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I SHOULD LIKE TO ADD A POSTSCRPT TO MY TWO ENTRIES; THE WOMAN I SEEK WHO USED THE NAME OLGA SOMMERS/SMITKIN GAVE MY TWO BROTHERS AND I UP FOR ADOPTION. I SEEK THIS WOMAN IN THE HOPE I CAN FIND OUT OUR HISTORY AND HERITAGE AND ANY MEDICAL INFORMATION SHE CAN PROVIDE. I DO NOT WISH TO BOTHER ANYONE NOR INTRUDE ON ONES LIFE. BUT MY BROTHER IS VERY SICK AND I SHANT REST. TO THE WOMAN I SEEK OR ANYONE WHO KNOWS OF THIS, I PRAY THAT YOU WILL FEEL COMPASSION AND REALIZE THAT A LONG TIME HAS PASSED. TO THIS WOMAN, I THANK YOU FOR MY LIFE AND TRUST YOU WILL UNDERSTAND I NEED A BIT MORE. SO AGAIN I PLEAD, IF IN 1945 YOU GAVE UP A SET OF TWIN BOYS IN JERSEY CITY, AND AGAIN A BOY IN 1946, PLEASE FIND IT IN YOUR HEART TO CONTACT ME.
EDWARD, CHARLES, AND RONALD
donal elmogom@aol.com
nm USA -


VISHNIVE CEMETERY RENOVATION PROJECT


Dear Vishnive descendants, Shalom ,

List of Donors for the Vishnive Project

Zvi Abramson Israel
Rivka Belatruski Israel
Zane Buzby U.S.A
Ellen Bell-Gelt & Murray H. Gelt U.S.A
Ester Bogomilski Israel
Etta Eherlich Israel
Nathan & Galia Drori Israel
Lisa Dudman Israel
Matti Gal Israel
Dvora Rogovin Helberg & Uri Helberg Israel
Donna Goldberg U.S.A
Sima Lewin Israel
Eilat Gordin Levitan U.S.A
Rachel Miller Israel
Shimon Peres (Foreign Minister of Israel, Former Israeli Prime Minister )
Arlene Poglowitz U.S.A
Moshe Porat Israel
Geula Rabinowitz (Widow of Yehoshua Rabinowitz, of blessed memory, Former Israeli Finance Minister, Former Mayor of Tel Aviv)
Zvi & Judy Rogovin U.S.A
Fanni Sokolick Israel
Mina Steiner Israel
Beatrice Schuster Saphra U.S.A
Charles Straczynski U.S.A

This is only the beginning.
Your donation is requested. Any amount will be thankfully accepted.
Please join us .

The address for donations is :

Ms. Zane Buzby
3446 Troy Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90068
Tel: (323) 876-5566
cbmail@earthlink.net


Sincerely yours ,

Dvora & Uri Helberg
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I WANTED TO ADD THAT IF ANYBODY KNOWS ANY SMITKIN IN ISREAL OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I AM TRYING TO KEEP A PROMISE TO MY BROTHER WHO HAS CANCER. I WAS BORN IN 1946 HE 1945. PERHAPS SOMEONE KNOWS OF A SMITKIN-SOMMERS CONNECTION (SUMMERS) OR SMITH. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. EVEN THE HISTORY OF THE NAME MIGHT HELP. I WOULD APPRECIATE ANYTHING. PLEASE
Donal Elmogom@aol.com
nm USA -

I am trying to locate anybody who knows of the smitkins who resided in new york. Possible names; Jacob, Jennie, Minnie.
samuel..........This is very important. even if those names dont match. Please contact me
Thank you
Donal Elmogom@aol.com
nm USA -

Subj: Fw: Vishnive Project
Date: 1/20/02 10:01:28 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: helberg@netvision.net.il (helberg)
To: eilatgordn@aol.com (Eilat & Danni Levitan), cbmail@earthlink.net (Zane Buzby)

VISHNIVE CEMETERY RENOVATION PROJECT


Dear Vishnive descendants, Shalom ,

List of Donors for the Vishnive Project

Zvi Abramson Israel
Zane Buzby U.S.A
Ellen Bell-Gelt U.S.A
Ester Bogomilski Israel
Nathan & Galia Drori Israel
Lisa Dudman Israel
Matti Gal Israel
Dvora Rogovin Helberg & Uri Helberg Israel
Eilat Gordin Levitan U.S.A
Shimon Peres (Foreign Minister of Israel, Former Israeli Prime Minister )
Moshe Porat Israel
Geula Rabinowitz (Widow of Yehoshua Rabinowitz, of blessed memory, Former Israeli Finance Minister, Former Mayor of Tel Aviv)
Zvi & Judy Rogovin U.S.A
Mina Steiner Israel
Charles Straczynski U.S.A


This is only the beginning.
Your donation is requested. Any amount will be thankfully accepted.
Please join us.

The address for donations is :

Ms. Zane Buzby
3446 Troy Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90068
Tel: (323) 876-5566

Sincerely yours ,

Dvora & Uri Helberg
------------------------------------------
The shtetl Dolhinov also had a cemetery renovation project in 2001. More then a hundred natives and descendants of Dolhinov around the world gave donations
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_cemetary2001.html
pictures of the cemetery renovation project in Dolhinov
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Davidson, Isidore born; 25 Dec 1888 W in Vishnevo, Russia. was in the U. S in 1917
.
USA -

Harry RABINOWITZ
[948]
1894 - 1961
BIRTH: 1894, Vishnevo, Vilna, Russia
DEATH: 1961, New York
Family 1 : Ida JERUSALEM
Edward RABSON
Roslyn RABINOWITZ
.
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BELARUSIAN STATE ARCHIVES-MUSEUM OF LITERATURE AND ARTS

Address: 4?, Kirilla and Mefodiya St., Minsk, 220030, Republic of Belarus
Tel: (375-17) 227-47-81, 227-25-83, 227-11-88

Director: Anna V. Zapartyko

Previous names:
State Archives of Literature and Arts (1960-1976),
Central Archives-Museum of Literature and Arts of Belarus (1976-1993)

Amount of holdings: 407 fonds (310 of which are personal collections of prominent figures of literature and arts), 77,961 items

Chronological period: from 1820 to the present

Brief holdings description: The automated retrieval systems "Name index" and "Personal archives " are working in the archives.

For researches of cultural and national renaissance and liberation movement in Belarus of the end of the 19th-the beginning of the 20th century, the following fonds and collections are of the greatest interest:

the collection of documents of the manuscripts' department of the Belarusian Museum named after I. Lutskevich in Vilno (1835-1943), which contains materials of the Belarusian Association on rendering help to the victims of the war; Belarusian Socialist Gramada; Belarusian Party of socialist-revolutionaries; Belarusian Social-Democratic party; the documents of the Belarusian People's Republic, Ministry of Belarusian affairs under the Lithuanian government; materials of the Central Belarusian Council of Vilno and Grodno regions, Belarusian Army Committee, Youth League "Belarusian falcon" in Prague;
materials of the Belarusian cultural and educational organizations (Belarusian Scientific Association, etc.), publishing house ("Zaglyane sontsa i u nasha vacontsa"), journals ("Belarusky Letapis", "Kryvich", "Malanka", "Sakha"), newspapers ("Belarusky zvon", "Goman", "Nasha Niva", etc.);
personal documents of L. Dubeikovsky, K. Duzh-Dushevsky, P. Zhavrid, V. Lastowsky, I. and A. Lutskevich, A. Smolich, A. Stankevich, B. Tarashkevich, A. Tsvikevich, etc.;
the collection of photos on the history of Belarusian cultural and political movement, collected by Y.Shnarkevich (1910-1940);
documentary collection of the critic and literary scholar L.A. Bende (1953-1960). It contains creative and personal materials of the Belarusian poets, writers, scientists, who were subjected to repression;
documents of Belarusian republican department of the All-Union Administration on copyright protection (1917-1935);
documents of All-Belarusian association of poets and writers "Maladnyak" (1924-1927);
collection of materials of the Bogdanoviches family (1883-1975);
private collections of the writer Z. Veras (1908-1969), the musical critic, publicist and translator Y.N. Dreizin (1879-1942), the writer and public figure Y.L. Dyla (1899-1961), the memorialist P.V. Myadzielka (1913-1973).
Belarusian modern culture is reflected in private collections of the most prominent figures of literature and arts: the writers – A. Adamovich, V. Bykov, Y. Kolas, Y. Kupala, V. Korotkevich, I. Melezh, M. Tank, I.Shamyakin, etc.; the actors and film directors – L. Alexandrovskaya, A. Kistov, A. Klimova, P. Molchanov, E. Mirovich, B. Platonov, S. Stanyuta, V. Vladomirsky, etc; the composers – A. Bogatyrev, G. Vagner, E. Glebov, I. Tykotsky, A. Turenkov, N. Churkin; the ethnomusicologist L. Mukharinskaya, etc; the painters and sculptors – A. Kashkurevich, A. Mariks, M. Tychyna.

For researchers interested in the history of the jewish culture in Belarus in the 20th century, the interesting information is contained in the following fonds and collections:
the fonds of the Belarusian State Jewish Theatre (1924, 1941-1949);
private collections of the actors K. Kulakov (Rutshtein), Yu. Aronchik and M. Moin; the film directors L. Litvinov and M. Rafalsky; the writers L. Katsovich, M. Kulbak, I. Platner, G. Reles and L. Shapira; the art critic S. Palees, etc.

The subject "Belarusian emigration" is exemplified in collections of the writer M. Sednev (1934-1992), the singers M. Zabeida-Sumitsky (1892-1990) and Danchik (B. Andrusishyn, 1958), the writer and public figure S. Yanovich (1944-1994).

A peculiar interest will be evoked by the Bernard Show's photos collection (1929-1930), most of which are the original ones.

The collection of ethnographer and historian A.K. Elsky (1839-1885), and the collection of I.I. and N.I. Grigoroviches (the 14th-19th centuries) can be useful for researchers of Russian social, scientific and religious life of the19th century.
http://www.president.gov.by/gosarchives/EArh/E_lit_isk.htm


click here for the site
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Today I called Shalom Norman in Israel. He told me that every year he attends the memorial meetings for the Jews who perished in Vileyka. The meetings are held during Purim since most of the residents of Vileyka and other Jews who worked there from near by shtetls, were killed during Purim of 1942. In 2002 the meeting will be held on the 28 of February.
Most of Shaloms' family was able to escape from Vileyka by train to Russia during the first days of the German occupation. Shalom thinks that hundreds of people from Vileyka were able to escape by trains, and most of the towns’ Jews survived.
From reading the Yizkor books of other communities in the area and talking to people I know that it is not so in other communities. At the most about 10% of the Jews survived and very few of them were able to escape during the first days. Most who tried were turned back when they reached the old Polish-Russian border. Many did not try because they had no idea of the coming horrors.
In 1939 when the Russian invaded they sent people to Siberia but did not kill any.
So most people in other communities were then under the impression that only the communist Jews would be in danger from the Germans and others, especially women and children would be safe.

Later I called Reuven Norman in Israel. Reuven was about sixteen in 1941. I asked him if he knew if most of the Jews of Vileyka were saved. He said that hundreds escaped by taking trains and others (like him) later on, but more Jews from Vileyka perished then escaped. He said that he would try to find the numbers. He told me that hundreds escaped because Vileyka had a train station and two trains were able to go deep in to Russia during the first days of the occupation by Germany. I asked Reuven why his family did not try to escape. He told me that his father was a guard at the palace in St. Petersburg in 1914. At the start of World War I he was sent to the front and was captured by the Germans. He was a P.O.W for four years and felt that the Germans treated him very fairly during that time. He truly disliked the communists- and said "The Germans are very civilized people as far as my experience goes- why would they be different now?"
The family did not question his decision. At that time the father ruled.
A few weeks later, some time in July of 1941 he immediately volunteered to work when the Germans gave an order to all the Jewish man to come.
With another about fifty Jewish men from Vileyka he was a taken to work. All day they dug holes in the ground and at the end of the day they were shot and fell in the holes they dug. Some local Christians, who watched it, later told their families about it.
Reuven told me that he was hiding in Kurenets with his grandfather’s family during the first months of the war.
His mother was the daughter of Meir Aharon Alperovitz of Kurenitz. She was a sister to Yermiyau, herzel, Shlomo and Feyga Michla Shmukler. Meir Aharon had a sister who married an Eidelman in Krivichi and had a son Michael who now lives in Florida. Yermiyahu and Hertzel Alperovitz died in the Vileyka camp. Both were very helpful to the other people in the camp and hertzel was one of the organizers of the escape. Hertzels’ wife Leyka survived the escape, Her sister Liba was killed and her husband Mordechai and the two children survived. After the war Leyka married Mordechai Alperowitz (the father of Yeoash). The youngest brother Shlomo was a prisoner of war since 1939. (He was in the Polish army). The family received letters from him for two years until the Germans started the war with Russia. They do not know where he perished.

