eilatgordinlevitan.com
Hillman Family
Click on Photos to Enlarge

#hlmn-1:

Israel ben Yehuda-Leib & Shaina HILLMAN (Harold Rhode)

#hlmn-2

Julius & Sarah HILLMAN RHODE (Harold Rhode)

Here are pictures of Rabbi Yitzhak Isaac Ha-Levi Herzog, David Hillman
and Sarah Hillman Herzog. These pictures of the Hillman family come
from my father Dave Kempner's photo album. They are 1st cousins of my
father. Rabbi Yitzhak and Sarah Herzog are the parents of Chaim Herzog
and Rabbi Jacob (Yaacov) David Herzog.

Marlene Kempner Dobrin
Family names: KEMPNER, POKEMPNER, PAKEMPNER, MIRVIS, RIEF, WESTERMAN,
MELMAN, SHEINKER, KRECHMER, LUNTZ, SACHS/ZOX, LITT, FLEISCHMAN,
MEYERSON/MAROVICH, HILLMAN, KOMENITZ, SEGALL, FRIEDMAN, DOBRIN,
DOBRINSKY, SCHUMAN, ITKIN, FIRESTONE, FEIRSTEIN, FOREMAN, FUXMAN

#hlmn-3:

Rabbi Yitzhak Herzog (1924)

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David Hillman (1924) son of Sheina POKEMPNER

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Sarah Hillman Herzog daughter of Sheina POKEMPNER

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Mr. Sasoon, Rabbi Yitzhak Herzog and David Hillman (1940).

Hillman

#hlmn-7:

David Hillman whose stained glass windows are
installed in the Great Synagogue in Jerusalem and the St. Johns Wood
Synagogue just outside of London (1921).

#hlmn-8:

Michle Hilman nee Wasserman

Hillman
Hillman

#hlmn-9:

Shore Mere Berman (Hillman) 
Birth:
1873
Death:
 December 1, 1941 (68) 
 (Killed by the Nazis)

#hlmn-10:

Revekka Yoffe (Hillman)
Birth:
1886 
Death:
1964 

Hillman
Hillman

#hlmn-11:

Tsivye (Sime Tsivie) Zabludofskaya (Hillman) 

Birth:
1889 
Death:
February 15, 1956 
Leningrad

 

#hlmn-12:

Yeruham-Fishel Israel  Hillman

Birth:
1839 
Linkova, Lithuania
Death:
June 6, 1909 
Baltimore

Hillman
Hillman, Wasserman

#hlmn-13:

Fishel Hillman 
Birth:
1839 
Bauska
Death:
1915 

#hlmn-14:

Yaakov Maimon, Elieazer(Lou) Wasserman, Hillel Maimon, Yohana Snop, Moshe Maimon (Wasserman), Mordehai Wasserman,Eliyahu Tsadok Wasserman, Zvi Wasserman Maimon, Lina Hillman, Rivka Borkum, Beile Golda Wasserman

Hillman, Wasserman
Hillman, Wasserman

#hlmn-15:

Benjamin Hilman with wife Lina nee Wasserman

#hlmn-16:

Benjamin Hillman, Milton David Hillman, Hava Wasserman, Philip Leo Hillman, Mordehai Wasserman, Lina Hillman 

#hlmn-17
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150&tbnw=123&ei=sI3PRaOqA7T8JLDf9ZUD&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dhillman%2Brabbi%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/h/o/Harold-Rhode-MD/PHOTO/0062photo.jpg
Rabbi Shmuel Yitzchak Hillman (1868 – June 1953) was an Orthodox
Jewish Talmudic scholar, rabbi and Dayan of the London Beth Din.

He was born in Kovno, a descendant of Rabbi Shmuel Hillman (Helman),
the Av Beth Din of Metz, who is mentioned in the introduction to the
responsa Noda BeYehuda. On his mother's side, he was a descendant of
Rabbi Michal Datnover, who was known in his time as an exceptional
scholar and Kabbalist.

Rabbi Hillman was a direct sixth-generation descendant of the author
of Knesset Yechezkel, the head of the Beth Din of Altona, Hamburg and
Wansbek, and also of the Katzenellenbogen family, and his lineage
further extended back to the Maharam (Rabbi Meir ben Isaac) of Padua
and Rabbi Yehuda Mintz.

Rabbi Hillman studied Torah under his uncles; Rabbi Mordechai Hillman,
Av Beth Din of Pasvatin, and Rabbi Noach Yaakov Hillman of Pasval.
Afterwards he studied intensively by himself in the house of his
father-in-law, Rabbi Yitzchak Hirsch in the town of Franks in Kurland.

Rabbi Hillman received Semicha from Rabbi Eliyahu Dovid Teumim, who
was the head of the Beth Din in Ponevezh and afterwards in Jerusalem.
He then received Semicha from Rabbi Refael Shapiro of Volozhin, Rabbi
Meir Simcha HaKohen of Dvinsk and the Ridvaz of Slutsk.

