloizner-Zabludovski wedding
BUNIMOWITZ Ester wife of Mordechai Ziebel 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85 wed 3 Adar TRN"Ch
BUNIMOWITZ Yisroel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28
BUNIMOWITZ Yosef husband of Sarah Flokin 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #190 wed 18 Elul CHALES Duber 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 at Sheinok Bris
CHASKES Sh D father of Z 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding
CHASKES Z ben Sh D 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding CHAYAT Y N 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #36
CHURGIN Chana 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #115
CHURGIN Chana 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Shukian Barmitzvah
CHURGIN Chanah 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #156
CHURGIN Chanah 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 guest at Tiles-Epshtein engagement
CHURGIN Chavah 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #27
CHURGIN Yeshaya husband of Shoshana Shlosberg 1901 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #215 wed
CHURGIN Yeshei 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Shukian Barmitzvah
CHURGIN Yeshei' 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #115
CHURGIN Yeshei' 1901 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #77 on occasion of Zalkind-Einhorn wedding
CHURGIN Yeshei' 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #42 guest at Gurliand-Rozenkrantz wedding DAYACH Sofia wife of Yisroel Goldberg 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 wed 4 January
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:24:38 (PST)
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BUNIMOWITZ Miriam bas Yitzchok Aizik wife of Chaim Lewin 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129 wed
BUNIMOWITZ Yisroel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Opatow
BUNIMOWITZ Yitzchak Aizik father of Miriam 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129 DOVIDZON Eli 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Chodosh
DOVIDZON Moshe 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Chodosh
DUBOWSKI husband of Anna Perski 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wedEILPEROWITZ A Y 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
EINBINDER Shaul Asher 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
ELPERN Yakov Moredechai husband of Malka Swirski 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21 wed trgch GERSHTEIN Gershon 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6
GERSHTEIN Gershon 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
GERSHTEIN Yona 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6
GERSHTEIN Yona 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon GORDON A 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
GORDON A M 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
GORDON Dovid 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6
GORDON Dovid 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
GORDON Eliezer Moshe 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
GORDON Gitl sister of Shaul wife of Yisroel Glazer 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wed 5 Tamuz
GORDON Leib 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
GORDON M 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
GORDON Meir 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Gordon
GORDON N 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
GORDON Shaul brother of Gitl 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
HORWITZ A 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85
HORWITZ Ari Leib 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
HORWITZ Avraham fatehr of Tzila 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
HORWITZ Rivka bas Shmuel wife of Eliezer Sheinik 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #234 wed 1897
HORWITZ Shalom 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
HORWITZ Shlomo ben Yosef Tzvi husband of Tzila 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21 wed 1897/8
HORWITZ Shmuel father of Rivka 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #234
HORWITZ Tzila bas Avraham wife of Shlomo 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21 wed 1897/8
HORWITZ Yosef Tzvi father of Shlomo 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
HORWITZ Zusman 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
HURWITZ A 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Gordon
HURWITZ Osher 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
HURWITZ Zusman 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6
ISERLIN
KANTOROWITZ Meir father of Miriam 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #151
KANTOROWITZ Miriam bas Meir wife of Reuven Antokolski of Kovno 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #151 wed 10 Tamuz
KOPELOWITZ Avraham Dov 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Gemilus Chesedeim veEmes
KOPELOWITZ Dovid 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #22 from Shkod
KREMER Shlomo 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
KREMER Tzvi 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
KROMNIK Yakov 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses R. Zeinwil
LEWIN Aizik Halevi husband of Chaya Foks 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129 wed
LEWIN Chaim husband of Miriam Bunimowitz 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129 wed
LEWIN Eizik ber 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Hagadol
LEWIN Hiene 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #145
LEWIN Moshe 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
LEWIN Moshe Chaim 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Zaretzer Beis Hakneses
LEWIN Reuven Moshe 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses R. Zeinwil
LEWIN Sh 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
LEWIN Shaul 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Opatow
LEWIN Shmuel 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
LEWINSOHN LIPSHITZ Miriam wife of Mr. A M Alkenitzki 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wed 2 Tamuz
LIPSHITZ Moshe 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
LIPSHITZ Yosef Eliezer 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
LIPSHITZ Yosef Eliezer 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol Synagogue
LIPSHITZ Yosef Eliezer 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
MANKEWITZ Yakov 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Zaretzer Beis Hakneses
MEIZEL M 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Zaksh
MEIZEL Shmuel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
MEIZIL Avraham f-i-l of Zalman 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
PERLMAN Yeshiyahu 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
PERSKI Anna bas Avraham wife of Dubowski 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163 wed
PERSKI Avraham father of Anna 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
PIALKA Avraham Alia 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon PODZELWER Betzalel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Zetel POLIAK Gershon 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #33
RAGOLER Sh 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85
RAGOLER Sh 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
RAGOLER Y A 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
RAGOWIN M 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
RAPHELOWSKI Leib husband of Gitel Zakheim 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #232 wed 1894
RAPOPORT M 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
ROM Menachem G 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
RUBIN Yakov Moshe 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses R. Zeinwil SHAPIRO Yehoshua Heshil 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
SHAPIRO Zalman 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Zetel
SHEINIK Eliezer husband of Chaya Zakheim 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
SHEINIK Eliezer husband of Rivka Horwitz 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #234 wed 1897
SHEINIK Katriel ben Eliezer & Chaya 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150 born 1897
SHEINOK A Y 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #57
SHEINOK A Y 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #60
SHEINOK A Y 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85
SHEINOK Aharon 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192 Kloiz Gesher Hayarok
SHEINOK Aharon 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Green Bridge
SHEINOK Aharon Yakov 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
SHEINOK Aharon Yakov brother of Yisroel Eidil & Shmuel 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
SHEINOK Avraham Yakov 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
SHEINOK Eliezer 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85
SHEINOK Eliezer 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192 Kloiz Gesher Hayarok
SHEINOK Eliezer 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Kloiz Green Bridge
SHEINOK Eliezer 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
SHEINOK Eliezer ben Shmuel Mordechai 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 Bris 15 Teves 1898
SHEINOK Reine 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
SHEINOK Reine 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192
SHEINOK Shmuel 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
SHEINOK Shmuel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192
SHEINOK Shmuel 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
SHEINOK Shmuel brother of Yisroel Eidil & Aharon Yakov 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
SHEINOK Shmuel fiance of Beila Broida 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #57
SHEINOK Shmuel fiance of Beila Broida 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #60
SHEINOK Shmuel husband of Beila Broida 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85 wed 8 Nisan
SHEINOK Shmuel Mordechai 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192
SHEINOK Shmuel Mordechai 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Antokol - Kloiz Elyon
SHEINOK Shmuel Mordechai father of Eliezer
SHEINOK Y A 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #57
SHEINOK Y A 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #60
SHEINOK Yisroel Eidel 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #85
SHEINOK Yisroel Eidel 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192 Beis Hamidrash D
SHEINOK Yisroel Eidel 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #163
SHEINOK Yisroel Eidil brother of Aharon Yakov & Shmuel 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
SLONIMSKI Chana wife of Meir Tzvi Zakheim 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #50 wed
TARSHISH Yakov Binyomin 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
TEITZ Moshe 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #21
TEITZ Shalom 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #
WEISBORD Dovid 1893 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 184
WEISBORD Dovid 1898 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #129
WEISBORD Dovid 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192
WEISBORD Dovid 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Opatow
WEISBORD Dovid Nochum husband of Menucha Hinda Golomba of Taurage 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #201 wed 3 Elul
WEISBORD Hinda Menucha 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #192 Mrs.