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from; http://www.angelfire.com/ms2/belaroots/foster2.htm#rawicz
MINSK, WITHIN THE PALE OF THE JEWISH SETTLEMENT
From the report of Commissioners Weber and Kempster, August 30, 1891.
The information was extracted from a report commissioned by Charles Foster, U.S. Treasury Secretary, in 1891. At the time, U.S. immigration was administered by the Treasury Department. The purpose of the Commission was to determine "the principal causes that incite emigration to the United States", as well as whether current immigration laws were being followed or abused by the steamship companies and others. The Commission members, separately and together, spent months traveling throughout Europe and Russia, within the Pale of Settlement and outside it. With the assistance of virtually every U.S. Consul in Europe, the commission members had little trouble accumulating the information they wanted and interviewing whomever they wished. To their credit, they not only met with the major players, steamship executives, immigrant aid groups, etc., but also spent considerable time interviewing ordinary Jews. Their (fully indexed) report runs hundreds of pages, containing observations and an eclectic mix of raw research. The report provides insight on the mechanics of Jewish emigration from Russia, as well as laws regarding Jews. Among the material included is:

Various transcriptions of passport documents, steamship circulars and regulations, and interview notes
laws of various countries, primarily those regarding immigration/emigration and steamship operation
Source: House of Representatives Executive Document No. 235, 52nd Congress, 1st Session, Serial Set 2957


... We then visited a quarter of the city where the Jews congregate for the purpose of obtaining employment, a sort of market square. There were hundreds of men, women, and children of all ages and in every condition of poverty and wretchedness; young, stalwart fellows, and people bent with age, all anxious and many grouped and in earnest and anxious conversation. Some were in rooms with doors open, and as the houses are built close to the very narrow walks, the whole interior could be plainly seen. It was toward the close of the day, and we could see the evening meal spread upon the tables, consisting generally of black rye bread and water. Most of these were people who had formerly lived in the interior and had been driven into the Pale. The important question with them is how to obtain even this bitter, black bread, which constitutes their main sustenance. Many of them were brought here by étapé, and therefore had no clothing except that which they carried on their backs, and most of them without money to buy clothing. Most of the children had but a single garment, and all of them were in a condition of depression and apparent homelessness. There was an entire absence of intoxication, and we may say here that the Jew is singularly free from this vice; not a single case of intoxication among Jews was noticed anywhere in Russia. Conversation with some of them disclosed the fact that the principal questions discussed are "What shall we do, and where shall we go to get bread?" for anticipation of the terrors of approaching winter and the certainty of starvation, which they see no means of averting, aggravate the present misery. Willing and able to work, they are unable to obtain it; forbidden to work outside the city, forbidden to trade in the country, unable to leave the precincts where they now are, excluded from governmental work, it is no wonder they wish to fly somewhere where they can breathe and have an equal chance in the struggle for existence. The only thing which prevents them from going en masse to other countries is their poverty.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sworn testimony taken before the Select Committee on Emigration and Immigration (foreigners); House of Commons. Exhibit A. I. Extract, page 117
Examination of HERMANN LANDAU, member of the Jewish board of guardians, vice-president of the Poor Jew's Temporary Shelter; and one who takes a general interest in the welfare of poor Jewish inhabitants of London.

Q: Does not the arrival of these poor foreigners (meaning Hebrews) tend to overcrowd the labor market and make it more difficult for those who are living in the east-end of London to get full employment?
A: In my opinion it does not affect the trade at all, or to a very slight extent at all events.

Q: But if there is such a difficulty in getting full employment one would conclude that the greater number that come into London from abroad would make it more difficult to get full employment?
A: I do not think so, because the people that are here already do not and can not get full employment, and a great many of those are sent to America for the purpose of bettering themselves.

Q: Do you mean that they are sent after they have been some time in this country?
A: Yes; the board of guardians send a good many families away to America.

Q: After being two or three years in England?
A: Yes, and longer.

Q: Is there no objection made in America to receiving them?
A: No; it is only this morning that I have received the report of the United Hebrew Charities of New York, in which I find that they do not complain on that score, and there seems to be no difficulty, because they say: "We should be wanting in our duty were we to omit to state the difficulties we encounter through the immigration of persons incapable of work." Then they say: "With all the sympathy for their position, we can not find the means to permanently help these helpless people in a community that has no care for thousands of impoverished, aged, and weakly persons. People unable to work should be warned against immigration which must result in bitter disappointment in a foreign land, and in most cases making their position worse instead of better from a material point of view." But they never complain of people who are able to work.

Q: Is it correct to say that the majority of the moneyed class have from 2 to 3 in their pockets?
A: Yes.

Q: You do not suppose that that is sufficient to carry a man to America and maintain him there until he gets work?
A: No. They originally start with an amount sufficient to carry them on to their destination.

Q: What do you call that amount?
A: Six or seven pounds; but they first of all have to run the gauntlet of the frontier guard in Russia. A man is obliged to have a particular passport and he is not allowed to leave the country without it. It has happened that sometimes there is a very good-natured (as I might call him) frontier guard who will accept a rouble for the privilege of letting him go, whereas another will insist upon receiving twenty roubles, and of course, if you take twenty roubles out of fifty it makes a very large hole in it.

Q: Still you do not mean to tell the committee that men with 3 in their pockets are in a position to go on to America and make their way there?
A: When they start for America they generally have a letter from America, from relatives or friends inviting them to come.

Q: And they are provided for when they get there?
A: Yes.

Q: You have brought the report of the Shelter; will you kindly read the first few lines in the "Constitution of the Poor Jew's Temporary Shelter" for 1875-76 and tell me whether you agree with it or not?
A: I have not brought that with me.

Q: I will read it to you and ask you in connection with the Shelter, whether you agree with it: "The influx of homeless and helpless foreign Jews, driven by force of circumstances to seek a livelihood in England, being sadly on the increase and unduly pressing on their struggling brethren already here, this society is formed with a view to prevent newcomers from either being driven to the mission house or lapsing into pauperism and becoming a burden upon the community;" do you agree with that?
A: Yes; but I wish to qualify this, with your permission. I think we all know that charities are allowed a certain amount of exaggeration, by which they appeal to the charitable. We know that the hospitals generally appeal for funds and say that they are in a bankrupt state, and so we have to appeal to charity. We could not enter into all the details of the work done in the institution for the purpose of relieving England of a large number of people who would otherwise stay here, and so we put it on the ground of charity in order to get some funds.

Q: What is the meaning of this passage in speaking of the Shelter? You are asked "What is the exact object of the Shelter for the immigrants to this country?" and you answered "To forward them and protect them in this way: We have often a Belgian, or a German, or a Hungarian, or an Austrian coming to the Shelter for a similar position, but those we send either to the consulate or certain charitable societies of those countries, and in almost all cases, excepting where a man is known to be an impostor (and there are some, though very few), they are taken in hand and dispatched by those societies either to their homes or to some destination whither they are anxious to go." You are the medium, then, between the immigrants and those various charitable societies?
A: Yes.

Q: And those societies you mention in the conclusion of your answer do practically the work of sending them either back to their own country, or forward them to the United States?
A: Yes; exactly so.

click to read more
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Shimon Says
Introduction and Compilation
by Roger A. Gerber and Rael Jean Isaac
Roger A. Gerber, an attorney and consultant, serves on several boards, including the Middle East Forum's New York Advisory Board. Rael Jean Isaac is the author of Israel Divided (Johns Hopkins University Press) and Parties and Politics of Israel (Longman).

Shimon Peres (né Persky) was born in Vishneva, Poland in 1923, and emigrated with his family in 1934 to Palestine, where he graduated from the Ben-Shemen agricultural youth village. During the past half century, Peres has been at the center of Israeli Labor Party politics and also served in a wide range of government and party posts. He was director-general of the Defense Ministry during 1953-59, and has been a member of the Knesset since 1959, during which period he has held many ministerial, subministerial, and party positions. He has been prime minister of Israel and leader of the Labor Party since the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin in November 1995. He served for many years as vice president of the Socialist International (which he describes as "probably the most important nongovernmental political organization in Europe, if not in the world").1

Peres views himself as a visionary (he has stated, "I got a license to become a dreamer")2 and is someone who speaks him mind openly. In view of his central position in Israeli political life, and in the Oslo process especially, we offer a sampling of some characteristically idiosyncratic utterances in recent years.

PEACE PROCESS

This is not a negotiation of give and take because Israel has something to give but has nothing to take.3

I don't think we should judge the process by the performance of Yasir Arafat. We're not negotiating with Yasir Arafat. We're negotiating with ourselves.4

Papers are papers and realities are realities. We cannot judge the PLO and its leader just by what he is saying. Would we do so, we would be completely wrong and we would be in troubles.5

[Responding to an interviewer who asked "Are you saying that what Arafat told you in Oslo is sufficient, that he does not have to sign any new commitments?"] I am not a notary who writes affidavits.6

[Asked about Arab statements that there would be no peace without an Arab Jerusalem]: These are only words. Let them talk.7

[Reacting to an Arab song, "Zionist, your death is in my hands"]: There are those who sing and those who shoot. I'm checking out those who shoot.8

THE NEW MIDDLE EAST

We are going to copy a European example which is called Benelux. I hope the relations between the Jordanians, the Palestinians, and us will be very much of the same nature that exists in Benelux.9

A Middle East where holiness will overcome oiliness . . .10

[In Gaza] a dynamic reconstruction has started. . . . Women are throwing away their veils and are going swimming in the sea.11

STRATEGY

I have always tended to be overly optimistic.12

An army that can occupy knowledge has yet to be built. And that is why armies of occupation are passé.13

It is no wonder that war, as a matter of conducting human affairs, is in its death throes and that the time has come to bury it.14

Anyone who wants peace and security will get neither.15

It was a mistake to bomb the nuclear reactor in Iraq.16

Between ten bunkers and ten hotels, ten hotels are also defense.17

ECONOMICS

We claim that the United States and Europe became so productive that the only thing you can really produce is unemployment. The more productive you are becoming, the more unemployed people you are having. The time has come to export your unemployment.18

In technology, we have an advantage over the former Soviet Union, because our technology is more advanced. We have an advantage over the United States, because our prices are less capitalistic.19

DEMOCRACY

As a protégé of David Ben-Gurion, I subscribe to his philosophy that "I may not know what the people want; I do know what is good for the people."20

ZIONISM

We are discovering that all the things we are fighting for are not so important.21

The more we give up land, we discover we have more Ph.D.s per kilometer -- so we are going to make a living on the Ph.D.s and not on the mileage.22

We live in a world where markets are more important than countries.23

POLITICS

[To those who disagree with his vision]: It's a changed world and . . . you are out of date.24

[In the Knesset, to Benjamin Netanyahu]: You were in America and you are still in a daze. You have just come back and, believe you me, you have not got a clue what we are talking about.25

THE FUTURE

We are in transition from a world of identifiable enemies to one of unidentifiable problems.26

What we have to do is to economize our policies, and not to politicize our economies, which is so costly and so expensive. Dictatorship, nowadays, is so expensive that only rich countries can afford it. Poor countries can hardly suffer it -- with an outsized secret service, the censorship, the permanent control, the worries, the suspicion, the narrowness, the closeness, the ignorance.27

I have become totally tired of history, because I feel history is a long misunderstanding.28

SHIMON PERES

I feel in some ways the most independent political figure in Israel. Nobody can add to what I have done, and nobody can take away from what I did.29

[Describing his courtship]: Her name was Sonia, and she was eventually to become my wife. I sought to impress her by reading to her, sometimes by the light of the moon, selected passages from Marx's Das Kapital.30



1 Shimon Peres, Battling for Peace (New York: Random House, 1995), p. 170.
2 Pennsylvania Gazette, Nov. 1994.
3 Statement before the 50th Session of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, Geneva, Feb. 10, 1994.
4 Jewish Week (New York), June 2, 1994.
5 Heritage (Los Angeles), June 3, 1994.
6 Israel Radio, May 23, 1994.
7 Speech in New York City, May 23, 1994.
8 The Jerusalem Post International Edition, Feb. 3, 1996.
9 Address to Council of the Socialist International, Oct. 6, 1993.
10 Remarks to Fourth Business Forum Conference, Jerusalem, Feb. 28, 1994.
11 Die Welt, July 14, 1995.
12 Shimon Peres, The New Middle East (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1993), p. 18.
13 Remarks on acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize, Oslo, Dec. 10, 1994.
14 Ibid.
15 The Jerusalem Post, May 7, 1995.
16 Ha'aretz, Dec. 24, 1995.
17 Ha'aretz, Jan. 29, 1996.
18 Speech to The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, Feb. 2, 1994.
19 Remarks before the Knesset Economic Committee on the Arab Boycott, Feb. 21, 1994.
20 The Jerusalem Post International Edition, Dec. 23, 1995.
21 Jewish Week, June 2, 1994.
22 Pennsylvania Gazette, Nov. 1994.
23 Ibid.
24 Speech in New York City, May 23, 1994.
25 IBA television, Jerusalem, Aug. 30, 1995.
26 The New Middle East, p. 82.
27 Remarks to Fourth Business Forum Conference, Jerusalem, Feb. 28, 1994.
28 The Wall Street Journal, Sept. 30, 1994.
29 The Jerusalem Post International Edition, July 16, 1994.
30 Battling for Peace, p. 25.