In 1897, when Rabbi Hillman was 29 years old, he became Rabbi and head
of the Beth Din in Ruzin in Minsk Gubernia (possibly BarysaÅ­), an old
and distinguished community that had been graced with many great
rabbis in the past. In 1908, Rabbi Hillman was appointed Rabbi in the
city of Glasgow. He served there until 1914, when he was appointed a
Dayan of the London Beth Din. He served in that capacity until his
retirement in 1934.

Death
Dayan Hillman settled in Jerusalem after retiring as Dayan in London.
There, he devoted himself to study and writing. He died in 1953. Many
thousands followed his funeral through the streets of Jerusalem, among
them Cabinet Ministers, Members of the Knesset, and leading rabbis and
heads of Yeshivas.

Eulogies were delivered by the deceased's son-in-law Israeli Chief
Rabbi Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog, Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer (with whom
Dayan Hillman learned with in the Volozhin yeshiva), the Minister of
Religious Affairs Mr Moshe Shapiro, and others. Dayan Hillman's death
caused deep sorrow in Jerusalem, where he was greatly beloved. He was
survived by his wife, his daughter Sarah, the wife of Rabbi Yitzhak
HaLevi Herzog, and his son David Hillman, a London artist.

Soon after Dayan Hillman died, a memorial service was held in London,
where the Chief Rabbi Israel Brodie and Dayan Yechezkel Abramsky
spoke, full of praise, respect and admiration for the deceased. Dayan
Lazarus, Dayan Grunfeld, Dayan Grossnass and Rabbi Dr Isidore Epstein
were among those in attendance.

[Works
Dayan Hillman authored many learned works, including a 12-volume
commentary on the Talmud entitled Or Hayashar, novellae on the
Mishnaic Orders Zeraim and Taharos and "Notes on the Tanach". He also
published a book of sermons and orations. He was the honorary director
of the Ohel Torah Institute for Rabbinic Studies (yeshiva).

Among the other writings of this outstanding figure were manuscripts
on the Talmudic tractates Zevachim, Arakhin and Temura - all in the
Order of Kodshim - and responsa on all four sections of the Shulchan
Aruch.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shmuel_Yitzchak_Hillman"

CHAIM HERZOG, 78, FORMER PRESIDENT OF ISRAEL
By ERIC PACE<
c.1997 N.Y. Times News Service<

 

Chaim Herzog, Israel's outspoken president from 1983 to 1993, died on
Thursday at Tel Hashomer Hospital in Tel Aviv. He was 78, and lived in
Herzliya Pituach, a suburb of Tel Aviv.

The cause was heart failure after he contracted pneumonia on a recent
visit to the United States, said Rachel Sofer, spokesman for the
hospital.

Herzog, a former general, was Israel's chief delegate to the United
Nations from 1975 to 1978, a critical period, after serving as its
director of military intelligence and, in 1967, as the first military
governor of the occupied West Bank. Over the years, he was also a
businessman, a lawyer, an author and a Labor Party member of the
Israeli Parliament.

In his two successive five-year terms as Israel's sixth chief of
state, he strove to enlarge the president's role, which in Israel is
largely ceremonial, by making public declarations on issues that
leaders in government would not, or could not, address.

Herzog argued in favor of greater rights for the Druse and Arab
populations in Israel, declaring: ``I am the president of Arabs and
Druse, as well as Jews.'' He worked actively to make political pariahs
of Rabbi Meir Kahane and his fervently anti-Arab Kach Party.

In addition, Herzog was an outspoken though unsuccessful lobbyist for
comprehensive change in the Israeli voting system, which has spawned a
jigsaw-puzzle of political parties and frequent parliamentary
stalemates.

By late 1987, as his first term was drawing to a close and while a
national unity government was in power, he had probably become more
influential and popular than any previous Israeli president.

This was largely because the Labor and Likud party partners in that
government were always bickering and frequently turned to him to
arbitrate their disagreements. Moreover, groups of Israelis, like
farmers and nurses, were always looking to him for aid that they could
not get from the deadlocked Cabinet.

Through the years, Herzog also made use of the Israeli president's
power to pardon convicted criminals—and sometimes was criticized for
doing so. In addition, he exercised the president's power to
determine, after elections, which political party has the first
opportunity to assemble a government.

His urbane, outgoing nature and his earlier roles in his country's
life fitted him to serve as a symbol of Israeli unity during his years
as president.

A descendant of rabbis, and a witness of Nazi concentration-camp
horrors while he was an officer in the British army in World War II,
he was steeped in the splendors and sorrows of Jewish history. He was
also cosmopolitan, with the trace of a brogue from his native Belfast,
Northern Ireland, and an education gained largely in Britain.