WEISBORD Hinda Menucha, Mrs. 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz # 192 Beis Hakneses Opatow
ZAKHEIM Chaya bas Y Zakhein wife of Eliezer Sheinik 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
ZAKHEIM Gitel bas Yoel Shimon wife of Leib Raphelowski 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #232 wed 1894
ZAKHEIM Meir Tzvi husband of Chana Slonimski 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #50 wed
ZAKHEIM Y father of Chaya Sheinik 1897 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #150
ZAKHEIM Yoel Shimon father of Gitel 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #232 from Slonim ABRAMOWITZ R 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party ABELOWITZ Yechezkel 1901 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #215 guest at Shlosberg-Churgin wedding
ABRAMSOHN L M 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #135 Gabai, Kloiz Potashkin, on Pesach, for the hungry in Bessarabia
ABRAMSOHN Leib 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 guest at Kloizner-Zabludovski wedding
ABRAMZOHN L 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding ALPEROWITZ Avraham Yehuda 1893 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #181
ALPEROWITZ Chaim mechutan of Eliahu Rubin from Rezitza (Latvia) 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #4
ALTSHULER B M 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party
ANGLOWITZ M 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party
ANGLOWITZ M 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party
ANILEWITZ Moshe of Libau 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Popirmeister-Lipshitz wedding
ANILEWITZ Yitzchok 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Popirmeister-Lipshitz wedding
ANILOWITZ Moshe 1901 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #215 guest at Shlosberg-Churgin wedding
ARENSOHN G 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party BAKATURSKI A D 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding
BAKSHT M Y 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz BARCHANOWITZ Shimon 1901 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #215 guest at Shlosberg-Churgin wedding
BEIL B 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding BERLIN Aharon husband of Roze Lewin 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 wed
BERLIN Aydel 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #42 guest at Gurliand-Rozenkrantz wedding
BERLIN Chaim 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #20 Chovevei Tzion (Lovers of Zion)
BERLIN Rabbi Chaim father of Roza 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #12
BERLIN Roza bas Rabbi Chaim wife of Boruch Cohen of Brisk 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #12 wed 2 Teves
BERLIN widow Roze bas Rabbi Chaim wife of Boruch ben Chaim HaCohen of Brisk 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #12 wed 2 Teves
BERLIN Y 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #34 on occasion of Mazal-Shatzki wedding
BERMAN Feitil b-i-l of Binyomin Shik 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #190 doctor
BERMAN Lipa s-i-l of Binyomin Shik 1903 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #204
BHK Yakov 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #185 on occasion of Weisbord-Glemba wedding
BLOCH Husband of daughter of Menachem Gavriel Rom 1894 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #48 Doctor, wed 10 Adar BLUMBERG Yakov 1899 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #6 at Sheinok Bris
BOLOSHER A 1895 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Rozowski Silver Wedding party
BROIDA Binyomin 1900 Vilnius, Lith. Hamelitz #28 guest at Popirmeister-Lipshitz wedding
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:23:25 (PST)
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n a message dated 1/17/03 4:26:50 AM Pacific Standard Time, klaczko@.... writes:
1] Mordechai Sheiniuk was a son of Shloime Sheinuk (certainly not of "Kirnichn Dvorchane" = ?Dvoire Chane? = Devora Chana) and owner of a brick factory in Antokolsk, a quarter of Vilna, where also my grandfather Ioshe Ryndziun (killed in the Ghetto about 1941) had his transportation and trade yard. I try to remember the building of this brick factory and I assume that I have seen it about 500 meters away from my grandfather's yard (= Ryndziuns Heif = Yard). Both were located on different shore sides of the small river Vileike. My grandfather Ioshe Ryndziun was a son of Shloime Leizerowicz Ryndziun, born Shloime Sheiniuk and renamed Ryndziun as a child, to avoid be captured as a "cantonist" recruit for the Tzarist Army. This suggessts that the father of Leizer Sheiniuk, my grand-grand-grand-father, was on his turn probably a son of a Shloime Sheiniuk, who lived about 1700. Leizer Sheiniuk was the owner of a saw mill in Mikhailishok (= Mikhaliski) near Vilna. Please look at the genealogy diagram attached herewith). [
On the Front Line in Lithuania, 1915
by Anatolii Chayesh
Town of Smorgon, District of Oshmiany; September 5 1915
....On that day, September 5, the warehouses were burned, except for the platform where the kerosene storage of Iser Ryndziun was located. ....
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames in Russian Empire;
Ryndzyun (Vilna, Oshmyany) T: from the village Ryndzyuny (Oshmyany d.) {Rindzyun, Rydzyun, Rindzyunskij, Ryndzyunskij}.
Ryndzyun (Vilna, Oshmyany) T: from the village Ryndzyuny (Oshmyany d.)