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Dear Mrs Helberg,
I do have some pictures from the time of the war, but they were given to me by the Germans that ran the station and mostly they are of them and around the train station in Bogdanowo where we lived.

In regards to during the war and after the war pictures; that was not possible for us to take since we did not have our camera which got lost with the baggage on the way to the ship at the start of the war through the end.
Not only did we not have a camera, we had no clock,
radio or calender. We got up when the rooster crowed and went to bed when it got dark. We told time by the sun and when you marked the
shadow of your head against a stone and if it took one step that was
noon.

Regarding the Jewish cemetery; you asked me if it had trees or a
fence.
Regarding the trees, if you traveled from Minsk to Wiszniewo, which you
did, you saw for yourself that there were nothing but trees in the villages
and all over.
If there was a fence or trees at the Jewish cemetery; I don't remember
what the enclosures were. it could have been a small stone wall because it was
easy to get into it. or it could have been a fence. My interest in the Jewish cemetery was mostly that it was different from the three catholic cemetery's in the area. It was a lot neater than the others and what mystified me were the grave stones. Which some looked like mini crypts which I couldn't figure out if the person was
buried in the ground or folded over and stuck into it. I remember it was red in
color. it could have been made out of brick.

Then there were long flat slabs as well as regular grave stones. I prowled
around all of the cemetery's in the area including the one which members
of my family was buried. I had nothing else to do. The scenery was not
important to me. it was 56 years ago that I left there and it's really hard to
remember after so many years.

What I do remember and it's stuck in my mind and will be there for ever
of people being butchered at the cemetery while I watched it from the
ww1 German bunker across from the cemetery. There was no machine gun
on top of the bunker, only wide eyed me.
As I sent Eilat my manuscript that was written in 1949. there was no Internet,
No Wisniewo Sight on the Internet and the reason for the manuscript was
that I was afraid that,what happened in such a small town like Wiszniewo
would be forgotten and no one would know what went on. I felt that no one
cared and any way that was written for my children so they would know what type
life their father(me) went through. I wrote what I saw from that bunker
and that was it.
Thank God for people like your cousin Eilat Levitan and you that Wisniewo
was not forgotten after all and will be remembered forever.

I am glad you met the priest in Wiszniewo. Did you meet him at the
rectory by the church or his home on Krave St.? He sure let's loose with the
vodka.
He is afraid to live at the rectory because of bandits.

It was nice hearing from you, I would have answered sooner but I had to
take care of my customers. At my age, sometimes it get's hard to do.

Sincerely

Charles Straczynski


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Nancy Holdan wrote;
My Svir website is up. It is just for a preview until I get more
information.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Svir
nholden@interserv.com
I am pasting here some information from the site;
Our Small Town - Swir

Extracts from a book from the Yivo Institute in New York written in Yiddish. The extracts (ca. 8 pages on the description and history of the town Swir) were sent to Belarus SIG by Arnold H. Wolfe, who had them translated into English by a friend.

The town of Swir, where we saw for the first time in our lives the rays of the sun: the town that first heard our childish delight; the town where our first tears dropped: the town in which we played and joked throughout our childhood; this was the town that became a part of ourselves like our own flesh and blood.

A long street with two squares and a few small alleys actually made up the whole of Swir, and despite the description it was, in our eyes, the children of Swir, nicer than any other town. Truthfully speaking there were no brick houses in Swir. It was only one side wall and all the other parts of the house were built of wood. The roofs were covered either with shingles, metal or plain straw. Throughout our lifetime many houses grew old. There were houses which were practically sunken in the earth up to the windows. Some homes did not even have wooden floors.

It was a rarity to have plumbing in the town of Swir. Most of the water was derived from a well quite far away, and yet it seemed a wonder that no one hated this place. On the contrary, everyone was tied to this town with their very lives.

Anywhere a person of Swir was to be found, be it in New York or Los Angeles, in Buenes Aires or in Cuba, in Paris or in Brazil, in London or Tel-Aviv, in that place the one same heart was beating. All of them are bound like brothers and sisters, their lives like one, and all this because of the forlorn little town in a section of Vilna.

The town was very friendly. Even the nature around us was a witness that our grandparents knew where to build their homes. From one side a stream, and from the other side a lake, and the stream actually flows out of the lake near the houses of the town. Around and around were forests, fields and small towns. The town was not dipped in milk and honey, rather in green fields and flowers and as far as the eye could see were various fruit trees. There were apple and pear trees, plum and cherry trees, and blueberries without end.

During the summer the town was surrounded by ears of corn and stalks of wheat. In the winter is was covered with a big white blanket of snow. The Jews of Swir , therefore, lived a very contented life. In the old huts there lived good people and devoted friends. Everyone felt secure in their homes, like a bird in its nest, that is, until the wild barber came and the nest together with is birds was broken and destroyed. Woe! Woe unto the faithful and devoted birds of Swir! Woe! Woe unto their burned and destroyed nest.

Highlights of the History of Swir
Unfortunately, a lot of historical material and documentation is missing, thus making it difficult to relate the exact history of Swir. Not only was our whole city destroyed, but also our cultural and social life was uprooted. We were physically uprooted from our very origin, as well as geographically lost. The sources for further basic knowledge are lost to us today. Unfortunately, the generation that could have enriched us with its knowledge has perished. Yet we made an effort to relate the history of this town in a concise form.

It is clear that the town carries the name of the great Duke Swerski. His dynasty ruled for hundreds of years over all the surrounding areas. It is also said that on the peak of the mountain there stood a beautiful castle. In his honor not only was the town named after him, but also tens of families named themselves after the great Duke. It was extremely difficult for us to confirm with certainty if the families today named Swirski spread throughout the world originated from Swir.

According to all estimations the Jewish community was is existence for hundreds of years. The old cemetery can be a witness to this as most graves are sunken in the earth. The few monuments whose engraving was still legible dated back one hundred and fifty years. The ledger that had all the deaths recorded on it, and their place of burial was passed from one generation to the next, and was an important historical document.

Most Jews of the town wandered in from surrounding towns or close cities. It is difficult to know today whether they came of ther own free will or because of the decree from the Czarist regime that Jews must leave the towns. Therefore, many families who were forced to leave carried the name of their town. The Fuzileher, Shpialer, Dubnikirer according to the origin of their town, for example, the Kurgatkes originated from the town of Kureniaz, Miadler and Shuentzianer. The big fire that broke out at the end of the century practically wiped out the city. Therefore there are no old historical buildings or antiques left. The synagogue was rebuilt after the fire in a modern style.

The town endured many wars. Napoleon and his army reached there. There is a legend that the Swirer hills thinned out through him. Through the First World War the town practically remained unharmed because the fighting front was further away by several kilometers. Later however, by the Polish-Bolshevik War in 1920 there was a battle before the town was captured.

The stronghold of the Polish Army was on the hill of Swir, while the yet stronger Bolshevik Red Army was located at the other side of the river. During the fierce battle between the two armies which heavily destroyed many homes, the Jews escaped to the cemetery. The cemetery was in close proximity to the city. The day after the surrender of the Polish Army the Jews returned to their homes.

They later found out that it was a coincidence that they were saved because they all hid behind the trees of the cemetery. The Russian Army saw that there were large groups of people hiding there and mistook them for the Polish. They were prepared to fire with their artillery when they heard the cry of a child and the sound of animals. They realized then that they were only civilians. In that war an eleven year old boy was wounded. He was Velvel, the son of the Chassid.

The people who remained alive claimed that after the Second World War the greatest majority of the town was destroyed. The synagogue became level with the earth. The whole area was virtually uprooted. The Christian neighbors made the area into gardens. No vestige of Jewish life, as it was, remained. Most tragic of all, was that from approximately 200 families who lived there, remained only 100 survivors. These people were scattered all over the world, but the majority of them are in Israel.

Geographical and Economic Situation
Even from a distance of 5 to 6 kilometers the contours of the town are visible in the blue sky and extend long and narrow. Especially visible is the hill, the Swir Everest in the middle of the market place, and the Swirer skyscraper the Yedes wall.

The German occupation of the First World War extended the railroad to Constantine.

Swir is geographically located in west White Russia. The neighboring towns and distances are as follows:

Kabilnik - 20 Kilometers
Michlisbak - 21 Kilometers
Sventzion - 37 Kilometers
Kurenetz - 49 Kilometers
Smargon - 42 Kilometers
Aside from the fact that the town was above sea level and the paths were cemented, it was still very muddy on rainy days.

In back of the town there were lots of mud puddles. The farmers used to go to town through the mud as a short cut. In a dry summer they picked up their pants to their knees and splashed through the mud. During the fall and Spring it was impossible to pass through the mud.

On the other side of town the ground was normal.

There were 1900 people in the town of Swir - 1100 Jews and 800 non Jews. Among the gentiles there were White Russians and Poles. It was difficult to differentiate who belonged to which nationality, because many rich people found it below their dignity to admit they belonged to the White Russian nationality. They broke their teeth in order to speak like Poles and claimed they belonged to the Polish nationality. They let these people have their way, in letting them think they were Polish.

The Jews lived in "The Street of the Third of May", which starts at the cloister and goes till the horse market, a length of about one kilometer. That marked the boundaries of the town. Many Jews also lived in smaller streets.

The people called Staravieren and tens of families built a village at the side of the river and called Sloboda.

Most of the Jewish people in Swir were merchants. In front of every house on the main street where goods were sold, there were many different types of stands. There were textile, dry goods, hardware, building materials, bakeries, butcher and other stands as well. For many people these stands were not their only means of sustenance. In many families it was the job of the wives and daughters to take care of these stands.

The men were the dealers, and dealt in many different trades. Some dealt with wheat in large scale production. They used to purchase the wheat at the market and exported large quantities to Vilna. Another dealt in the same manner with potatoes, with fruit, with poultry, with eggs, with leather skins, with pig hair and many others. There were many merchants who were occupied only during certain seasons of the year, like fruit gardeners. Besides this, there were many peddlers, and those who worked with their hands like shoemakers and tailors. The Jews of Swir received the main financial help from the bank and the town's Jewish Charity Organization. According to a report from Vilna, there were a total of 140 members who belonged to the Jewish Charity Organization.

The greatest majority of the Jewish congregation lived very modestly, and yet they were very satisfied and happy. Unfortunately, when the Second World War broke out this contented life was utterly destroyed.


for beautiful moving pictures of Svir click here;
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Rachel and Reuven Rogovin were born in Volozhin, Rachel in 1906, Reuven in 1904. Their days of youth, falling in love, getting married and having babies all took place in Volozhin.(near Vishnevo) They were successful in their escape in July of 1941 from the area that just passed to Nazi hands. They escaped with their two young children passed the Russian border to faraway Tadzhikistan. At the end of the war the family came to Riga, from where they went to Israel in the early fifties. Reuven Rogovin was devoted to the memory of the people of Volozhin. He expressed his love in many stories about the shtetl's colorful "folksy types" Jews. Some of his stories were published in the Volozhin Yizkor Book. See: Reb Itshe der Balegole (coachman), Reb Hayim der Shnayder (the tailor), Reb Eyzer Der Raznoshtshik (postman) etc.