As the chief delegate to the United Nations, Herzog led Israel's
defense against Arab attempts to oust it. In 1975, when the General
Assembly passed a resolution equating Zionism with racism, he went to
the rostrum and defiantly tore a copy of the resolution in two.
Seventeen years later, the Assembly repealed the resolution.

Herzog was in the Israeli Defense Force at his country's birth in
1948, rose to the rank of major general and served twice as director
of military intelligence, from 1948 to 1950 and from 1959 to 1962.

Then he retired, only to return as the West Bank's military governor
just after the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, in which Israel, in an
overwhelming victory, captured the West Bank and other territory from
neighboring Arab countries.

He also became noted, among Israelis, for radio commentaries he gave
on military subjects before and during that six-day war. He used the
radio to urge Israelis to stay in their air-raid shelters during
alerts, and in one widely quoted broadcast he told his listeners that
they were in much less danger where they were than was the attacking
Egyptian air force.

 

Herzog was first elected president by the Israeli Parliament, in 1983,
in a rebuff to Prime Minister Menachem Begin's governing coalition of
that day. By a vote of 61 to 57, with two blank ballots, Parliament
chose him over the government's candidate, Justice Menachem Elon of
the Supreme Court, to succeed President Yitzhak Navon of the Labor
Party.

In 1988, Herzog was elected by Parliament to a second term, the
maximum permitted by Israeli law. In that balloting, he was unopposed,
having the sponsorship of the Labor Party as well as wide backing from
the right-wing Likud bloc, Labor's partner in the coalition government
of the time.

He was succeeded on May 13, 1993, by Ezer Weizman, a former defense
minister and the nephew of Israel's first president, Chaim Weizman.
Ezer Weizman had been elected by Parliament on March 24, 1993.

As president, Herzog was sometimes acid in his criticisms of the
Israeli national voting system. In an interview in 1992, he said:
``The system we have is a catastrophe. It allows for fragmentation and
wheeling and dealing and gives inordinate power to small groupings.''

He was also something of a gadfly on a variety of other issues during
his presidency. He was one of the few prominent figures in Israeli
politics to comment regularly on Israel's high incidence of fatal
vehicular accidents. By late 1992, drivers had killed 20 times more
Israelis in the last five years than had the Palestinian uprising,
almost 2,300 people.

``If the enemy had slain us to this extent, the country would quake
and we would be shaking in our foundations,'' Herzog declared then in
a message for the Jewish New Year.

Earlier that year, at a time when Jewish settlers in the
Israeli-occupied territories had taken various measures in retaliation
for Arab acts of violence, he denounced vigilantism, saying in a radio
broadcast: ``The phenomenon of taking the law into one's hands, of
attacking innocents and interfering with the dedicated work of the
security forces, endangers our foundations and future.''

Later in the year, with Israel not able to integrate all the new
arrivals from the former Soviet republics fully into its economic
life, Herzog proposed setting up soup kitchens for immigrants, and was
criticized for doing so.

He also spurred controversy sometimes by his use of the presidential
power to pardon. In the mid-1980s, he was criticized for pardoning
agents of the Shin Bet security service and its chief, who was charged
with commanding that two Palestinian bus hijackers be summarily
executed.

In an interview in early 1993, Herzog noted that he had condemned
``what had happened.'' But he added that Israel was locked in combat
with terrorists, and that to take the security-service personnel ``and
put them on trial, and have each one bringing all sorts of evidence to
prove that he wasn't the worst and so on, could have torn the Shin Bet
to pieces just when we didn't need that.''

In addition, loud dissent arose after Herzog commuted the sentences of
members of what was called a Jewish underground organization that had
tried to kill local Palestinian functionaries.

He later contended that reducing the penalties against some of the
convicted members, and making them decry their deeds, had helped to
shatter their group.

As president, he traveled widely. He was among the world figures who,
along with survivors of the Holocaust, gathered in Washington in April
1993 to dedicate the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. There he
described his horror when he came upon Bergen-Belsen and other Nazi
death camps as a British officer.

``No one who saw those terrifying scenes,'' he said, ``will ever
forget.''

In 1992, to mark the 500th anniversary of the expulsion of the Jews
from Spain, Herzog went to Madrid and prayed together with Spain's
king, Juan Carlos, in a gesture symbolizing reconciliation between
their peoples.

But Herzog did not become reconciled with the nations that had
presented the 1975 U.N. resolution. In the 1993 interview, while still
president, he said:

``Of the three countries that presented the Zionism as racism
resolution, one has relations with us although no embassy—that's
Benin. Two still don't have relations—one which has relations with
nobody, namely Somalia, and one which is in great trouble, namely
Cuba. They were the three sponsors of that resolution, these bastions
of democracy and freedom.''

Herzog was born on Sept. 17, 1918, in Belfast, the son of Rabbi Isaac
Halevy Herzog, who was the chief rabbi of Ireland and later became the
first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of Israel, and the former Sarah Hillman.