Ryndzyunskij (Vilna, Oshmyany, Petersburg) T: see Ryndzyun
Page Record # Surname Given Name Father Birth Year / Age Death Hebrew Date Row Grave Town Uyezd Guberniya Cemetery LivedAt
21 57 RINDZEIN Yaakov Borukh 1844 3 February 1942 16 Shevat 5702
Stulg (Stulginskio?) 44 40 Kaunas Kaunas Kaunas
The 1915 Vsia Vilna Database
RINDZYUN Itsko son of Shliom Aleksandrovsky Boulevard 30 1915 247
VilniusVilniusVilnius Vsia Vilna (City Directory)
RINDZYUN Khona son of Sholom Kalvariyskaya Street 1915 247 Own Home VilniusVilniusVilnius Vsia Vilna (City Directory)
RINDZYUN Kiv son of Shliom Stefanovskay Street 5 1915 247
VilniusVilniusVilnius picture Vilnius, Lithuania BFC-00194 http://216.239.33.100/custom?q=cache:tRWy9lf8fPoC:www.bfcollection.net/cities/vilnius.html+RiNDZIUN+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
VILNIUS , Lithuania. Group of former members of the Jewish anti-Nazi resistance during World War II in the Valakumpiai forest near Vilnius. From R to L: 2nd, Moishe Rindziun; 3rd, Berl Shershnevsky with his son Stashek; in the back row - Burgin.(Burgin lives in Israel) Photo ca. 1946.
Surname Given Name Father Born Residence in Ghetto Day Month Year Town Uyezd Guberniya Record / Publication Source PAGE in Vilna Gaon Publication
RYNDZIUN Anna 1927 Ligonines 5 - 7 - 9 May 1942 Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania 130
RYNDZIUN Aron 1893 Ligonines 5 - 7 - 9 May 1942 Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania 130
RYNDZIUN ChananIsak 1926 Ligonines 5 - 7 - 9 May 1942 Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania 130
RYNDZIUN Rosa 1901 Ligonines 5 - 7 - 9 May 1942 Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania 130
Vilijampole
Kaunas
Kaunas
RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Honon Shlioma Head of Household 50
1898
29685549 Family list
KRA/I-61/1/1630 RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Abram Abel Honon Son 29
RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Izrael Honon Son 26
RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Iser Honon Son 26
RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Leyzer Honon Son 21 12 in 1888
RIMDZUN (RIMDZIUN) Goda Wife 49 Chonan RYMDZUN
Born: Vilnius
Mother:
Edith ?
Born: Russia
Died: Vilna ? RYMDZU
Esther N
Born: 1878, Russia
Died: 22 Dec 1924, Milwaukee, Wi Spouse: Yankel VAKS-ZYSKOND
Born: 10 Oct 1875, Oshmiany
Died: 14 Feb 1943, Russia
Children:
Ralph VAKS-ZYSKOND Born: 20 Dec 1911, Vilnius. Died: 22 Dec 1961, Milwaukee, Wi.
Rachel VAKS-ZYSKOND Born: 1 Aug 1907, Vilnius. Died: 6 Jun 1997, Milwaukee, Wi.
Mordecai VAKS-ZYSKOND Born: 23 Mar 1903, Vilnius. Died: 28 Jun 1977, Milwaukee, Wi.
Spouse: Lena G. GROSSMAN
Born: 9 Nov 1904, Russia
Died: 2 Nov 1969, Milwaukee, Wi
Children:
David M. WAX, Living.
Phillip M. WAX Born: 28 Jan 1936, Milwaukee, Wi. Died: 14 Sep 1993, Milwaukee, Wi.
Robert E. WAX, Living.
Judith E. WAX, Living.
Morton WAX Born: 23 Mar 1903, Vilna, Lithuania. Died: 28 Jun 1977, Milwaukee, Wi.
Samuel SHAINOCK
Born: 18 Mar 1907, Houston, Harris, Texas
Died: 21 Nov 1990, Houston, Harris, Texas
Spouse: Ruby Lee BRESKY, Living Children:
Lynda SHAINOCK Spouse: Norman PETERS Children:
Caitlin PETERS
Ian PETERS
Susan SHAINOCK pouse: Jeffrey PENN Children:
Kevin PENN
Kacie PENN
Lois SHAINOCK Lois Shainock Blank - nnljorg@.....
Spouse: BLANK Children:
Sharla BLANK
Larry and Sarie Shainock donated Renewed Each Day: Daily Twelve Step Recovery Medications Based on the Bible in honor of their son, Eric’s birthday..
Larry and Sarie Shainock donated Renewed
www.bethelnertamid.com/library.html
Julie Shainock Pearson and Scott Pearson Welcome to our many new members
We are New Mexico's oldest continuing Reform Jewish Institution and celebrated our Centennial Year in 1997. Congregation Albert Home Page
ANNE SHAINOCK SSN 467-03-8918 Residence:
77096 Houston, Harris, TX
Born 26 Aug 1906 Last Benefit:
77096 Houston, Harris, TX
Died Nov 1980 Issued:
TX (Before 1951)
EPHRIAM SHAINOCK SSN 451-54-2150 Residence:
77071 Houston, Harris, TX
Born 17 Feb 1905 Last Benefit: Died Dec 1971 Issued:
TX (1951)
JAKE SHAINOCK
SSN 451-54-1918 Residence:
Texas
Born 11 Apr 1901 Last Benefit:
Died May 1965 Issued:
TX (1951)
LILLIAN SHAINOCK
SSN 457-20-8977 Residence: Born 24 Jun 1923 Last Benefit:
77071 Houston, Harris, TX
Died May 1977 Issued:
TX (Before 1951)
LILY SHAINOCK
SSN 458-76-4810 Residence:
77055 Houston, Harris, TX
Born 25 Sep 1909 Last Benefit:
Died Oct 1982 Issued:
TX (1962)
MORRIS SHAINOCK
SSN 454-03-4545 Residence:
77002 Houston, Harris, TX
Born 27 Nov 1902 Last Benefit:
Died 31 Oct 1987 Issued:
TX (Before 1951)
SAMUEL SHAINOCK
SSN 451-54-2149 Residence:
Born 18 Mar 1907 Last Benefit:
Died 21 Nov 1990 Issued:
TX (1951)
SARAH SHAINOCK Request Information (SS-5)
SSN 455-76-8818 Residence:
77025 Houston, Harris, TX
Born 20 Mar 1878 Last Benefit:
Died May 1970 Issued:
TX (1962)
Surname Given Name Middle Name Suffix Death Date Social Security Number Spouse's Surname Spouse's Given Name Spouse's Middle Name Spouse's Suffix Death County Gender Marital Status
Shainock Jack 23 May 1965 HARRIS M SINGLE
Shainock Sarah P 24 May 1970 HARRIS F WIDOWED
Shainock Ephraim 03 December 1971 HARRIS M SINGLE
Shainock Lillian 01 May 1977 HARRIS F
Shainock Anne K 18 November 1980 HARRIS F
Shainock Lily 05 October 1982 HARRIS F
Shainock Morris 31 October 1987 HARRIS m
Shainock Samuel 21 November 1990 HARRIS M
Houston, Texas City Directory, 1917
Name Trade Business Business Address Residence Address Telephone Comments
Jacob Shainock clk John Mendlovitz bds: 1113 Chartres
Louis Shainock fur dlr res: 1113 Chartres
Miss Marian Shainock bds: 1113 Chartres
Morris Shainock clk Sou Loan & Jewelry Co bds: 113 Chartres
Shainock, Morris
Del Monte Dr, Houston, TX 77056 S
Shainock, Ruby L
Post Oak Blvd, Houston, TX 77056 S
Shainock, Vic
Valkeith Dr, Houston, TX 77096 S
Shainock, Larry
Milwaukee, WI 53202 ABE SHAINUCK SSN 111-07-0030 Residence:
11375 Forest Hills, Queens, NY
Born 19 Jun 1903 Last Benefit: Died Aug 1968 Issued:
NY (Before 1951) Shainuck, Ashley 137 HALL DSQ DSQ DSQ
Race #1 Giant Slalom

REFERENCES Shainuck LI, Fouty R. Emphysematous pyelonephritis, a new case and review of previous observations. Am J Med 1968; 44 : 134
Come and see paintings and sculptures by Sara Rachmeler, Mary A. Scheinuck, Jasmine Shahbandi, and Summer Thornton. After the opening, the exhibit will be on display until the 22nd. Gallery hours are 1-4pm, Tues - Fri. UC Berkeley - Calendar of Events
Arizona 480 Gilbert Fairy Dog Mothers Terri Reed, Shannon Stevens, Jennifer Woyton, Terri Scheinuck Gilbert, Chandler, Apache Junction, Queen Creek, Tempe, Scottsdale
Inmate Escapes in San Francisco
A prisoner who was being held for battering an inmate is on the loose in the Bay Area.Joseph Scheinuck, 31, jumped out of a vehicle along the Embarcadero in San Francisco Tuesday, as San Joaquin County authorities were taking him to a rehabilitation center.Scheinuck is described as a white man, six feet tall, 190 pounds, with brown eyes and hair. He was wearing a blue-paper jumpsuit, white socks and tan jail shower shoes when he escaped.
Scheinuck, Karl
E 1st Pl, Mesa, AZ 85203
Scheinuck, Terri
E 1st Pl, Mesa, AZ 85203 Scheinuck, Alexander
Lassen St, Manteca, CA 95336
S
Scheinuck, Bettina
N Sherman Ave, Manteca, CA 95336 S
Scheinuck, Lowe G
N Sherman Ave, Manteca, CA 95336
Scheinuck, Lowe G
N Sherman Ave, Manteca, CA 95336
Scheinuck, Waldemar
Manteca, CA 95336
Scheinuck, K P
Rio Dell, CA 95562
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:20:48 (PST)
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Ellis Island records;
Name Residence Arrived Age
1 Zaretzky,Alexandr Alaschki, Russia 1912 31
2 Zaretzky,Anton Grodno, Russia 1907 17
3 Zaretzky,Beile 1896 9
4 Zaretzky,Beile Minsk, Russia 1908 20
5 Zaretzky,Chaie Wilno, Russia 1906 35
6 Zaretzky,Chail Bobonitzky, Russia 1912 20
7 Zaretzky,Chaje Polotzk, Russia 1908 20
8 Zaretzky or Saretzkaja,Elie Homel, Russia 1912 10
9 Zaretzky,Elkonen Petrikowo, Russia 1912 52
10 Zaretzky,Ester Garodnoy, Russia 1913 21
11 Zaretzky,Eta Pruzanach, Poland 1921 56
12 Zaretzky,Freide Kapkewioch, Russia 1907 20
13 Zaretzky,Giljary Alashki, Russ. 1912 39
14 Zaretzky,Hersh Mozir, Russia 1912 35
15 Zaretzky,Istvan Hungary 1906 34
16 Zaretzky,Itzko Surewitz, Russia 1913 23
17 Zaretzky,Jacob Peterko, Russia 1907 18
18 Zaretzky,Jankel Minsk, Russia 1908 18
19 Zaretzky,Jankew Moledeczno 1906 15
20 Zaretzky,Josef Wmowko, Russia 1910 19
21 Zaretzky,Judes Russia Pinsk 1911 3
22 Zaretzky or Saretzkaja,Keile Homel, Russia 1912 41
23 Zaretzky,Klara Pruzanach, Poland 1921 24
24 Zaretzky,Konstantin Pelewei, Russia 1913 24
25 Zaretzky,Leike Russia 1913 20
26 Zaretzky,Litman Wien 1906 31
27 Zaretzky,Marie Aholicz, Russia 1912 21
28 Zaretzky,Masche 1896 6