Here is some of the family story (I will post the entire story in a few days in "Volozhin stories").
Four days after the Germans invaded the Soviet Union we made our mind to escape. We fled Volozhin at night. We left most of our valuable possessions with our neighbor, Sholom Leyb Rubinstein, for safe keeping in his cave. We left the town almost empty handed. Our son Grisha took his bicycle. Reuven left for the journey wearing only his slippers. Good friends persuaded him that in soft slippers the walking would be easier. After walking many kilometers of a rocky road his slippers became torn exposing to the elements the bare flesh of his feet.
Our spirits lifted when we arrived to Mizheyk. Here we met with many Jews and multiple horse-harnessed carts. Some of them transported Volozhin families who escaped a few days before us: the Semernitski brothers, Berl Spector, Avrom Mlot, Khatskl der Olshaner, Hershl Sheyniuk with his wife and others. Since they left the town before us they were eager to hear the latest news from Volozhin. We told them that although it seems quiet now, the relative calmness should not be taken as an indication of the forthcoming days. We invited them to cross the Russian border as one big group. However they decided to return home. Avrom Mlot told us; "We fled, because we feared the bombings. Now that Volozhin is in German hands and the bombing stopped, we want to go back". The entire group went back directly into the lion's muzzle. They perished by the Nazi hands. All of them were later murdered.
We continued to walk and arrived in Rakov. There we met some acquaintances, who received us very cordially. Khayke Rubentshik (Guetsl Perski's sister) invited us to leave the children with her family. She promised to guard them. "The Germans", she said,"They are after Communists and their assistants only; they will not do any harm to innocent Jews and especially not to Jewish children." We did not trust the kind woman's "German proficiency"; we left Rakov taking our children with us.
At night we arrived to the 1939 border with Russia. We found there a big crowd of refugees on the Polish side of the border prior to 1939. (In 1939 during the partition of Poland the area became Soviet until the German invasion of July 1941) But the Soviet military guards closed the passageway to all former Polish citizens and forbade us from passing.
Having no other choice we returned to Rakov. On the way we met Leybke Hayim der Slovensker's son. He was wearing a soviet military coat; he told us that he carried in his cart women and children of Soviet Officers across the border. He advised us to try the border line passing in Volma, 15 Km from Rakov. We joined himt in this direction. To our sorrow we found that also this passage blocked for us. At noon we heard firing and saw people advancing on carts eastward. Leybke harnessed his horse and we succeeded to pass the Russian front.
We arrived in the town of Derzhinsk. To our disappointment Leybke announced that he's returning home. All our arguments did not help to change his mind. He left with us his horse-harnessed cart and returned into the lion's muzzle, where he perished with all of our shtetl's inhabitants.
After some days of travel Leybke's horse ran out his vigor and was not able to advance any more. We stood there perplex not knowing where from whom we could be helped. After a short time help appeared in the form of a gentile boy riding on a horse. He was ready to exchange his horse for Grisha's bicycle. Grisha agreed.
We harnessed the new horse and arrived swiftly to Mstsislav (near Mohilev), where a Soviet mobilization office was active. It was announced that all men under the age of 50 should report to military service. I (Reuven) reported myself and was at once nominated as Politrook (Political Supervisor) of the third battalion in the Soviet Red Army.
I obtained two hours leave to separate from my family. We did not know where our fate would takee us. We agreed that if we survive we should search each other at my aunt's home in Stalinabad, now Dooshambe in Tadzhikistan.
Rachel with the children Etele and Grisha did arrive to Stalinabad after a long jorney. In Stalinabad they were provided with an apartment. Rachel obtained a job and the children went to school.
I participated in many battles that took place in Crimea: in Perekop, Simferopol, Feodesia and Sebastopol. In the last town I was wounded and sent to a hospital in Uzbekistan. Major Dumin, a wounded officer, who was hospitalized with me, helped me to find my aunt and through her my family. My wife and children visited me. Two months later I was strong enough to leave the hospital and join the family.
My son Grisha volunteered into the Red Army at the age of fifteen. At the end of 1942 he was heavily wounded in the Stalingrad battle.



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A post war visit to Volozhin
By Rachel & Reuven Rogovin
Translated from Hebrew; from the Volozhin yizkor book.

We left Tadzhikistan and came to live in Riga in 1946. One day we decided to visit Volozhin. As soon as we arrived there we found out that we had nothing, but completely nothing to see of our life prior to the war. Volozhin, the Jewish shtetl did not exist. I recalled the words of our poet Bialik (a student of the Volozhin Yeshiva) "Look around, my friend. On your heart are ruins, only ruins".
On the first day we met our Christian friend; Roman Horbatshevski. With tears in his eyes, he told us that he hid behind a fence and watched the shtetl’s Jews marching to their death. "They walked silently, as if ignoring the faith awaiting for them" he said. "Tell me Mr. Rogovin, why did they accept the verdict, why did they not resist?" I left the question without an answer.
After some days we met an old friend Mr. Katovitz the orthodox priest from Losk. He was really glad to see us and could not hide the joy that he was ‘blessed" to see us alive. He invited us to visit our mutual friend the priest Salizh, who asked for the second time the faithful question: "Why did they not resist?"
This time I could not restrain myself and answered his question with a question:
"You don’t understand why the Jews did not resist? And the fact that from four millions Red Army captives only 3% had survived? And why did not they show any resistance? The Soviet Communists and Commissars that were taken prisoners by the Nazis, they knew that they would be exterminated, why did they not fight for their lives? And the thousands of Polish Officers that were murdered by the Soviet NKVD in the Katyn forest, - why did they not resist? Do you understand it? The answer, your holiness you might receive only from the holy martyrs that were terrorized, humiliated, famished by the Nazis and not only abandoned but commonly haunted by their gentile neighbors.
The conversation farther spoiled our gloomy state of mind. We decided to go to the Jewish Grave Yard, in which our dearests were buried. We looked at the vast area of the common graves. They looked like small grass covered hills. A committee inquiring about the Nazi crimes was active in Volozhin at the time of our visit there. A grave was opened. Woe to the eyes that saw it. We looked at the murdered. Despite the flesh that was shed from the bodies we could recognize some of our friends. We have no words to describe it. For this reason it would be better not to scrub the wounds and not add pain to our unbearable pain. We mentioned here a drop of the hell we have seen and we leave the reader to imagine it. But as horrible as it would be to imagine it, it would never resemble the dreadful reality of what our eyes have seen while looking at the remains of the Volozhin Jews.
We visited Volozhin again prior to our Aliya to Israel in 1958. We went again to look at our Brothers common grave. The years diminished the tomb. The hill sank as though it had been swallowed by the enormity of the crime committed here. Our brothers’ blood had leaked into the very depth of the earth. But to our sorrow it did not leave any sign and did not overthrew the world’s foundations. Life went on like nothing had occurred here. Pigs were burrowing inside the graves of the last of the Volozhin congregation members, the congregation that lived there for five hundred years. I conclude with a wish that the mourning for our fallen community will never end.

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Dear Ms Eilat
I would like to donate a $100.00 towards the restoration
of the cemetery and monument on Krave, In Wiszniewo. I hope
that it is the nicest restoration in Belarus. These martyrs
deserve the best and may they rest in peace.

Please advise by E-mail: where do I send the check

Thanks

plastic6@juno.com
Charles Straczynski
cHARLES STRACZYNSKI plastic6@juno.com
BONITA, CA USA -

Dear Eilat , Shalom ,
We are sending you the letter we are going to send to the American descendants of Vishnive ,
Thank you for your nice donation . We collected until now 550$ . We are in contact with Ms. Zane Busby .
She will collect the donations In the US. At the end we think about adding the list of donations to your guestbook of Vishnive . We hope wi`ll have enough money for the project .
yours ,
Dvora & Uri
To: All Vishnive Families and Descendants

From: Dvora Rogovin Helberg and Uri Helberg, Modi'in, Israel

Date: December 24th , 2001


Renovation of the Jewish Cemetery in Vishnive and Additional Projects


Dear Friends,

My parents, Mordechai and Chaia Elishkevich Rogovin, of blessed memory, left Vishnive for Eretz Israel in the 1930's. Most of our family perished in the Holocaust.

In May,1996 we visited Vishnive. This is what we found:

The Jewish Cemetery is totally neglected. It is almost inaccessible due to very thick, wild growth of trees, thorny bushes and grass. The stones are toppled, partially covered with dirt, and in very poor shape.

The Mass Grave, near the Jewish Cemetery, where the first group of 38 Jewish victims was gunned down and buried in August, 1941, is not even marked with a Stone.

On Krave Street, where the Jewish population of the shtetl was slaughtered and burned on August 30th, 1942 there is a memorial which states, only in Russian, the death of "2000 Soviet Citizens" totally ignoring the fact that all of the victims were Jews.

During our visit we discussed with our guide, Ms. Regina Kopilevich, the following needs: I. Renovation of the Jewish Cemetery II. Erection of a Stone at the site of the 1941 Mass Grave and III. Addition to the Krave Street Memorial stating clearly in English, Hebrew and Russian that all of the victims were Jews and were murdered by the Nazis and their local collaborators.

At the time of our visit we also saw other shtetls in this region and found many new Jewish Memorials erected by families and descendants who mainly live in the US and Israel.

Recently Regina told us that she took Ms. Zane Buzby (a descendant of the Podbereski Family) on a tour of Vishnive. At that time they talked with the Director of Culture in Vishnive. She told them that she could organize a cleaning and maintenance project for the Jewish Cemetery. In exchange for this project she asked for a $1000 contribution for the heating and renovation of the local kindergarten.

We volunteered to help in this important project by trying to collect donations from Visnive families and descendants who live in Israel. Ms. Zane Buzby volunteered to collect donations in America. If we succeed in collecting more than $1000, we will pursue the Krave Street Memorial Addition and the 1941 Mass Grave Stone.

Regina is a Jewish resident of Vilna. She speaks the local languages in addition to English and Hebrew. She frequently guides Israeli and American visitors to Vishnive. She volunteered to be the contact person between us, Ms. Buzby and the Director of Culture in Vishnive, and to oversee the execution of the project.

So far several hundred dollars have been collected. Your donation is requested. We ourselves have donated $100. Any amount contributed will be thankfully accepted.

LET'S ACT NOW! LET'S NOT PROCRASTINATE BECAUSE THIS OPPORTUNITY MAY BE LOST!

We will inform you of the progress of our mission.

If you know other Vishnive descendants, please let them know what we mean to accomplish.

For your information, we have set up an Internet Memorial Site for Vishnive and our family. The site address is:

www.geocities.com/vishnive
This site has links to other sites concerning Vishnive.

Ms. Buzby's e-mail:


cbmail@earthlink.net
***
Dvora & Uri Helberg`s address in Israel :
Helberg
3/3 Savion St.
Modi`in , 71700
Israel
Tel: 08-0720407
helberg@netvision.net.il
***

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Dear Vishnievo Landslayt,
In the name of Volozhin descendants in Israel I would be glad to join Devora’s effort to preserve and to rewrite in Hebrew & English the memorials of the Jewish life and genocide in Vishnievo. I asked Mme Devora to receive our humble contribution of 250 Israeli Shekels to help accomplish her blessed project.
I’m familiar with the sensation when coming to the annihilated birthplace you find out that even the memorials do not recall the Jewish life that lasted there for centuries.
Three years ago visiting Volozhin we have met the same phenomenon. I have done all possible to erect a memorial to our dearest martyrs. We wrote the text in Hebrew, English and Russian. The photos are placed in the jewishgen site:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin/volozhin.html


Moshe PORAT poratm@netvision.net.il
Tel Aviv, Israel -

Date: 12/23/01 6:27:07 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: helberg@netvision.net.il helberg
To:eilatgordn@aol.com (Eilat & Danni Levitan)
Dear Eilat ,
We are sending a letter (in Hebrew ) to the descendants of Vishnive in Israel to join us in raising money for the clearing and maintaining of the Jewish cemetery in Vishnive. If we can get enough money we will add a gravestone mentioning that the victims were Jews ( As it is mentioned on many stones in cemeteries near Vishnive - In Hebrew and English ) .

To Zane Buzby
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2001 3:47 PM
In 1997 we visited Poland. During our visit we found out that the Goverment of The U.S is supporting the preservation of heritage if there are American citizens who are descendants of people who came to the U.S from the area.
The address is :

The United Sates Comission for the Preservation of America`s Heritage Abroad .
1101 15th. st. NW
Washington D.C. 20005
Fax: (202) 254 3934
Tel; (202) 254 3824Date: 12/23/01 6:27:07 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: helberg@netvision.net.il helberg
To:eilatgordn@aol.com (Eilat & Danni Levitan)


We decided to join your efforts to collect money for clearing and maintaining the Jewish cemetery of Vishnive . We shall send a letter to Vishnive natives and their descendants in Israel to raise money here. We shall give Regina 200$ for us and for Dvora`s brother Zvi & Judy Rogovin from St.-Paul Minn.

yours , Dvora & Uri

I also gave $150 to Zane for the the Jewish cemetery project in Vishnive. Eilat
.
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from http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_mail.html
Avraham-Binyamin Elishkevich was killed with his father Yaacov-Hirsh during the first months when the Germans invaded Vishnevo (with the 39 http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_pages/vstories_forget.html).
here are some Letters he wrote from Vishnive to his aunt in Israel prior to the German invasion

A Letter from Avraham-Binyamin, My Nephew, January 1st, 1939
(Originally written in Hebrew)

To my dear aunt, Shalom!

I read your letter. I am at home now, on winter break from school. We, thank God, are healthy. Uncle Leibl is healthy and working. Grandmother, as you know, is bedridden. Nothing new in your home. Also, nothing new in Vishnive. It is the middle of winter. Snow is falling, but our youth have begun organizing.