The Herzog family emigrated to Palestine in the mid-1930s, and the
future president had three years of schooling at the Hebron Yeshiva
there. The educational institutions where he later studied included
Wesley College in Dublin, the Government of Palestine Law School in
Jerusalem, and London and Cambridge universities.

In the British army during World War II, he served with the Guards
Armored Division and in intelligence on the Continent. He was
discharged and then joined the Jewish underground in Palestine before
Israel was founded.

After his retirement from the military in 1962, he was for some years
a high executive of a conglomerate of industrial enterprises that Sir
Isaac Wolfson, a British businessman, owned in Israel.

Over the years he wrote, was a co-author of, or edited more than half
a dozen books, including ``The Arab-Israeli Wars'' (Random House and
Vintage, 1982), ``Heroes of Israel'' (Little, Brown, 1989) and
``Living History: A Memoir'' (Pantheon, 1996).

He is survived by his wife of 50 years, the former Aura Ambache; three
sons, Joel, Michael and Yitzhak, and a daughter, Ronit Bronsky. All
his children live in Israel except for Joel, who lives in Geneva.
Herzog is also survived by eight grandchildren.

In his memoirs, he wrote: ``I pray that my children and grandchildren
will see a strong and vigorous Israel at peace with its neighbors and
continuing to represent the traditions that have sustained our people
throughout the ages.''
Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Rabbi Yitzhak HaLevi HerzogRabbi Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog (1889–1959),
also known as Isaac Herzog, was the first Chief Rabbi of Ireland, his
term lasting from 1921 to 1936. From 1937 until his death, he was
Chief Rabbi of the British Mandate of Palestine and Israel, once
formed.

Rabbi Herzog was born in Lomza, Poland, and moved to the United
Kingdom with his family in 1898, where they settled in Leeds. His
initial schooling was largely at the instruction of his father, Joel
Leib Herzog, who was a rabbi in Leeds and then later in Paris.

After mastering Talmudic studies at a young age, Yitzhak went on to
attend the Sorbonne and then later the University of London, where he
received his doctorate. His thesis, which made him famous in the
Jewish world, concerned his re-discovery of Techelet, the type of blue
dye that is used for the making of Tzitzit.

Rabbi Herzog served as rabbi of Belfast from 1916 to 1919 and was
appointed rabbi of Dublin in 1919. He went on to serve as Chief Rabbi
of the Irish Free State between 1922 and 1936, when he immigrated to
Palestine to succeed Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook as Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi
upon his death.

Rabbi Herzog's son, General Chaim Herzog of the Israel Defense Forces,
was later to become president of Israel (and, incidentally, the only
president of Israel who was born in Ireland).

Works
Rabbi Herzog was recognised as a great rabbinical authority, and he
wrote many books and articles dealing with halachic problems
surrounding the Torah and the State of Israel. Indeed, his writings
helped shaped the attitude of the Religious Zionist Movement toward
the State of Israel. Rabbi Herzog authored:

Main Institutions of Jewish Law
Heichal Yitzchak
Techukah leYisrael al pi haTorah
Pesachim uKetavim
The Royal Purple and the Biblical Blue
Yitzhak Herzog
For his grandfather, see Rabbi Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog.
Yitzhak HerzogYitzhak (Buzi) Herzog (Hebrew: יצחק הרצוג)
(born:
September 22, 1960) is an Israeli politician and lawyer, and former
Minister of Housing and Building. He is currently second on the Labour
list. As of May 4, 2006, he is the Minister of Tourism.

The son of Israeli President Chaim Herzog and Aura Herzog, he was born
in Tel Aviv. He studied law in Tel Aviv University and Cornell. He is
known by his nickname Buzi [1]

In 1999, he was elected to the Knesset for Labour, and served as
government secretary in Ehud Barak's cabinet until 2001. In 1999, he
was also investigated in the 'Amutot Barak' scandal (a scandal
involving allegations that the party funding law was violated), but
maintained his silence. The Attorney General, therefore, decided to
close the case against him due to lack of evidence.

From 2000-2003, he served as chairman of the Israel Anti-Drug
Authority. He was elected to the Knesset in the 2003 election and was
appointed Minister of Housing and Building at his request in the
coalition government. In November 23, 2005, he resigned from his
cabinet post along with the rest of Labour. He was elected to the
Knesset in the 2006 election, and became Minister of Tourism in the
Kadima-led coalition government.

Herzog is chairman and whip of the Israeli-Australian Parliamentary
Association. He is also one of the few Knesset members who still
serves in the Military reserve (as a Major).