29 Zaretzky,Morduch Peterkow, Russia 1912 16
30 Zaretzky,Mowseka Beljowo, Russia 1910 26
31 Zaretzky,Nicolai Jakawetz, Russia 1912 23
32 Zaretzky,Nochem Koidanowo, Russia 1910 20
33 Zaretzky,Nochim Bobonitzky, Russia 1912 22
34 Zaretzky,Peter Jakowitz, Russia 1912 20
35 Zaretzky,Pjotr Alaschki, Russia 1912 28
36 Zaretzky,R...ke Kalenkowitz, Russia 1914 8
37 Zaretzky,Roche 1896 47
38 Zaretzky,Rochel Minsk 1906 20
39 Zaretzky,Rosa Russia Pinsk 1911 26
40 Zaretzky,Rubin Kapkewioch, Russia 1907 2
41 Zaretzky,Sara Riwa Pietricow, Russia 1923 15
42 Zaretzky,Scheine Pietrkow, Russia 1914 19
43 Zaretzky,Schmuel Grodno 1902 28
44 Zaretzky,Schmul Maledetzne, Russia 1906 15
45 Zaretzky,Simson Kalenkowitz, Russia 1914 5
46 Zaretzky,Stisja Petrikowo, Russia 1912 57
47 Zaretzky,William 1908 40
48 Zaretzky,Zissia Pietricow, Russia 1923 48
49 Zaretzky,Ziwie Wilno, Russia 1906 9
50 Zaretzky,Zlate Kalenkowitz, Russia 1914 29
Saretzki,...twy 1893 31
Saretzki,Alter Koidenow 1902 11
Saretzki,Antoni Mazowiec, Russia 1912 22
Saretzki,Antoni Konojk 1903 20
Saretzki,Taube Walkewisk 1906 30
Saretzki,Jente Walkewisk 1906 4
Saretzki,Jitte Walkewisk 1906 3
Saretzki,Josef Walkewisk 1906 2
Saretzki,Basche Walkewisk 1906 6
Saretzki,Bertha 1894 28
Saretzki,Chane Porosow, Russia 1907 30
Saretzki,Chane Drogitchise, Russia 1907 40
Saretzki,Chane Rasewi, Russia 1906 26
Saretzki,Eli Porosow, Russia 1907 3
Saretzki,Sure Witebske 1905 40
Saretzki,Glitmaz Witebesk 1905 11
Saretzki,Jossel Witebste 1905 5
Saretzki,Leil Witebsk 1905 9
Saretzki,Gwan Nowiskowitze, Russia 1910 19
Saretzki,Ite Rasewi, Russia 1906 3
Saretzki,Jan Grejawa, Russia 1911 34
Saretzki,Jankel Rigun, Russia 1909 38
Saretzki,Janos ... 1906 36
Saretzki,Josef Gasiswoska, Russia 1907 32
Saretzki,Josef Jasinow, Russia 1912 37
Saretzki,Jossel Porosow, Russia 1907 6
Saretzki,Jossel Drogitchise, Russia 1907 40
Saretzki,Jsrael Wilna, 1905 19
Saretzki,Rode Wilna, 1905 21
Saretzki,Leib Rotterdam 1904 29
Saretzki,Liebe Liborfke 1904 19
Saretzki,Michael Markowzo 1903 24
Saretzki,Philip Brestko, Russia 1910 20
Saretzki,Raman Prazaic, Russia 1910 31
Saretzki,Sofia ..., Russia 1910 18
Saretzki,Vicktor Stoh 1904 23
Saratzki,Andezi Kalisch 1893 43
Saretski,Josef Rudowki 1899 25
Saretski,Stefan Grodno 1907 20
Saretzkin,Leiser Welisch 1904 32
Saretzkin,Sieme Kowno 1906 23
Saretzkin,Wichue Kowno 1906 11
Zaretzki,Abala Spasaapa, Germany 1907 24
Zaretzki,Abrahm Petrikow, Minsk 1907 37
Zaretzki,Abram Botkic, Russia 1912 33
Zaretzki,Adelenna Zitomia 1902 2
Zaretzki,Adoline Zitomia 1902 3
Zaretzki,Albertine Zitomia 1902 33
Zaretzki,Anna Zitomia 1902 49
Zaretzki,Benjamin Russia 1913 8
Zaretzki,Benzion Kobylauki, Russia 1911 17
Zaretzki,Czarme Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 42
Zaretzki,Dine Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 14
Zaretzki,Dobe Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 16
Zaretzki,Golde Wilno 1897 52
Zaretzki,Gotlieb Zitomia 1902 33
Zaretzki,Gustav Zitomia 1902 16
Zaretzki,Hezel Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 7
Zaretzki,Jecze Sascowitz, Russia 1910 17
Zaretzki,Johann Zitomia 1902 4
Zaretzki,Leike Molodecrno, Russia 1913 20
Zaretzki,Martha Gladbeck, Germany 1923 14
Zaretzki,Matze Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 11
Zaretzki,Mine Russia 1913 11
Zaretzki,Moishe Kebryn, Poland 1921 9
Zaretzki,Molke Russia 1913 30
Zaretzki,Moritz 1921 25
Zaretzki,Mottel Russia 1904 33
Zaretzki,Perl Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 8
Zaretzki,Reinhold Zitomia 1902 8
Zaretzki,Riwe Russia 1913 6
Zaretzki,Schlaime Bender, Russia 1909 54
Zaretzki,Slate Russia 1913 3
Zaretzki,Tobias Smargon 1899 35
Zaretzki,Vincenti 1910
Zaretski,Adam Radinkendorf, Germany 1913 12
Zaretski,Avon Petrikow, Russia 1913 6
Zaretski,Chassie Petrikow, Russia 1913 0
Zaretski,Avon Petrikow, Russia 1913 6
Zaretski,Chome Petrikow, Russia 1913 8
Zaretski,Cheije Wlotzlov, Poland 1920 9
Zaretzkin,Breine Kopisz 1900 18
Zaretzkina,Chawa Kopis, Russia 1923 22
Zaretzkina,Chawa Kopis, Russia 1923 22
Zaretzkin,Daird Paris, France 1914 10
Zaretzkin,Rosa Paris, France 1914 30
Zaretzkin,Suzanne Paris, France 1914 11
Zarefzki,Bernard Paris, France 1914 40
Zareczky,Abraham Paris, France 1914 38
Zaretsky,Beila Paris, France 1923 40
Zereszky,Rifke Steble, Russia 1910 20
Zaraczki,Andras Oszkurasya 1900 17
Zaretsky,Basheva Bucarest., Roumania 1921 34