Graduates of the school formed a group called "Graduate Organization". They meet every Friday evening at the school. There are lectures in Hebrew, and the teachers are participating. They talk about news from Eretz Israel, such as about "Chanita"(a new settlement). They sing and dance and hope to make "Aliyah". That is how we are spending the long winter nights, here in the "Exile", hoping for a more glorious future.

My life at the Gymnasia (senior high school) is similar to your life in Eretz Israel. When we are in the Gymnasia speaking Hebrew, we forget about being in the "Exile" and imagine that we are in Eretz Israel.

Regards to all the Vishniveans in Eretz Israel, to my friend Shimon Persky*, to Zvi Abramson, to all the relatives, to Henech and his family, to Chaim and his family, to Aharon Zvi and his family, to Chaia Rivka, to Mordechai.

Regards from Grandmother, from Rivka, from Leibl, from Uncle Yosef, from Aunt Mari, from all the family, from Father, from Mother, from Chaimke.


Shalom and Le'hitraot (Good bye and see you) in Eretz Israel
Chazak Ve'ematz! (Be firm and of good courage!)
* Shimon Peres
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_m1.html
A Postcard from Avraham-Binyamin and Chaim Elishkevich, April 15th, 1941
(Written in Moskover Yiddish)

Dear Aunt and Uncle,

We received your postcard. We are glad to hear about your health. We are healthy and satisfied with our lives. I'm finishing my third year of Senior High School in the Russian School here in Vishnive. Studies in the Soviet school are free of charge. Anybody can study whatever he wishes and can become the most educated person. Comrade Lenin said: Study, study, and study again. This is the message from the Soviet youth.

Be healthy and strong, from your nephew who is wishing you good life, A.B. Elishkevich. Regards from Everybody.

Dear Aunt and Uncle, How are you? We are healthy. I study in 5th Grade (elementary school) in the Public Yiddish School in Vihnive. I study very well. Regards to all, from your nephew, Chaim Elishkevich.

Dear Sister and Brother-in-Law, We thank you for your postcard. We are healthy, working and living. We are very worried about your security in Eretz Israel with regard to the current war…..(written by Yaacov-Hirsh

To the original postcard http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_m2.html


Avraham Binyamin Elishkevich, July 10th, 1940
(Written in Moskover Yiddish)

Dear Aunt Chaia,

We received your postcard. I can write to you that all of us are healthy. Father is working as the principal of the Public Yiddish School in Vishnive. I am already in my third year of Senior High School in the Russian School. Chaim is in 5th Grade (elementary school) in the Public Yiddish School. Otherwise nothing is new with us. We are living and very satisfied with our lives under the leadership of Comrade Stalin*. We are thanking him daily for freeing us from the ugly capitalistic Polish rule.

Regards from Father, Mother and Chaim, Grandmother, Leibl, Rivka, Gitke, Uncle Yosef, Grandfather, the aunts and their children. Regards to all the Vishniveans.

From me, your nephew, Avraham-Binyamin Elishkevich.

* Note: All letters from the Soviet period contained at least one Thank You sentence to Comrade Stalin.
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_m4.html
VISHNIVE Yakov-Hirsh Elishkevitch
http://www.geocities.com/vishnive/hirsh.html


click here for the Elishkevitch memorial
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On October 2001 Dvora and I went to Kibbutz Eilon to meet
Shimon Podboreski who lives there . We all were very excited of our meeting.
He is 87 years old, he remembered Dvoras parents from Vishnive and also met them
in Israel many years ago. Shimon`s daughter, Talma, is married to Yossi
who`s mother is also from Vishnive - her name is Batya Yachas-Rabinovich ,
We met Batya and she were also very excited to see Dvora because she knew
her parents ever since they were children.
We also met Regina Kopilevich who was our guide on our tour of Vilnius and
Vishnive 1996 . She was amazing. Regina made the connection to Zane Buzby-
they are trying to collect money for the recovery of the Jewish cemetery in
Vishnive .
I`m sending you 3 photos , one is with Regina and the others are the Helbrg
family and Dvora , Talma and Shimon Podboreski (from Vishnive, Kibbutz Eilon ) .
Regards ,

Uri and Dvora.
"THE SHTETL AND I" by Dvora Rogovin Helberg
Translation from Hebrew by Dvoras' brother; Zvi Rogovin
Contents

First Volume: World War I Memories
Olshani:
The Shtetl is Burning
First Stop - Olshani
The Adventures of Leibl & Yaacov-Hirsh, When We Were in Olshani
Cease Fire


Grodno District
Traveling to Grodno District - Volkovisk
Vichodnitza - The Picturesque Village
Orphanhood


Second Volume: Vishnive After World War I
Back to Vishnive
Back to Vishnive
A Wedding in the Shtetl
"Tarbut" School in Vishnive
The Wedding of My Sister Rachel-Lea


What Will I be When I'm a Grown-Up?
Sewing
Studies in Vilna
Vilna - The "Jerusalem of Lithuania" in my Time


The 1930's
Back to Vishnive - 1929
Gitke on "Hachshara"
How I Made "Aliyah" - Part A
How I Made "Aliyah" - Part B


Third Volume: Vishnive After my "Aliyah"
The Destruction
Letters from Vishnive
The Destruction of the Jewish Community by the Nazis
Vishnive After the War


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Post a message in our guestbook
(Note: English and Hebrew-font enabled)
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_index.html
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Appendix
VISHNIVE "TARBUT" SCHOOL - 1923 Annual picture, including the names of students and teachers

Rivka Rogovin Bekman’s Memories — Written in 1934


Link to Vishnevo homepage, edited by Eilat Gordin Levitan.


Link to Rogovin and Elishkevich memorial site, edited by Yuval Helberg


click here to read "THE SHTETL AND I" by Dvora Rogovin Helberg
-

Dear Vishnievo Landsleyt,
Our family visited Volozhin on autumn 1998. The Volozhin authorities received us very friendly. They offered each one of us the memory book of the Volozhin region. It is written in Belarus. I found it interesting data about Volozhin, VISHNIEVO, Rakov, Ivianits, and Zabrezhe, about those Shtetlah and the Jews that lived there and were exterminated. We translated some chapters and placed in the JewishGen site by the Volozhin region Mayor’s permission. I recommend to read it in order to have some understanding how the gentiles see us.
M. Porat (Perlman)

The address: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin1/volozhin1.html

Memory to Volozhin Region (Volozhin, Belarus)
54°05' / 26°32'
Translation of Pamiat-Volozhinski Rayon
Published in Minsk, 1996
Our sincere appreciation to V. I. Malishevski, Regional Executive Committee Chairman and the Region Editorial Commission for the creation of the History-Documental "Pamiat" Book Chairman, for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.
.
This is a translation from: Pamiat-Volozhinski Rayon (Memory to Volozhin Region). Minsk "Mastatskaya Literatura," 1996. Litsenzia LV No 3, 220600 Republique Belarus, Minsk, 11 Masherov Avenue

Table of Contents
(partial)

Article Author Page
Introduction
The Volozhin Region area
Islotsh (Brook of the Berezina River)
New order in Vishnievo K. Pobal TD  td164
The destruction of Volozhin's Jews M. Batvinnik 164
The destruction of Rakov Jews 165
Memories from Vishnievo Ghetto Ema Mikhaylovna Murtshanka 166
Vishnievo Slaughter Witnesses Gelanovo & vicinity peasants 167
The Town Volozhin Martyrs of Hitler's terror 253
Zabrezhe - Jewish Martyrs 261


Moshe Porat poratm@netvision.net.il
Tel Aviv, Israel -

I would like to congratulate Nancy Collier Holden nholden@interserv.com and Chaya Lupinsky mailto:lupinsky@netvision.net.il for the most beautiful and informative job they have done in creating a site for Myadel
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/myadel/index.htm
From the site map;
Myadel ~ Stary Myadel ~ Miadel ~ Miadelai ~ Miadziol ~ Miadziel ~ Stary Miadziol ~ Nowy Miadziol
in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania ~ Poland ~ Russia ~ United Soviet Socialist Republics ~ Belarus
The Myadel Region: Myadel ~ Stary Myadel
1. Region of Calm and Dreaming Lakes Part I (Three part article from a biography of Rabbi Eliahu Gordon)
The Myadel Region (links to maps and locators, geology, geography, industry, architecture and travel)
Aerial Map of Myadel Landscape
Print enlarged Aerial Map
2. How Miadziol adopted Family Names Part II
Surnames in Myadel

1923 Myadel Business Directory

Households in Myadel
Printable Map


Lithuanian State Historical Archives
Supplemental Lists


Miadziol 1765

Miadziol 1784

Stary Miadziol 1765



3. Jews and Lithuanians Part III
History of the Jews in the Myadel Region (links to history, timelines, Jews in the Pale of Settlement)

Life in Myadel by Arye Geskin

Rabbi Avraham Shmuel Kosczevsky of Myadel

Pandemics 1800-1900 in Myadel Region

Deaths in Myadel 1811-1831

The cemetery in Myadel 30th of August, 1941

Memorial 1993

To my dear friends Miadler (An open letter from Sarah and John Alper of Canada)

Memorial and names from the murder site, September 21 1942

Deaths in Myadel 1941-1944

4. Photographic Portraits of the Myadel Region
5. Contacts
From the Visitors Journal;
I have always tried to form a picture of the towns in the Myadel Region, especially Myadel and Kobylnik.

I wanted to walk on the streets of our past. I longed to see the stream where the fish were caught; the river where my great great grandfather set the cut trees adrift; the lake when the sun set; the dusty roads that led to Vilna and the forests where the wolves howled. My grandmother was born there. My great grandfather ran the mill nearby. My great great grandmother had a store on the Jewish Street. My great great great grandfather was the box tax collector. My family lived in Myadel for at least seven generations before coming to America in 1894.
This site is my patchwork. It longs for your stories and your family names. It will be richer for the memories of all our ancestors. In hopes that I have been able to bring you some of what I longed for, please contribute your comments.
What kind of comment would you like to send?
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/myadel/Journal.htm
Please visit the site at http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/myadel/index.htm and click here to write a note to Nancy.
-

Rivka nee Rogovin Bekman's Memories - Written in 1934
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_rivka.html

Rivka Rogovin Bekman (1912-1981) was born and raised in Vishnive and lived there until 1935 when she made "Aliyah" to Eretz Israel. Two of her brothers, Gershon Rogovin (1906-1992) and Mordechai Rogovin (1910-1982) had immigrated earlier. Gershon came first in 1926, followed by Mordechai in 1932.

The following are selected parts of Rivka's memories dated January 10th, 1934. She described what happened to the Rogovin family during the period when they returned to Vishnive in 1917 (having fled the War) only to find that the war was still going on between the Russians and the Poles.

...In this bad time (WWI) when we were refugees in Vilna, Mother gave birth to a son. I got additional work rocking him. It would not be that difficult if I were not alone in the house and if there were no mice. When I was alone in the house with the baby, mice would come out from all corners. They were as big as cats and were crawling all over the floor....

.....We returned home to our shtetl, Vishnive, after WWI. We found our house was occupied by German soldiers and there was no room for us. We looked for another residence but this was very difficult because most of the shtetl was burned. With blessed God's help, we found a king's palace in the shape of a small apartment with tiny windows. The windows were made of German glass, criss-crossed with iron wires, which added to the darkness inside the house. The house belonged to my cousin, Aharon Leib. This was an old ruin from the time of King Sobietzki. We felt as if the roof was going to collapse over our heads any minute. We lived there for a year with other neighbors. Although they lived there before us, they allowed us to join them because we were relatives of the owner....


....Because of Vishnive's proximity to the border, it was a target for frequent military attacks. I remember large legions of soldiers invading and demanding food. They used to search in every corner of the house. It looked terrible when they turned the beds upside down and the feathers would fly out of the pillows. After such an intrusion, we had no desire to fix the beds knowing that another group would be coming soon and creating similar upheaval....

...Time and again we were sure the soldiers would kill us when we did not have any food to give them. They were threatening us, waving their pistols. Finally Mother knew what to do. During each attack she would immediately prepare food for the hungry soldiers, even if she had to use the last supplies which were intended for feeding her own hungry children.....