This entry is from Wikipedia, the leading user-contributed
encyclopedia.
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YICHUSAYNU
THE OFFICIAL NODA B'YEHUDA WEBSITE

http://maxpages.com/nodabyehuda/NOTEBOOK_with_your_messages
Date: 11/23/2000 10:41:49 AM
Name: Harold Rhode
Email Address: hrhode@erols.com
Homepage URL:
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/r/h/o/Harold-Rhode-MD/index.html
City: Potomac
State: MD
Country: United States
My Own Yichus: I am descended from Rabbi Shmuel Hillman of Metz,
through one of his sons. That means we are related.
Comments: I was looking at your site on the Noda' Be-Yehuda, and
cannot tell you how amazed I was at this. Kol HaKoved!

From family tree of the Jewish people;
1. Meir VINTSISKIR Died: Bauska?
Children:
2. Yitzhak Zvi (Iche POKEMPNER)
Children:
3. Chaya Shaina POKEMPNER Born: 1865. Married: 1890. Died: 1957
Spouse: Shmuel Yitzhak HILLMAN
Born: 2 Jul 1868, Shadova, Kovna Gub.
Married: 1890
Died: 11 Jun 1953, Jerusalem?, Israel- Children:
4. David HILLMAN
Born: 1894
Died: 1974

Spouse: Anne RABINOWITZ
Born: 1900, Edinburgh, Scotland
Married: 1923
Died: 1967, London, Uk Children:
5. Ellis HILLMAN Born: 1928, London, Uk. Died:
Jan 1996, London, Uk.
5. Harold HILLMAN, Living.
5. Mayer HILLMAN, Living.
4. Sarah HILLMAN
Born: 1898, Radvilishok Or P, Latvia
Died: Jan 1979, Jerusalem, Israel

Spouse: Yitzhak-Isaac Ha-Levi HERZOG
Born: 1888, Lomza, Poland
Died: 1959, Jerusalem, Israel Children:
5. Chaim HERZOG (6th president of Israel).
Spouse: Aura AMBACHE, Living Children:
6. Joel HERZOG, Living.
6. Mikhael HERZOG, Living.
6. Yitzhak HERZOG, Living.
6. Ronit HERZOG, Living.

 

5. Jacob David HERZOG Born: 11 Dec 1921,
Dublin, Ireland. Married: Abt 1951, Tel Aviv, Israel. Died: 8 Mar 1972
Spouse: Penina SHACHOR
Born: Tel Aviv, Israel
Married: Abt 1951, Tel Aviv, Israel Children:
6. Shira HERZOG, Living.
6. Eliezra HERZOG, Living.
6. Yitzhak HERZOG, Living.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Shmuel [Heilprin] HILLMAN
Born: Abt 1670, Krotoszyn, ( Near Poznan), Poland
Died: 30 Dec 1764, Metz, France Spouse: Sara ? Died: 27 Jun 1774, Metz,
France
Children:
1. Moshe HILLMAN Spouse: (D. Yehiel Mikhel) GLOGAU Children:
(D. Moshe) HILLMAN

2. Uri Faivush (Olry) HILLMAN Died: 22 Oct 1771, Metz, France.
Spouse: Chaya Jutleh ?

Children:
Hendleh (Hindkeh) HILLMAN Born: 25 Oct 1752, Metz, France. Married:
1770. Died: 3 Aug 1835.
Fratieh HILLMAN Born: 13 Nov 1753, Metz, France.
Juziel HILLMAN Born: 3 Jun 1755, Metz, France.
Salomon Leib HILLMAN Born: 23 Apr 1757, Metz, France Children: Shmuel
Yitzhak? HILLMAN Born: Abt 1780. Died: Bef 1868 Children:
Yehuda Leib HILLMAN Born: Abt 1805. Married: Abt 1829, Kovna Gubernia
?. Died: Bef 1871, Kovna Gub. ?.
Meir? HILLMAN Born: Abt 1805.
Shimkhel HILLMAN Born: Abt 1805. Died: Bef 1870.
Eliezer HILLMAN Born: Bef 1820.

Children:
Avraham Noah HILLMAN Born: Apr 1830, Linkova, Kovna Gub. . Married:
1855, Kelme, Kovna Gubernia ?. Died: 13 Feb 1903, Baltimore, Md.
Spouse: Devora SACHS
Born: May 1826, Kelme, Kovna Gubernia ?
Married: 1855, Kelme, Kovna Gubernia ?
Died: 11 Nov 1918, Baltimore, Md

Children:
Isadore Hyman HILLMAN Born: Abt 1853, Kelme? Or Linkov, Kovna Gub. .
Died: Kelme, Kovna Gub. ?. Spouse: Eva (Chaya) FRIEDMAN?
Born: 1856, Kelme, Kovna Gub. ?