Zaraczki,Joh. 1896 30
Zarecski,Janos Seina 1905 24
Zareczki,Mihaly Ilonokujfalu, Hungary 1914 15
Zareczki,Daniel Ilonokujfalu, Hungary 1914 42
Zareczki,Demeter Ilonoknjfalu, Hungary 1914 38
Zareczky,Grzsebet Budapest 1904 38
Zareczky,Susanna Budapest 1904 8
Zareczky,Tamas Budapest 1904 55
Zareczky,Janos Budapest 1904 6
Zareczki,Jasep Tenye, Hungary 1912 48
Zareczky,Bela Tenke, Hungary 1910 46
Zarecsky,Anna Tenke, Hungary 1910 15
Zareczky,Ilona Tenke, Hungary 1910 19
Zareczky,Julia Tenke, Hungary 1910 17
Zareczki,Janos Palanka, Hungary 1910 3
Zareczki,Francziska Palanka, Hungary 1910 29
Zareczki,Maria Palanka, Hungary 1910 4
Zareczki,Rosa Palanka, Hungary 1910 7
Zareczki,Janos Palanka 1907 33
Zareczki,Janos Pany 1902 40
Zareczky,Janos Fragucecz, Hungary 1911 18
Zarecsky,Fnire Spacza, Hungary 1912 17
Zareczky,Michal Spacza, Hungary 1906 28
Zarecsky,Tzanilor Spacza 1905 26
Zaraczky,Josef Vemndivo 1899 22
Zareczky,Franz Non Immigrant 1908 30
Zareczky,Mihaly Lecroon, U.S.A. 1912 32
Zareczky,Rudolf Topacza, Austria 1912 19
Zareczki,Emilia Stomfa, Austria 1911 18
Zareczky,Antonia Stomfa, Hungary 1913 17
Zareczki,Ester Wilna, Russia 1912 20
Zaretsky,Abram Wilna 1902 29
Zareczki,Josef Russia, Dowejnonis 1913 19
Zaraczky,Josef Vemndivo 1899 22
Zaratzky,Salomon 1892 18
Zaretsky,...aite 1896 22
Saretzkyja,Zeita Belfow, Russia 1910 16
1 Saretzky,Abrahm Welisch, Witebsk, Russia 1907 3
2 Saretzky,Abram 1892 19
3 Saretzky,Abram Smorgon 1907 16
4 Saretzky,Adam Suwalki 1905 26
5 Saretzky,Alexander Alashny, Wilno 1909 29
6 Saretzky,Basse Mohilew 1906 18
7 Saretzky,Benzion Mohilow 1906 11
8 Saretzky,Berko Bogrebowicz, Russia 1912 24
9 Saretzky,Bernhard Wahrstadt 1901 0
10 Saretzky,Boruk Minsk 1906 18
11 Saretzky,Breine Muisk 1904 25
12 Saretzky,Carl 1895 21
13 Saretzky,Celig Wilna 1905 17
14 Saretzky,Chail Reive 1893 40
15 Saretzky,Chaim Mosyr, Russia 1909 6
16 Saretzky,Chana Staro Sielzy 1906 13
17 Saretzky,Chawe Muisk 1904 3
18 Saretzky,David Mohilow 1906 0
19 Saretzky,Dwosse Mohilow 1906 44
20 Saretzky,Eidla Shitkowitz, Russia 1911 19
21 Saretzky,Emil Berlin 1904 54
22 Saretzky,Emma Berlin 1904 12
23 Saretzky,Ester Seltz 1906 38
24 Saretzky,Esther 1893 12
25 Saretzky,Feigle Petrikov, Russia 1910 20
26 Saretzky,Feije Snakowitz, Russia 1907 24
27 Saretzky,Franz Srewalk 1904 19
28 Saretzky,Giljary Alashny, Wilna 1909 37
29 Saretzky,Hatke 1893 11
30 Saretzky,Hirsch Petrikov, Russia 1910 43
31 Saretzky,Hisse Mosyr, Russia 1909 3
32 Saretzky,Hulde Wahrstadt 1901 19
33 Saretzky,Iguaz Kowno 1906 18
34 Saretzky,Israel Wilna 1905 18
5 Saretzky,Israel Mohilow 1906 44
36 Saretzky,Itte Mosyr, Russia 1909 27
37 Saretzky,Iwan Grodno, Grodno 1907 19
38 Saretzky,Jan Olane, Rusjia 1911 19
39 Saretzky,Jan Suwalki 1905 26
40 Saretzky,Jankel Ulinety, Russia 1910 28
41 Saretzky,Jankel Mosyr, Russia 1909 7
42 Saretzky,Jankel Makarizi, Russia 1912 16
43 Saretzky,Jankeo Petrikov, Russia 1910 24
44 Saretzky,Josel Witebsk, Russia 1907 30
45 Saretzky,Jtzchok Staro Sielzy 1906 11
46 Saretzky,Leib Kowno 1904 44
47 Saretzky,Leiser Muisk 1904 0
48 Saretzky,Liebe Mohilow 1906 16
49 Saretzky,Lippe Mohilow 1906 3
50 Saretzky,Maria Berlin 1904 53
Saretzky,Marsche Petrikov, Russia 1910 16
3 Saretzky,Martin Wahrstadt 1901 29
4 Saretzky,Mime Durgams 1904 50
5 Saretzky,Minna Kopis 1905 18
1 Saretsky,Margarethe Berlin 1903 27
2 Saretsky,Maria Berlin 1903 16
3 Saretsky,Mein Rotterdam 1899 25
4 Saretsky,Mordco Bojurk, Russia 1921 47
5 Saretsky,Mosche Laban 1904 55
Saretzky,Neclomie Laskowitz 1904 28
Saratzky,Salman Masyrl, Russia 1909 28
2 Saretsky,Chatze Mohilow 1906 8
3 Saretsky,Cheina Bojurk, Russia 1921 19
4 Saretsky,Dissel Wilno 1904 20
5 Saretsky,Duee Laskowitz 1904 28
Saretzkyja,Zeita Belfow, Russia 1910 16
Saretzky,Neclomie Laskowitz 1904 28
Saretzky,Rachmiel Kowno 1904 19
Saretzky,Risse Welich, Witebsk, Russia 1907 38
Saretzky,Rudje 1893 8
Saratzky,Salman Masyrl, Russia 1909 28
Saretzky,Salman 1905 23
Saretzky,Scheftel Welisch, Witebsk, Russia 1907 4
Saretzky,Schmerke Petrikov, Russia 1910 48
Saretzky,Semen Koski, Russia 1912 40
Saretzky,Shane Kowno 1903 24
Saretzky,Shane Kowno 1903 24
Saretzky,Sime Seletz 1907 16
Saretzky,Simke Petrikov, Russia 1910 15
Saretzky,Sore Petrikov, Russia 1910 22
Saretzky,Sterne Welich, Witebsk, Russia 1907 8
Saretzky,Welwel Staro Sielzy 1906 9
Saretzky,Wladislaw Radi 1903 18
Saretzky,Ziric Wilna 1905 42
Saretzkyja,Zeita Belfow, Russia 1910 16
.