....One day after a mild attack was over my cousin, who was also our neighbor, wanted my brother Mordechai to go to the pharmacy downtown and buy some medicine for his sick cow. As soon as Mordechai left, a heavy attack began. We hid in our Christian neighbor's basement. I remember some soldiers who were probably Jew-haters, looking down into the basement and asking if there were any Jews down there. Our neighbor was standing at the entry while we, the little children, were playing. Our parents were hiding behind us. The answer was negative of course, but one can imagine our fear. We could not forgive ourselves for sending Mordechai out during such dangerous shooting. We waited anxiously until the shooting stopped. As soon as we left our hiding place, Modechai showed up. One cannot describe our joy. He told us that when the shooting began he was near the pharmacy. He could not run back home. He and a soldier were taking cover behind house corners and behind fences. They moved from one hiding place to another until a bullet killed the soldier. Mordechai continued hiding and moving until he reached the home of our relative. He knocked on the door and yelled for help. After calling out his name, he was allowed in. He joined them lying on the floor until the shooting was over....
A memorable event that I must write about happened as follows: Russian soldiers were eating inside our house. Suddenly my brother Shlomo came in through the back door with a Polish Jewish soldier from Sokolke. This soldier was escaping from a Russian POW camp. The soldier begged to change his clothing so he could continue escaping. When Mother saw him and heard his Polish accent she was very scared. The Russians were only several steps away eating in the other room. If they found him hiding at our home all of us would be killed. But if she gave him away, he would not survive. Her pity was stronger than her fear. She gave him some old clothing and sent him to hide in the cattle pasture during the daytime. She also gave him some food so he would not starve. At night he slept in our house. Every night we were very scared until the Russians left the area several weeks later. When Polish soldiers finally entered our area he joined them and left us.


click for the rest and for pictures of Rivka and her family.
-

BOOK BY PROFESSOR IOFFE TELLS ABOUT CONTRIBUTIONS OF BELARUS JEWS TO DEVELOPMENT OF ISRAELI STATEHOOD

Elizer Ben-Ieguda is called the "father of modern Hebrew". He comes from village Luzhki of Sharkovshchina region of Vitebsk oblast. Owing to him once dead language was restored, became a spoken language and the state one in Israel. The first President of Israel Khaim Veitzman was born in the village of Motyl of Ivanovo region of Brest oblast. These and many other interesting facts concerning the contributions of the Jews of Belarus to the development of the Jewish statehood are contained in the new book by famous historian, political scientist and sociologist professor Emanuil Ioffe. The book's title is "The Belarusian Jews in Israel". It was published in the Minsk publishing house "Kovcheg".

One of the first settlers in the territory where the state of Israel appeared in 1948 were the natives of the Great Duchy of Litwa, Rzecz Pospolita and the Belarusian lands of the Russian Empire. Now more than 100 thousand natives of Belarus live in Israel. They founded new towns and settlements, plants and educational establishments.

It is difficult to imagine the science, health care system and culture of Israel without the names of gifted Belarusians. The third President of the country Zalman Shazar was born in the village of Mir, Korelichy region, ex-prime ministers Itshak Shamir comes from the town of Ruzhany, Pruzhany region of Brest area, Menahem Begin - from Brest, Shimon Peres - from the village of Vishnevo, Volozhinsky region of Grodno area. During ten years, the Israeli Parliament was headed by Caddish Luz from Bobruisk. Brakhot from the town of Chaussy in Mogilev area was the first Yiddish writer in Palestine. Mia Arbatova from the Belarusian town of Dribin of Mogilev area became a prima ballerina and a choreographer of the Tel Aviv Opera-Amamit.



.
-

Ruben, Harry 10 Apr born; 1894 in Wishnevo Vilno Russia Sunflower MS
Ruben, Joe 9 Aug born; 1887 W in Wishnueo Russia
.
USA -

The history of naturalization in the United States is somewhat
complex. The complexity is aggravated for women by the fact that the
laws regarding naturalization and females were ambiguous, especially
before 1907. For a significant portion of American history, a woman's
citizenship status was derived from the status of her husband. In
many cases immigrant women were naturalized "by default" upon their
marriage to a citizen or upon their foreign-born husband obtaining
citizenship. This derivative type of citizenship is the reason there
are few naturalization records for immigrant women for most of
American history. For those who were "naturalized by marriage" there
generally is no mention of them in any records before 27 September
1906, when Congress standardized the naturalization process and
required names of spouse and children on naturalization paperwork.
Also, until women received the right to vote, there was little reason
for many to bother with the expense and procedure of naturalization.
However, there are occasionally naturalization records for women in
the 1880s, 1890s and later. Many of the children "naturalized by
default" via their father's naturalization, but not listed
specifically, later went through the naturalization process
themselves.

To reduce confusion, here is a brief chronology relevant to the
problem at hand:

1906

The Basic Naturalization Act was passed on 27 September 1906, which
standardized the naturalization process throughout the United States.
Records after this date are more consistent than those before. No
longer could just any court perform a naturalization.

1907

On 2 March 1907 an act was passed wherein a wife's citizenship status
was determined by the status of her husband. Here is where the
confusion begins to get worse. For women who immigrated after this
act (and before later changes were enacted), there was no real change
from before (unless their husband was already a U.S. citizen).
However, it was different for U.S.-born citizen females who married
an alien after this date. These women would lose their citizenship
status upon marriage to an alien. Many of these women would later
become citizens again upon their husband's naturalization. Women who
married men who were racially ineligible to naturalize lost their
ability to revert back to their pre-marriage citizenship status.

1922

On 22 September 1922, Congress passed the Married Women's Act, also
known as the Cable Act. Now the citizenship status of a woman and a
man were separate. This law gave each woman her own citizenship
status. This act was partially drawn in response to issues regarding
women's citizenship that occurred after women were given the right to
vote. From this date, no marriage to an alien has taken citizenship
from any U.S.-born woman. Females who had lost their citizenship
status via marriage to an alien could initiate their own
naturalization proceedings.

1936

This act effected U.S. citizen women whose marriage to an alien
between the acts of 1907 and 1922 had caused them to lose their
citizenship status. These women, if the marriage to the alien had
ended in death or divorce, could regain their citizenship by filing
an application with the local naturalization court and taking an oath
of allegiance. Those women still married to their husband were not
covered under the act and these individuals would have to go through
the complete naturalization process.

1940

In 1940, Congress allowed all women who lost their citizenship status
between 1907 and 1922 to repatriate by filling an application with
the local naturalization court and taking an oath. The complete
naturalization process was no longer necessary for any woman whose
marriage between 1907 and 1922 caused her to lose her citizenship
status.

.
USA -

he history of naturalization in the United States is somewhat
complex. The complexity is aggravated for women by the fact that the
laws regarding naturalization and females were ambiguous, especially
before 1907. For a significant portion of American history, a woman's
citizenship status was derived from the status of her husband. In
many cases immigrant women were naturalized "by default" upon their
marriage to a citizen or upon their foreign-born husband obtaining
citizenship. This derivative type of citizenship is the reason there
are few naturalization records for immigrant women for most of
American history. For those who were "naturalized by marriage" there
generally is no mention of them in any records before 27 September
1906, when Congress standardized the naturalization process and
required names of spouse and children on naturalization paperwork.
Also, until women received the right to vote, there was little reason
for many to bother with the expense and procedure of naturalization.
However, there are occasionally naturalization records for women in
the 1880s, 1890s and later. Many of the children "naturalized by
default" via their father's naturalization, but not listed
specifically, later went through the naturalization process
themselves.

To reduce confusion, here is a brief chronology relevant to the
problem at hand:

1906

The Basic Naturalization Act was passed on 27 September 1906, which
standardized the naturalization process throughout the United States.
Records after this date are more consistent than those before. No
longer could just any court perform a naturalization.

1907

On 2 March 1907 an act was passed wherein a wife's citizenship status
was determined by the status of her husband. Here is where the
confusion begins to get worse. For women who immigrated after this
act (and before later changes were enacted), there was no real change
from before (unless their husband was already a U.S. citizen).
However, it was different for U.S.-born citizen females who married
an alien after this date. These women would lose their citizenship
status upon marriage to an alien. Many of these women would later
become citizens again upon their husband's naturalization. Women who
married men who were racially ineligible to naturalize lost their
ability to revert back to their pre-marriage citizenship status.

1922

On 22 September 1922, Congress passed the Married Women's Act, also
known as the Cable Act. Now the citizenship status of a woman and a
man were separate. This law gave each woman her own citizenship
status. This act was partially drawn in response to issues regarding
women's citizenship that occurred after women were given the right to
vote. From this date, no marriage to an alien has taken citizenship
from any U.S.-born woman. Females who had lost their citizenship
status via marriage to an alien could initiate their own
naturalization proceedings.

1936

This act effected U.S. citizen women whose marriage to an alien
between the acts of 1907 and 1922 had caused them to lose their
citizenship status. These women, if the marriage to the alien had
ended in death or divorce, could regain their citizenship by filing
an application with the local naturalization court and taking an oath
of allegiance. Those women still married to their husband were not
covered under the act and these individuals would have to go through
the complete naturalization process.

1940

In 1940, Congress allowed all women who lost their citizenship status
between 1907 and 1922 to repatriate by filling an application with
the local naturalization court and taking an oath. The complete
naturalization process was no longer necessary for any woman whose
marriage between 1907 and 1922 caused her to lose her citizenship
status.

.
USA -

Jewish Revision Lists in Lithuanian Archives
http://users.erols.com/hrhode/How_to/Article_4/body_article_4.htm

by Harold Rhode*
On my visit to Lithuania in July 1997, Galina Baranova, chief archivist of the State Historical Archives in Vilnius and Vitalija Girschte, chief archivist of the Kaunas archives, gave me the lists of Jewish reviski skazki (revision lists) held in their archives. Most of the lists in Vilnius are not cited in Jewish Vital Records, Revision Lists and Other Jewish Holdings in the Lithuanian Archives, by Harold Rhode and Sallyann Amdur Sack. (Teaneck, New Jersey: Avotaynu, 1996).


Revision lists for the four northwestern districts (uezds) of Belarus–Disna, Lida, Oshmian and Vileika–also are held in Vilnius (and not in Belarus). Prior to the Russian Revolution, these districts belonged to Vilna guberniya (province), which was then divided among Lithuania, Poland and Soviet Byelorussia. After World War II, the area that had been Vilna guberniya before World War I was again divided, this time between Lithuania and Soviet Byelorussia. Soviet rules for archives mandated that fonds of the governor general's office and those of the treasury remain in the capital city of the old guberniya in which they were created. Other fonds, such as those holding metrical (e.g., birth, marriage and death) records were transfered to regional archives.





Oshmiany Uyezd
Some General Revision Lists for 1816. General Revision Lists for 1834 and 1858. Some Additional Revision Lists for the periods 1859-64, 1868-69, 1870-71, 1872-77, 1874-84; lists of Changed Registrations for 1883-84; some Additional Revision Lists for 1892-95 and 1905-08
Towns in first uchastok: Devenishki, Golshany, Lipnishki, Oshmiany, Traby, Zhuprany
Towns in second uchastok: Dereviany, Krevo, Nalibokoye, Smorgon, Solsk, Vishnevo, Volozhin, Zaskeviche
Vileika uezd
Jewish Revision Lists for 1834 and 1850
Towns in first uchastok: Budy, Gorodok, Grudetz, Ida, Kraisk, Kurenec, Lebedevo, Molodechno, Radoshkov, Rzhetzkoye
Towns in second uchastok: Bubslavy, Burzlavka, Dolginovo, Duniloviche, Ilya, Krivichi, Miadeli, Vileika
*Harold Rhode is past president of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington and writes frequently for AVOTAYNU.

click here for the entire article by Harold Rhode
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Brest BELARUS Brest
Baranovichi BELARUS Brest
Kobrin BELARUS Brest
Luninec BELARUS Brest
Pinsk BELARUS Brest
Gorodishe BELARUS Brest
Bereza BELARUS Brest
Beloozersk BELARUS Brest
Domachevo BELARUS Brest
Gancevichi BELARUS Brest
Drogichin BELARUS Brest
7 Antopol BELARUS Brest
Gabinka BELARUS Brest
Ivanovo BELARUS Brest
5 Ivacevichi BELARUS Brest
65 Kossovo BELARUS Brest
77 Telehany BELARUS Brest
8 Kamenec BELARUS Brest
95 Vysokoe BELARUS Brest
7 Mikashevichi BELARUS Brest
Lyahovichi BELARUS Brest
Malorita BELARUS Brest
7 Logishin BELARUS Brest
Prugany BELARUS Brest
57 Rugany BELARUS Brest
67 Shereshevo BELARUS Brest
7 Stolin BELARUS Brest
85 David-Gorodok BELARUS Brest
97 Rechica BELARUS Brest
7 ,Vitbesk BELARUS ,Vitbesk
7 Ruba BELARUS ,Vitbesk
5 Lepel BELARUS ,Vitbesk
55 Novopolock BELARUS ,Vitbesk
56 Orsha BELARUS ,Vitbesk
65 Baran BELARUS ,Vitbesk
755 Polock BELARUS ,Vitbesk
86 Beshenkovichi BELARUS ,Vitbesk
97 Ulla BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Braslav BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Vidzy BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Druya BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Verhnedvinsk BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Osveya BELARUS ,Vitbesk