Children:
Nathan HILLMAN Born: 1877, Kelme, Kovna Guberniia. Died: Johannesburg,
S. A. .
Meyer HILLMAN Born: 2 Jan 1879, Kelme, Kovna Gub. . Died: South Africa.
Max HILLMAN Born: 1880, Kelme, Kovna Guberniia. Married: Abt 1913,
Johannesburg, S. A. . Died: 8 Jul 1930, London, Uk.
Samuel HILLMAN Born: Abt 17 Jun 1881, Kelme, Kovna Gub. . Married: 10
Oct 1905, Baltimore, Md. Died: 29 Aug 1912, Elvator, Md.

Samuel HILLMAN Born: Abt 1855, Kelme, Kovna Gub. . Died: 14 Nov 1913,
Baltimore, Md?. Spouse: Yetta RACHWILL Died: 4 Aug 1934, Baltimore,
Md?

Children:
Sophie HILLMAN
Harry HILLMAN
Joseph HILLMAN
Alexander HILLMAN Born: 1884. Died: 1 Jun 1906, Baltimore, Md.
Ida HILLMAN Born: 1890, Nashville, Tn ( On Trip). Married: 21 Mar
1916, Baltimore, Md Or Washington, Dc. Died: 30 Nov 1970, Rockville,
Md.
Jack HILLMAN Born: 1895, Baltimore, Md ( Dairy Farm). Married: 16 Dec
1924, Chicago, Il. Died: 24 Jul 1960, Los Angeles, Ca.

 

C
Rebecca HILLMAN Born: Mar 1858, Kelem?, Kovna Gub. . Married: 1884,
Kovna Guberniia. Died: 4 Mar 1936, Baltimore, Md. Spouse: Isaac
(Veger) COPLIN
Born: Abt Sep 1855, Vegerei, Kovna Gub. ?
Married: 1884, Kovna Guberniia
Died: 23 Jul 1900, Baltimore, Md

Children:
Mary COPLIN Born: 1884. Married: Atlantic City, Nj?. Died: 1963, Miami,
Fl.
Emmanuel COPLIN Born: Feb 1885, Baltimore, Md. Married: 1912,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 1953, Philadelphia, Pa.
Charles COPLIN Born: 1887. Married: 1916, El Paso, Tx. Died: 1958.
Ida COPLIN Born: Dec 1887, Baltimore, Md. Died: Fl?.
Carrie COPLIN Born: 1892, Baltimore, Md. Died: 1975, Fl.
Sophia COPLIN Born: May 1894, Baltimore, Md. Died: 1977, West Palm
Beach, Fl.

 

Co
Jacob HILLMAN Born: 1860, Kelme, Kovna Gubernia ?. Children:
Carrie S. HILLMAN Born: 1892, Md. Married: Baltimore, Md. Died: 1975.
Irwin J. HILLMAN Born: 21 Aug 1893, Md. Died: 10 Dec 1972, Baltimore,
Md?.
Leon M. HILLMAN Born: 11 Oct 1896, Md. Died: 7 Jan 1970, Baltimore,
Md?.

Lena HILLMAN Born: 21 Nov 1869, Kelme, Kovna Gub. . Died: 18 Jun 1937,
Springfield Stat, Balt. , Md. Children:
Carrie S. HILLMAN Born: 1892, Md. Married: Baltimore, Md. Died: 1975.
Irwin J. HILLMAN Born: 21 Aug 1893, Md. Died: 10 Dec 1972, Baltimore,
Md?.
Leon M. HILLMAN Born: 11 Oct 1896, Md. Died: 7 Jan 1970, Baltimore,
Md?.

Louis HILLMAN Born: 1879, Bauska, Kurland Gub. Iia. Died: 3 Oct 1967,
Bridgeport, Co?. Spouse: Lena R. SACHS
Born: Jan 1878, Russia
Married: 1900, Baltimore, Md
Died: 2 Oct 1960, Baltimore, Md

Children:
Henry D. HILLMAN, Living.
Noah HILLMAN Born: 1904, Baltimore, Md. Died: 5 Oct 1977, Anapolis, Md.
Meyer HILLMAN Born: 1906, Md. Died: Bef 1982.
Leon Solomon HILLMAN Born: 26 Nov 1907, Baltimore, Md. Died: 12 Jan
1953, Baltimore, Md.

 

Spouse: Becky HERSKOWITZ
Born: 1887
Died: 27 Jul 1985, Bridgeport, Co?