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:11:51 (PST)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
In a message dated 1/18/03 8:39:55 PM Pacific Standard Time, Potchins@aol.com writes: researching: ZARETSKY- Molodechno
AXELROD- Molodechno
In the Ellis Island data;
Zaretzky,Jankew Moledeczno 1906 15y
Zaretzky,Schmul Maledetzne, Russia 1906 15y
Axelrod,Jacko Isacko Molodeszno 1902 26y
Axelrod,Refael Moladeczno, Russia 1913 17y
Molodechno district is situated in the north-west of the Minsk region.
72 kilometers away from Minsk at the
crossing of Minsk-Vilnius and Grodno-St Petersburg railway lines

Its territory is equal to 1.37 thousand square km with the centre in the town of Molodechno. The population (the town of Molodechno excluded) - 48,494 people. Administratively the region is divided into 1 town and 14 village Councils, on its territory there are 277 administrative units.
from the Official Site of Minsk Region Administration
From Jewishgen; Maladzyechna, Vileika uezd, Vilna gubernia, Latitude: 5419' Longitude: 2651'
Also known as Molodechno, Molodeczno, and Molodetchno
You should register at;JewishGen Family Finder http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~jgff~C
Jews who came to the U.S from Molodeczno/Moledezno Russia/ Poland (today in Belarus)
Abrahamson,David Molodeczno 1906 15y
2 Alperowitz,Beile Molodeczno, Russia 1911 31y
3 Alperowitz,Dwsire Molodeczno, Russia 1911 7y
4 Alperowitz,Elie Molodeczno, Russia 1911 10y
5 Alperowitz,Leiser Molodeczno, Russia 1911 4y
6 Alperowitz,Sone Molodeczno, Russia 1911 6y
7 Altschuler,Berko Molodeczna, Poland 1921 15y
8 Altschuler,Chaja Molodeczna, Poland 1921 35y
9 Altschuler,Zahuan Molodeczna, Poland 1921 9y
10 Axelrod,Jacko Isacko Molodeszno 1902 26y
11 Axelrod,Refael Moladeczno, Russia 1913 17y
1 Baranowicz,Hirsch Maladeczne, Russia 1913 21
2 Batwinick,Aron Maladezna 1904 28y Passenger
3 Behrman,Wulf Molodetzno, Wilna 1907 55y
4 Bereger,Beile Moledezno 1906 4y
5 Bereger,Itle Moledezno 1906 2y
6 Bereger,Josef Moledezno 1906 7y
7 Bereger,Rochel Moledezno 1906 31y
8 Berman,Sosche Malodeezne, Russia 1911 18y
9 Bermann,Basche Moldezno, Russia 1906 20y
10 Bermann,Fenve Maladozna 1904 18
11 Bermann,Hillel Molodeszin, Russia 1912 16y
12 Bermann,Nochem Molodozno 1904 24y Passenger
13 Brudner,Mendel Malodeczna, Russia 1907 60y
14 Budner,Alter Moladezno 1906 17y
15 Budner,Beile Moladezno 1906 57y
16 Budner,Elke Moladezno 1906 15y
Cahn,Minni Maldesnie 1906 25y
2 Chait,Riwke Molodezni 1904 20y
3 Chodes,Boruch Molodeczno, Russia 1912 10y
4 Chodes,Chaja Molodeczno, Russia 1912 11y 9m
5 Chodes,Leiser Molodeczno, Russia 1912 11y
6 Chodes,Leja Molodeczno, Russia 1912 38y
7 Chodes,Srol Israel Molodeczno, Russia 1912 7y
8 Chodesch,Abraham Molodozna, Russia 1910 36y
1 Deitz,Chane Nolodeegno 1906 20y
2 Deitz,Rafael Nolodeegno 1906 5y
3 Deitz,Slota Nolodeegno 1906 3y
4 Dworkin,Feige Moldeczno 1906 10
5 Dworkin,Leie Moldeczno 1906 35
1 Edelman,Majer Mlodizne, Russia 1912 18y
2 Elperowitz,Hindle Maladetzne 1905 19y
3 Erdelmann,Abram Molodeczna, Russia 1911 16y
1 Finklestein,Mottel Moladetzen, Russia 1912 17
1 Goches,Abram Molodecin, Russia 1914 4y 9m
2 Goches,Eida Molodecin, Russia 1914 45y
3 Goches,Marjascha Molodecin, Russia 1914 17y
4 Goches,Meier Molodecin, Russia 1914 14y
5 Goches,Rose Molodecin, Russia 1914 18y
6 Gordon,Leib Molodezne, Russia 1911 46y
7 Gresel,Snierl Molodiezna, Russia 1909 18y
8 Grinberg,Ester Molodeczno, Russia 1910 16y
9 Grinberg,Rochel Molodeczno, Russia 1910 11m
10 Grunstein,Schmuel Meltehim, Russia 1907 25
11 Gurwitz,Hirsch Molodezno, Russia 1907 21y
12 Gutin,Are Maldetzne, Russia 1910 10y t
2 Halison,Hinde Moledezno 1904 40y
3 Halison,Jankel Moledezno 1904 9y
4 Halison,Malus Moledezno 1904 3y
5 Halison,Rubin Moledezno 1904 7y
6 Handschuler,Chajke Maldeozne, Russia 1911 17y
7 Hesse,Israel Maladesne 1905 16y
8 Hesse,Nohai Maladesne 1905 8y
9 Hesse,Rifke Maladesne 1905 42y
10 Hesse,Schifre Maladesne 1905 9y
11 Hessel,Basche Malodeczno 1903 16y
1 Jessel,Jassel Malodjetzne Wilma, Russ. 1912 26y
2 Jessel,Jossel Malodjetzno, Russia 1912 26y
1 Kagan,Schepsel Molodetzno 1907 16y
2 Kaplan,Leiser Maloditzne, Russia 1910 16y
3 Kappelowicz,Kassriel Meladetschne 1906 17y
4 Katz,Chaim Moladezno, Russia 1906 18y
5 Kaufman,Ersik Molodeczno 1904 34y
6 Kaufmann,Meyer Maladezna 1906 33y
7 Kopeliowicz,Elie Molodeczno, Russia 1912 4y
8 Kopeliowicz,Mariasche Molodeczno, Russia 1912 28y
9 Kopelowitch,Salmen Elie Molodeczno, Wilm, russia 1911 27y
10 Kopelowitz,Abram Eche Molodezno, Russia 1911 5y
11 Kopelowitz,Breine Molodezno, Russia 1911 9y
12 Kopelowitz,Hirschel Molodezno, Russia 1911 16y
13 Kopelowitz,Jachle Molodeczno, Russia 1905 19y
14 Kopelowitz,Leine Molodezno, Russia 1911 11y
1 Leivin,Boruch Maloditzne 1904 31y