57 Surag BELARUS ,Vitbesk

67 Yanovichi BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Glubokoe BELARUS ,Vitbesk

87 Podsvile BELARUS ,Vitbesk

9 Gorodok BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Ezerishe BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Dokshicy BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Begoml BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Dubrovno BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Osintorf BELARUS ,Vitbesk

56 Liozno BELARUS ,Vitbesk

6 Miory BELARUS ,Vitbesk

75 Disna BELARUS ,Vitbesk

87 Kopys BELARUS ,Vitbesk

97 Orehovsk BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Vetrino BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Postavy BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Voropaevo BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Lyntupy BELARUS ,Vitbesk

6 Rossony BELARUS ,Vitbesk

5 Senno BELARUS ,Vitbesk

67 Bogushevsk BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Tolochin BELARUS ,Vitbesk

87 Kohanovo BELARUS ,Vitbesk

96 Ushachi BELARUS ,Vitbesk

Chashniki BELARUS ,Vitbesk

5 Novolukoml BELARUS ,Vitbesk

7 Oktyabrskij BELARUS ,Vitbesk

6 Sharkovshina BELARUS ,Vitbesk

6 Shumilino BELARUS ,Vitbesk

57 Obol BELARUS ,Vitbesk

8 Gomel BELARUS Gomel

7 Kostyukovka BELARUS Gomel

5 Dobrush BELARUS Gomel

5 Globin BELARUS Gomel

55 Kalinkovichi BELARUS Gomel

656 Mozyr BELARUS Gomel

75 Rechica BELARUS Gomel

85 Rogachev BELARUS Gomel

95 Svetlogorsk BELARUS Gomel

6 Bragin BELARUS Gomel

7 Komarin BELARUS Gomel

Buda-Koshelevo BELARUS Gomel

7 Uvarovichi BELARUS Gomel

Vetka BELARUS Gomel

57 Bolshevik BELARUS Gomel

67 Terehovka BELARUS Gomel

7 Elsk BELARUS Gomel

8 Gitkovichi BELARUS Gomel

97 Turov BELARUS Gomel

7 Streshin BELARUS Gomel

7 Ozarichi BELARUS Gomel

6 Korma BELARUS Gomel

6 Lelchicy BELARUS Gomel

6 Loev BELARUS Gomel

5 Narovlya BELARUS Gomel

66 Oktyabrskij BELARUS Gomel

7 Petrikov BELARUS Gomel

87 Kopatkevichi BELARUS Gomel

95 Vasilevichi BELARUS Gomel

7 Belick BELARUS Gomel

7 Parichi BELARUS Gomel

7 Sosnovyj Bor BELARUS Gomel

Hojniki BELARUS Gomel

Chechersk BELARUS Gomel

7 Grodno BELARUS , Grodno

5 Smorgon BELARUS , Grodno

5 Volkovysk BELARUS , Grodno

55 Lida BELARUS , Grodno

55 Novogrudok BELARUS , Grodno

65 Slonim BELARUS , Grodno

76 Bolshaya Berestovica BELARUS , Grodno

87 Pogranichnyj BELARUS , Grodno

97 Krasnoselskij BELARUS , Grodno

7 Ross BELARUS , Grodno

6 Voronovo BELARUS , Grodno

7 Radun BELARUS , Grodno

5 Skidel BELARUS , Grodno

7 Sopockin BELARUS , Grodno

56 Dyatlovo BELARUS , Grodno

67 Kozlovshina BELARUS , Grodno

77 Novoelnya BELARUS , Grodno

86 Zelva BELARUS , Grodno

96 Ive BELARUS , Grodno

7 Yuratishki BELARUS , Grodno

6 Korelichi BELARUS , Grodno

7 Mir BELARUS , Grodno

7 Berezovka BELARUS , Grodno

7 Pervomajskij BELARUS , Grodno

5 Mosty BELARUS , Grodno

67 Lyubcha BELARUS , Grodno

76 Ostrovec BELARUS , Grodno

8 Oshmyany BELARUS , Grodno

96 Svisloch BELARUS , Grodno

7 Porozovo BELARUS , Grodno

Shuchin BELARUS , Grodno

7 Geludok BELARUS , Grodno

7 Ostryna BELARUS , Grodno

5 , Minsksk BELARUS , Minsk

57 Vostochnyj BELARUS , Minsk

57 Sokol BELARUS , Minsk

57 Sosny BELARUS , Minsk

5556 Borisov BELARUS , Minsk

56 Vilejka BELARUS , Minsk

575 Dzerginsk BELARUS , Minsk

585 Godino BELARUS , Minsk

59 Zaslavl BELARUS , Minsk

555 Molodechno BELARUS , Minsk

55 Sluck BELARUS , Minsk

555 Soligorsk BELARUS , Minsk

5 Berezino BELARUS , Minsk

5 Vologin BELARUS , Minsk

557 Ivenec BELARUS , Minsk

567 Negoreloe BELARUS , Minsk

577 Fanipol BELARUS , Minsk

58 Kleck BELARUS , Minsk

59 Kopyl BELARUS , Minsk

56 Krupki BELARUS , Minsk

57 Bobr BELARUS , Minsk

57 Holopenichi BELARUS , Minsk

56 Logojsk BELARUS , Minsk

57 Pleshenicy BELARUS , Minsk

55 Lyuban BELARUS , Minsk

567 Ureche BELARUS , Minsk

577 Radoshkovichi BELARUS , Minsk

586 Myadel BELARUS , Minsk

597 Krivichi BELARUS , Minsk

57 Svir BELARUS , Minsk

5 Nesvig BELARUS , Minsk

57 Gorodeya BELARUS , Minsk

5 Marina Gorka BELARUS , Minsk

57 Pravdinskij BELARUS , Minsk

557 Rudensk BELARUS , Minsk

567 Svisloch BELARUS , Minsk

57 Smolevichi BELARUS , Minsk

587 Zelenyj Bor BELARUS , Minsk

597 Krasnaya Sloboda BELARUS , Minsk

57 Starobin BELARUS , Minsk

5 Starye Dorogi BELARUS , Minsk

5 Stolbcy BELARUS , Minsk

56 Uzda BELARUS , Minsk

5 Cherven BELARUS , Minsk

557 Smilovichi BELARUS , Minsk

67 Mogilev BELARUS Mogilev

656 Bobrujsk BELARUS Mogilev

65 Gorki BELARUS Mogilev

65 Krichev BELARUS Mogilev

655 Osipovichi BELARUS Mogilev

666 Belynichi BELARUS Mogilev

677 Glusha BELARUS Mogilev

68 Byhov BELARUS Mogilev

696 Glusk BELARUS Mogilev

66 Kirovsk BELARUS Mogilev

6 Klimovichi BELARUS Mogilev

66 Klichev BELARUS Mogilev

6 Kostyukovichi BELARUS Mogilev

66 Krasnopole BELARUS Mogilev

656 Krugloe BELARUS Mogilev

66 Mstislavl BELARUS Mogilev

677 Grodzyanka BELARUS Mogilev

687 Elizovo BELARUS Mogilev

697 Tatarka BELARUS Mogilev

6 Slavgorod BELARUS Mogilev

66 Hotimsk BELARUS Mogilev

6 Chausy BELARUS Mogilev

6 Cherikov BELARUS Mogilev

6 Shklov BELARUS Mogilev


.
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MOLODECHNO (the nearest city to Vishnevo with population of near 100,000) Jewish Religious Community " Hevra Tegilim" Head of the community: Gennady BASKIN Total number of Jews: 1,000 . The community was formed in September 1998, registered in March 1999. Activities:"Kabbalat Shabbat". There is 1 synagogue.
http://eejhp.tripod.ca/map.htm#write

click here to write to the community
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Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp July 20, 1913
Smitkin, Schmul Male 18 year old Single Russia, Hebrew born in Wiznewe, Russia going to brother in Brooklyn
. Padwereski, Minke Female 17years old Single Russia, Hebrew Wiznewe, Russia going to uncle Dobe Guris?in New York.
. Soifer, Urdie F 35y W Russia, Hebrew Kanunetz, Russia http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DH%3A%5C%5CT715%2D2133%5C%5CT715%2D21330279%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=104108070092&name=Schmul%26nbsp%3BSmitkin&doa=July++++++20%2C+1913&port=Antwerp&line=0002
click for the original manifest
USA -

Life of Jewish Partisans and Jewish Family Camps in the Forest, From a Diary by a Jewish Partisan, 1942-1943


August 12, 1942

...The idea of the forest returned and came to life. After the second mass-murder all of us were certain that the Germans made no difference between one Jew and another... They deceived the Judenrat and the Jewish Police when they promised them that they would stay alive if they helped to carry out the slaughter, and in the end they killed them too. Once more we began to search for ways of escape outside the ghetto....

The first to escape were Jews from the neighborhood to Naliboki Forest. They disappeared and nothing more was heard of them. The people from Zhetl also went, to Lipiczanka Forest, and they were joined by some from Nowogrodek, who returned after a while to take with them their relatives and friends. From them we heard details of life in the forest. They have arms, they carry out attacks on Germans traveling on the roads; the peasants are afraid of them and supply them with food. There are Russian partisans in the forest who live on good terms with the Jews and carry out joint attacks on the Germans with them.

Young boys of 15 to 17 snatch arms from the Germans and fix stocks to pistols and rifles. A small group got together and moved out to the Belskis. Two of them came back to the ghetto. They would have nothing to do with anyone there, and refused to speak to their former friends weren't they partisans? They went back to the forest and took with them their relatives, wives and acquaintances.

[1943]

As a result of our many attacks on the Germans in the area of our camp, a German assault was to be expected any day. Information reached us that the Germans knew where we were. The Staff decided to dissolve the separate groups and to reestablish the Brigade.

At the beginning of April all the groups were ordered to leave their valleys and move within 24 hours to Brozova Forest in Stara-Huta.

We packed our belongings, filled our knapsacks, and fastened our blankets on top of them. The cooking gear and other things were loaded on carts and we moved out. The night was cloudy and the sky full of rain. The damp penetrated into the very marrow of our bones. The dry, bare branches of the young trees waved and bent hither and thither. Our thoughts were black too. Many of us had been lost in our wanderings from forest to forest, from base camp to base camp. They had fallen, and who knew what awaited us at the next base?

by day the snow began to melt. Long pools of water stretched along the sandy paths. We had many kilometers to go. Our feet sink in the mud as though it were soft dough. You want to rest and there is no place to sit. Everything is wet and damp. Now we have found a kind of hillock from which the water has run off. The people sit down, rest, eat their fill and then continue on their way. In this way we crossed forests, fields, and roads until we reached Brozova Forest, in Stara-Huta.

There we found groups that had arrived before us -- the group of Yudel Belski, who had lost 10 of his best men; he had few fighting men and their arms were poor: the group could no longer survive on its own. Also the Dworecki group, which had arrived early at the new base. The cold was not yet over and they had built huts for themselves.

After a brief consultation we decided not to build huts. We found a dry hill, stretched out on our knapsacks, rested and set about putting up a shelter of branches.

In the course of a few days all the groups gathered in one place. We began to live according to the plan that had applied before the winter. Every evening the whole unit assembled. One platoon was selected for guard duty for the next 24 hours; several groups were sent out to get food; the people were divided up according to kitchens, each group doing its own cooking. The groups received their supplies from a central store, in accordance with the number of its members.

At the beginning of April a group of Jews and their families were sent to us from the Iskra (spark) group. Their arms were taken from them and they were told to join the Jewish company. These were the first Jewish refugees from Lida Ghetto. The young and single people stayed with the Russians....

J. Jaffe, Partizanim ("Partisans"), Tel Aviv, 1951, pp. 24-25, 70-72.



.
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Would like to know anybody who has heard of the name SMITKIN
or perhaps new schmual Smitkin who arrived in 1913 from wisnewe (sic) forgive the spelling
Donal Redish Elmogom@aol.Com
USA -

from belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org (Belarus SIG)
MY TRIP TO BELARUS

By MARCIA LOEB

On September 5, my brother and I set out on what we thought would be a trip
to Belarus in search of the towns where our mother had once lived. We did
not expect to find very much, as the country was almost completely destroyed
by the Nazis during World War II.
Yes, the country was destroyed, but the heart and soul of the people were not.

After spending three days in Minsk, and visiting the memorials of the
atrocities, spell bound, under the tutelage of our knowledgeable guide,
Galina Schwartz, we departed for our shtetl schlepping odyssey.
Our first stop was the village of Tolochin, where our mother lived until the
age of 12. When she resided there, there were 1300 Jews and only 500
non-Jews. There were 160 wooden houses, of which 110 belonged to Jews, and
there were three synagogues. That is how it was in 1907, when our mother
left for America.