Children:
Abraham HILLMAN
Samuel HILLMAN Died: 30 Mar 1988, Bridgeport, Co?.
Mary HILLMAN
Jack HILLMAN
Philip HILLMAN
Mae HILLMAN

 

Yeruham-Fishel HILLMAN Born: 1832, Linkuva, Kovna Gub. . Married: Bef
1860. Died: Aft 1896. Spouse: Leah ?
Born: 1837
Married: Bef 1860

Children:
Hannah HILLMAN Born: 18 Mar 1861, Pasvalys, Kovna Gub. . Married: Abt
1877, Kovna Gub. . Died: 30 Jun 1946, Cinncinati, Oh.
Abraham Abba HILLMAN Born: 1863, Linkuva, Kovna Gub. ?. Married: 11
Mar 1909, Norfolk, Va. Died: 26 Oct 1909, Portsmouth, Va.
Golda HILLMAN Born: 1870, Lygumon, Kovna Gub. .
Jennie HILLMAN Born: 1871, Kovna Gub. . Married: 24 Aug 1894,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 13 Jul 1947, Baltimore, Md.
Noach HILLMAN Born: 1872, Linkuva, Kovna Gub. ?.
Sora Feige HILLMAN Born: 1882, Lygumon, Kovna Gub?.

Israel HILLMAN Born: 1839, Linkuva, Kovna Gub. ?. Married: Abt 1857,
Kovna Gub. ?. Died: 6 Jun 1909, Baltimore, Md. Spouse: Sarah Leah
HILLMAN\TUCH\POT
Born: 1838, Kovna Gub. ?
Married: Abt 1857, Kovna Gub. ?
Died: 25 Aug 1893, Baltimore, Md

Children:
Isaac Noah HILLMAN Born: 1855, Bauska?, Kurland Gub. . Married: 1878,
Kurland ?. Died: 9 Jun 1925, Portsmouth, Va.
Nokhum Nosel HILLMAN Born: 1860.
Ite Rivke HILLMAN Born: 1863.
Hillel HILLMAN Born: 1866, Latvia Or Lithua.
Morris HILLMAN Born: 1869, Pademunki, Kovna Gub?. Married: 1893,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 27 Jun 1935, Philadelphia, Pa.
Jennie Rachel HILLMAN Born: Abt 1871, Kovna Gub. ?. Married: Abt 1894,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 20 Dec 1943, Baltimore, Md ( 9:30 Am).
Henry S. HILLMAN Born: 1871, Latv

Sheina HILLMAN Born: 1840.
Hyman FRIEDMAN Born: 1842, Kovna Gub. ?. Died: 6 Jun 1909, Baltimore,
Md.
Spouse: Fruma Esther ?

Children:
Morris FRIEDMAN Born: Abt 1871, Kupiskis?, Kovna Gub. . Married: Abt
1892, Baltimore, Md. Died: 23 Feb 1932, Baltimore, Md.
Philip FRIEDMAN Born: Abt 1872, Kupiskis?, Kovna Gub. . Died: 27 Oct
1937, Baltimore, Md.
Louis FRIEDMAN Born: Abt 1874, Kupiskis?, Kovna Gub. . Married: Abt
1902, Baltimore, Md. Died: 26 Sep 1936, Baltimore, Md.
Ida FRIEDMAN Born: 1879, Kupiskis?, Kovna Gub. . Died: 16 Jan 1944,
Baltimore, Md.
Abraham P. FRIEDMAN Born: 1886, Kupiskis, Lithuania ?. Died: 10 Jan
1947, Baltimore, Md.
Rebecca [Hillman] FRIEDMAN Born: Abt 1888, Kupiskis?, Kovna Gub. .
Married: 1909. Died: 16 May 1916, Baltimore, Md.

 

3. (D. Samuel) HILLMAN
4. Beila HILLMAN
5. Xxxxxx HILLMAN

Meir? HILLMAN
Born: Abt 1805

Children:
Sarah Leah HILLMAN\TUCH\POT Born: 1838, Kovna Gub. ?. Married: Abt
1857, Kovna Gub. ?. Died: 25 Aug 1893, Baltimore, Md. Spouse: Israel
HILLMAN
Born: 1839, Linkuva, Kovna Gub. ?
Married: Abt 1857, Kovna Gub. ?
Died: 6 Jun 1909, Baltimore, Md

Children:
Isaac Noah HILLMAN Born: 1855, Bauska?, Kurland Gub. . Married: 1878,
Kurland ?. Died: 9 Jun 1925, Portsmouth, Va. Spouse: Jennie Rachel
(Shaina TUCH
Born: 1857, Pasval, Kovna Gub. ?
Married: 1878, Kurland ?
Died: 4 Nov 1934, Portsmouth, Va

Children:
? HILLMAN
Asher Nathan HILLMAN Born: 8 Jul 1879, Pademonki, Kovna Gub. .
Married: 3 May 1934, Newport News, Va. Died: 9 Nov 1946, Portsmouth,
Va.
Benjamin HILLMAN Born: Feb 1884, Pademonki, Kovna Gub. . Married:
1909. Died: 28 Oct 1947, Portsmouth, Va.
Ida HILLMAN Born: Mar 1887, Panemunok, Kovna Gub. .
Louis Hyman HILLMAN Born: 19 May 1889, Pademonki, Kovna Gub. .
Sophie HILLMAN Born: Jul 1890, Pademonki, Kovna Gub. . Died: 28 Oct
1911, Portsmouth, Va.
Meyer HILLMAN Born: Jan 1900.
Lena Sarah HILLMAN Born: Aug 1900, Tampico, Va. Died: 1976, Portsmouth,
Va.