2 Lewin,Abram Molodeczno, Russia 1912 43y
3 Lewin,Jierzschok Molodiczin, Ruussia 1913 21y
4 Lewin,Sofia Russia, Molodeczno 1911 17y
5 Lewin,Sosia Molodeczno, Pinsk Reg. 1922 59y
6 Lewin,Sprinre Moldeczne, Russia 1910 17y
7 Lewin,Sule Malediszny, Russia 1911 17y
8 Lewin-Wiwian,Rywka Molodeczno, Poland 1923 21y
9 Lifschitz,Frume Maldecna, Russia 1907 35y
10 Lifschitz,Mairem Maldecna, Russia 1907 3y
11 Lifschitz,Reisel Maldecna, Russia 1907 10y
12 Lifschitz,Terschel Maldecna, Russia 1907 10y
Margun,Kewe Malodecin 1904 23y P
2 Mastwilishken,Abram Molodecsno, Poland 1921 9y
3 Mastwilishken,Michla Molodecsno, Poland 1921 35y
4 Mastwilshken,Anna Molodecsno, Poland 1921 8y
5 Melcher,Abram Maladesne 1904 3y
6 Melcher,Gittel Maladesne 1904 26y
7 Meltzer,Oscher Molodeczne, Russia 1907 17y
8 Muller,Srul Molodczany, Russia 1914 53y
1 Pawlikowska,Franciska Mlodjeszin, Russia 1909 19y
2 Perlmann,Sonie Mulodechno 1904 14y
1 Rabinowitz,Dreise Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 30
2 Rabinowitz,Ellei Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 8
3 Rabinowitz,Fudel Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 10
4 Rabinowitz,Meier Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 4
5 Rabinowitz,Morduch Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 11
6 Ragosin,Moische Molodeczno 1904 22y
7 Raichlin,Ester Molodeczno, Russia 1911 23y
8 Rappoport,Chaike Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 29y
9 Rappoport,Rodane Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 19y
10 Reznik,Jankel Meltehim, Russia 1907 35
11 Rogorin,Jankel Molodesme, Russia 1912 20y
12 Rogosin,Scholem Molodetschna 1906 25y
13 Rosen,Kemie Maldesna 1905 31y
14 Rubinstein,Gerschon Malodyszyn, Russia 1911 17
1 Schmidt,Chane Molodeczna 1905 20y
2 Scholomowitz,Hene Moloderzno 1905 15y
3 Schprciregen,Dan Maladetzni, Russia 1909 8y
4 Schprciregen,Libe Maladetzni, Russia 1909 30y
5 Schprciregen,Moische Maladetzni, Russia 1909 9y
6 Schprciregen,Schloime Maladetzni, Russia 1909 3y
7 Schprciregen,Schmul Maladetzni, Russia 1909 7y
8 Schumacher,Judel Malodeszna, Russia 1907 21y
9 Spreiregen,Wulf Molodeczno 1904 30y
10 Stein,Basie Molodiecno, Russia 1909 17y
11 Stilbans,Chane Moladezno, Russia 1910 35y
12 Stilbans,Ester Moladezno, Russia 1910 7y
Travelowitz,David Maldetzne, Russia 1910 18y
1 Walperowiez,Leib Maldezn, Russia 1910 39y
2 Wilner,Abram Maladezno, Russia 1906 8y
3 Wilner,Elic Maladezno, Russia 1906 4y
4 Wilner,Frume Maladezno, Russia 1906 40y
5 Wilner,Rachmiel Maladezno, Russia 1906 9y
6 Wilner,Riske Maladezno, Russia 1906 11y
7 Wilner,Rochke Maladezno, Russia 1906 7y
8 Wilner,Sore Molodeczno 1904 19y
1 Zaretzky,Jankew Moledeczno 1906 15y
2 Zaretzky,Schmul Maledetzne, Russia 1906 15y
3 Zawadzka,Julja Molodeczno, Russia 1922 28y
4 Zuckermann,Michle Molodozno, Russia 1910 22y


Subj: Re: [belarus] Molodechna, Belarus
Date: 1/20/03 5:47:44 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: Potchins To: EilatGordn Thank you. This is fabulous. Went on site because my g/f was not listed. His papers show him coming from "Russia" not the town of Molodechna. But, could
not locate how you got this list. When I asked for "history", "emigration" I was
given "O" results. How did you do it?
At any rate, my g/f brother is on the list and I think an uncle (Jack) listed as Jankow.
This was fabulous. Thank you so very much.
Sincerely,
Maxine Potchinsky Braslow
I looked at the original manifests;
Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam December 26, 1906
Zaretzky, Schmul male 15 years old single Russia- Hebrew
Tailor going to brother; D. Saretzky Rotgers? Place New York
5'2" dark hair and blue eyes born in Maledetzne
click; Manifest Enlarger or paste;
http://wwZaretzkyw.ellisislandrecords.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DG%3A%5C%5CT715%2D0814%5C%5CT715%2D08140398%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=102345040128&name=Schmul%26nbsp%3BZaretzky&doa=December++26%2C+1906&port=Rotterdam&line=0008
April 04, 1906
Manifest for Armenia
Sailing from Hamburg
Zaretzky, Jankew male 15 years old single Russia- Hebrew scholar?
going to brother; Jeruchime? Zaretzky 100th Street, New York next to him on the manifest;
Kappelowicz, Kassriel M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Meladetschne also going to Ritger/ Richger? Place
Nawrotzky, Mosche M 35Y M Russia, Hebrew Dolginoff going to uncle in Mew York
Manifest Enlarger http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DM%3A%5C%5CT715%2D0686%5C%5CT715%2D06860213%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=102203080308&name=Jankew%26nbsp%3BZaretzky&doa=April+++++04%2C+1906&port=Hamburg&line=0008

click for the original manifest
- Thursday, March 20, 2003 at 12:09:25 (PST)