Nokhum Nosel HILLMAN Born: 1860.
Ite Rivke HILLMAN Born: 1863.
Hillel HILLMAN Born: 1866, Latvia Or Lithua.
Morris HILLMAN Born: 1869, Pademunki, Kovna Gub?. Married: 1893,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 27 Jun 1935, Philadelphia, Pa.
Jennie Rachel HILLMAN Born: Abt 1871, Kovna Gub. ?. Married: Abt 1894,
Baltimore, Md. Died: 20 Dec 1943, Baltimore, Md ( 9:30 Am).
Henry S. HILLMAN Born: 1871, Latvia Or Lithua. Died: 5 Feb 1933, Bizby,
Az

Shmuel Yitzchak Hillman
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

         
Rabbi Shmuel Yitzchak Hillman (July 2, 1868–June 1, 1953) was a renowned Orthodox Jewish Talmudic scholar, Posek and rabbi and served as a Dayan of the London Beth Din.
Rabbi Hillman was born in Kovno, Lithuania and in his youth studied Torah under his uncles, Rabbi Mordechai Hillman, Av Beth Din of Pasvatin, and Rabbi Noach Yaakov Hillman of Pasvalys. After his marriage, he studied intensively by himself in the house of his father-in-law, Rabbi Yitzchak Hirsch in the town of Franks in Kurland.
Rabbi Hillman received Semicha from the famous Rabbis Eliyahu Dovid Teumim (who was the head of the Beth Din in Ponevezh and afterwards in Jerusalem),Refael Shapiro of Volozhin, Meir Simcha HaKohen of Dvinsk and the Ridvaz of Slutsk.
In 1897, when Rabbi Hillman was 29 years old, he became Rabbi and head of the Beth Din of Berazino in the Minsk Region of then-Russia, an old and distinguished community that had been graced with many great rabbis in the past. In 1908, he was appointed Rabbi in Glasgow, serving and foundng theBeth Din there until 1914, when he was appointed a Dayan of the London Beth Din.
After retiring from the London Beth Din in 1934, Dayan Hillman settled in Jerusalem, devoting himself to study and writing. He co-founded the Jerusalem yeshiva Ohel Torah together with his son-in-law Chief Rabbi of Israel Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog, and served as its Rosh yeshiva.
Lineage[edit source | editbeta]
Rabbi Hillman was a descendant of his namesake Rabbi Shmuel Hillman (Helman), the Av Beth Din of Metz, who is mentioned in the introduction to theresponsa Noda BeYehuda. On his mother's side, he was a descendant of Rabbi Michal Datnover, who was known in his time as an exceptional scholar and Kabbalist.
In addition, Rabbi Hillman was a direct sixth-generation descendant of the author of Knesses Yechezkel, who was the Av Beth Din of Altona, Hamburg andWandsbek. He also descended from the Katzenellenbogen family, and could trace his lineage back to the Maharam (Rabbi Meir ben Isaac) of Padua and RabbiYehuda Mintz.
Death[edit source | editbeta]
Rabbi Hillman died in Jerusalem in 1953. Thousands of people followed his funeral through the streets of Jerusalem, among them Cabinet Ministers, Members of the Knesset, and leading rabbis and Rosh yeshivas. Dayan Hillman's death caused deep sorrow in Jerusalem, where he was greatly beloved.
Eulogies were delivered by the deceased's son-in-law Chief Rabbi Herzog, Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer (with whom Dayan Hillman learned with in the Volozhin yeshiva), the Minister of Religious Affairs Mr Moshe Shapiro, and others. He was survived by his wife; his daughter Sarah, the wife of Rabbi Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog; and his son David Hillman, a London artist.
Soon after Dayan Hillman died, a memorial service was held in London, where the Chief Rabbi Israel Brodie and Dayan Yehezkel Abramsky spoke, full of praise, respect and admiration for the deceased. Dayan Lazarus, Dayan Grunfeld, Dayan Grossnass and Rabbi Dr Isidore Epstein were among those in attendance.
Works[edit source | editbeta]
Dayan Hillman authored many scholarly works, including a 20-volume commentary on every tractate of the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds, as well as on the Mishnaic Orders Zeraim and Taharos and on the Rambam and Sifra, entitled Or Hayashar (London, Jerusalem). He also published novealle on the Tanachand a book of his sermons and orations.
Among the other writings of this outstanding figure were manuscripts on the Talmudic tractates Zevachim, Arakhin and Temura - all in the Order of Kodshim- and responsa on all four sections of the Shulchan Aruch.
Sources
• Jewish Chronicle archives
• Otzar HaPerushim (page 14)

Hillman