Cut to 2001, and we, her children, are Americans, searching for our roots.
We had written in advance to the chairman (the equivalent of a mayor) of
Tolochin, and informed him of our visit, the purpose of which was to
discover as much as we could about our mother's early years in what was then
a part of Russia, called White Russia, as well as the history of the
Jewish people in the areas in which she lived.

Upon our arrival, we went to his office. He gave us a book (written in
Russian) of the history of the town, and then he told us that they were
opening the museum for us, which displayed the history of Tolochin. It was
normally closed on a Monday, the day that we were there. When we arrived
there, a delegation met us on the steps to the entrance, handed us flowers,
and the mayor said many people have left our town, but you two are the only
ones who have ever returned.

With tears still in our eyes, we were escorted inside. There we learned
about the village, from prehistoric times, through World War II. During the
second World War, called by the Belarussians _The Great Patriotic War, nine
thousand people were killed in that small village called Tolochin, three
fourths of them Jewish. Today there are 17 Jewish people in residence
there. There are no synagogues. There is a section of the museum devoted to
the daily lives of the Jewish people who lived there during last century,
and it displays some of their occupations, such as boot makers, weavers,
dressmakers, grocers, and peddlers.

We went on to visit the wooden houses in the community, and tried to imagine
that we found the one that our mother lived in. That is probably not
possible, as most of the town had been leveled, but as the styles had not
changed in a hundred years, we let our imaginations run freely. Even our
van driver was caught up in our game. In Russian, he would say very
excitedly that might be the one!
Next came a Russian lunch, which we ate in the private dining room of the
only restaurant in the town. The table was set as though for a banquet. We
had many courses, from soup to pudding.
The toasts given by our host were very touching, as translated by our guide.
To paraphrase one of them, he said he envied us that we were able to come to
this place to walk in the footsteps of our ancestors.
From there we visited the Jewish cemetery. The markers were partly Hebrew
and partly Belarussian. We placed stones from our mothe's grave in
Massachusetts on an unknown marker here in Tolochin.
The graves ranged in a time span from well over a hundred years ago to the
present time.

A visit to Oboltsi, a few miles away, was next on our agenda. This is where
our mother was born, and lived before the family moved to the larger village
of Tolochin. Here, too, the town chairman greeted us. She was a lovely
young woman, rather old-fashioned, who outdid our first host with her gifts
of flowers, candy, and a set of dishes! We could feel her happiness in our
visit by the expression in her eyes! I still get a lump in my throat when I
think of her joy as she made her presentations.
Oboltsi is smaller than Tolochin. It still has the dirt roads, which our
mother had described as being a quagmire in the spring when the snow melted,
and in that respect, nothing has changed. There were few automobiles, and
still many horse drawn wagons. Children played in the streets, and followed
us on their bicycles as we toured the area. Our SUV was quite a novelty.
Even the local police halted us, and asked for identification. The women
came out of their houses to wave to us, and to talk to us when we stopped
the car.Our next stop was very special. We returned to Tolochin, where we were
invited to have tea in the home of the oldest Jewish couple in the town.
Their names were Reya and Mikhail Mirkin, and they made the occasion very
festive. Mrs. Mirkin baked a delicious cake in her tiny kitchen, and served
it with pride. Mr. Mirkin brought out the vodka, and we toasted each other,
in our language and theirs. Their children have moved to Israel, and they
reveled in the chance to have visitors. Before we left, Mr. Mirkin went to
his bedroom, and changed his jacket. He returned to the living room, his
face was beaming, as he proudly wore all of his Soviet medals for us to
admire. By the time we said our farewells, we felt as though they were new
relatives.And then another emotional stop! We found the cemetery where our
grandmother was buried in the town of Smalavici. Our grandmother died when
our mother was 12 years of age, in 1908, and she often repeated the wish
that she could visit the place where her mother was buried. This was not
possible, during her lifetime, as Belarus was not open to visitors until the
break up of the Soviet Union. We were her _stand ins_in 2001. The head
stones were there, though most of them were no longer legible. Time and
weather had taken its toll. But it was a beautiful spot, in the woods, and
protected from invaders by the environment.

Before I continue to the next chapter of our visit, I must mention that we
spent two wonderful evenings in Minsk, one at the ballet, every bit as
wonderful as the Russian Kirov, and the other one at the opera, "The Barber
of Seville" sung in Belarussian. The tickets were $3.50 cents each in
American money. This is so that the citizens can enjoy the culture of their
country, as the wages are very low. For example, a teacher earns $30.00 a
month, and a doctor earns $50.00.

Away we flew, on September 11, to continue our emotional see saw in St.
Petersburg. There we were met at the airport by three generations of our
family, whom we had located via help from the Internet. The grandfather of
the oldest member of this family was the brother of our grandmother, our
mother_s mother. Thus we are second cousins. With her were her son, and
granddaughter, who corresponded in ages with our own families. They drove
us to our hotel. It was love at first sight! When we checked into our room
we turned on CNN. It was about 5 o'clock in the evening in Russia, and we
saw the second plane hit the World Trade Center!

We enjoyed our new found family. We spent 4 days of quality time with them,
and repressed our fears and worries. But our see saw is down, and as I write
this, I am safely home at last in Los Angeles, and my brother is in Boston.
I wonder if the balance on our seesaw will ever go up again?



.
USA -

WHAT IS A LITVAK?
by Saul Issroff


The following was in reply to a question posed by one of the members of
the JGS of Great Britain:- " My father was born in Libau (Courland) but
called himself a Litvak - what is a Litvak?":


Libau was part of Courland and is now part of Latvia.[1] Courlanders
(Kurlanders) were considered Litvaks (at least culturally). Hertz[2]
defines Litwaks (sic) as Jews from the Pale of settlement, especially
from the Vilna and Minsk Gubernias, who settled in Congress Poland at
the end of the 19th century. Many were under the influence of Russian
culture and language.

The Schoenbergs[3] define a Litvak as a Lithuanian Jew but qualify this
by stating that Jews from outside Lithuania may also be considered
Litvaks..."sources identify a number of mundane characteristics
contrasting Litvaks from other Ashkenazi Jews including Yiddish dialect
differences, culinary tastes and varying methods of food preparation".
They cite the practice of Litvaks in reciting Friday night Kiddush
sitting, and point out that when a Litvak prays he stands rock still and
only moves his lips. "However, these are outward manifestations of a
divergence of customs within the larger Ashkenazi Jewish community. In a
more general sense Litvaks are characterised as being more rational,
dogmatic and authoritarian than other branches of Ashkenazi Jewry".

They describe the origins of the Jews in the Baltic States and the
conflict that developed between the followers of the Vilna Gaon , the
Mitnagdim, (later known as the orthodox), meaning the opposers (of the
new emotional, anti-rational Hassidim). In 1784 the Gaon ruled that the
Hassidim were heretical, prohibited ritual slaughter performed by them
and marriage with them. The animosity between the groups was intense. It
was during this period of severe conflict that the term Litvak came into
being to differentiate the Lithuanian Jews from the remaining,
predominately Hassidic Jewish world of Eastern Europe.

The antipathy lessened in the 19th century as the Hassidic movement
began to establish Yeshivot of their own and to stress Torah education.
The traditional way of Jewish communities was to turn inwards, immersed
in their studies and being closer to God, but still part of the economic
world of the surrounding gentile town. This practice was challenged by
the Haskalah, the movement of enlightenment, which came to Lithuania
from the West, initially in Italy and Holland, moving through Germany
and took hold especially in Vilna (Vilnius) and Minsk.

These emancipated Jews looked upon themselves as a mediator between the
old rigid orthodoxy and the radical assimilationists. In Lithuania (with
traditions of reason and study) it centred on language and the people
rather than manifestations of assimilation and disavowal. Poets,
artists, scholars and politicians rapidly developed their interests. The
Haskalah movement opened up Lithuanian Jewry to the other new movements,
Zionism and Jewish Socialism. The Jewish Bundists played a major part in
the Russian Revolution.

After the third partition of Poland in December 23, 1791 the decree
limiting Jewish habitation to White Russia (Byelorus) and the Ukraine
was extended to include the newly acquired territories along the Baltic
Sea.

Thus began the Pale of Settlement that stretched from the Baltic Sea to
the Black Sea. Of the areas then inhabited by Lithuanian Jewry , ethnic
Lithuania and Byelorussia became an integral part of Russia. The
southern part, around Grodno and Suwalk became part of the Duchy of
Warshaw (Poland). So, although Lithuania may have become divided, the
Jewish Litvak community remained integrated until World War 1. At the
time of partition about a quarter of all Jews in eastern Europe were
Litvak. By 1923 153,000 Jews lived in Lithuania and about 90,000 in
Latvia, mainly of Litvak origin.

As is well known, many Litvaks emigrated to North and South America,
Great Britain, Australia and South Africa. The majority of those left
were killed in the Shoah. There are now under 4,000 Jews left in
Lithuania and about 15,000 in Latvia.

For a more detailed description refer to these recently published
books:- Greenbaum [4] and Levin [5]



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

REFERENCES

[1] Jacobson, Shelley. SHEMOT:Vol 1,4 p28-30
[2] Hertz,Alexander. THE JEWS IN POLISH CULTURE 1987 Northwestern
University Press Evanston Illinois
[3] Schoenberg, Stuart and Nancy. LITHUANIAN JEWISH COMMUNITIES 1991
Garland Publishing Company NY& London
[4] Greenbaum, Masha. THE JEWS OF LITHUANIA 1316-1945. Gefen Publishing
Jerusalem and New York 1995
[5] Levin, Dov. BALTIC JEWS UNDER THE SOVIETS 1940-1946. The Hebrew
University, Jerusalem 1994



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dec 13, 1995
Source: Originally appeared in SHEMOT VOL3 NO 3.
Provider: Saul Issroff


.
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God Bless
Christina Aguilera
USA -

C00L !!!
Pokemon
USA -

There is no single definition of the term Ecole de Paris, or School of Paris. It has varied with years in accordance with the writers who used it. Everybody seems to agree, however, that in the first decades of the 20th century, the name was used to describe a group of young adepts of modern art, of various styles and beliefs, who came from all over the world to live and work in Paris. A number of historians of art go further and limit the group to a score of renowned figures such as Marc Chagall, Chaim Soutine (married Rosa nee Bunimovich), Ossip Zadkine, Jacques Lipchitz, Modigliani, all foreigners, all Jews, and all born between 1880 and 1900. But what strikes us as Belarusians is the great number of members of the School of Paris who came from Belarus.
http://www.belarus-misc.org/diaspora/yurevich/belarus/artists/main.html
click to read the rest;
USA -

.
Lechovichers in the Ellis Island Database
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Our piece on 'Lechovichers in the Ellis Island Database' has now been posted by the Belarus SIG, with an evaluation which has been amplified by Neville Lamdan for the general reader. To go to it, use the following link: http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/lach_eidb.htm

Thanks again to Eilat Gordon and Neville Lamdan for their assistance in gathering and reviewing the information.

Gary Palgon, Atlanta, GA





Lechovichers in the Ellis Island Database click here
USA -

Davidson, Isidore born 25 Dec 1888 W in Vishnevo Russia (from draft list of WWI)
.
USA -

Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp June 21, 1909.
Zussmann, Schmuel M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniew .
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp April 03, 1907
Zubotkin, Jewel M 18y S Russia Hebrew Boisnow
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp April 03, 1906.
Zigmann, Chaim M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe
. Zigmann, Zipe F 55y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe
Manifest for Paris
Sailing from Le Havre October 20, 1923.
Zalb, Girsh M 17Y S Polish, Hebrew Wisniewe, Poland
Manifest for Mauretania
Sailing from Cherbourg February 02, 1923
. Zalb, Gerszon M 30y M Pinsk, Hebrew Wisnewo, Pinsk reg.
. Sznil, Ester F 19y S Pinsk, Hebrew Rakow, Pinsk Reg.
December 06, 1907
Manifest for Celtic
Sailing from Liverpool
. Zak, Leib M 40y M Russian Hebrew Wismowie
.
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Vagucky,Anton Wacznaw, Russia 1913 30y
Manifest for Nieuw Amsterdam May 22, 1906
Sailing from Rotterdam
. Waksman, Mordche M 31y M Russia, Hebrew Vuschinef
0003. Waksman, Schindel F 24y M Russia, Hebrew Vuschinef
. Waksman, Israel M 5m S Russia, Hebrew Vuschinef
. Waksman, Malke F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Vuschinef
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam July 20, 1902
Manifest for Birma
. Widlansky, Hama F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wo...snowo
. Wilensky, Benjamin M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Bicnow,
Manifest for Lituania
Sailing from Libau in Russia November 12, 1911
. Wilenska, Enta F 8y S Russia, Hebrew Bicnow, .
Wilensky, Benjamin M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Bicnow,
Wilensky, Jossif M 10y S Russia, Hebrew Bicnow
. Wilenska, Chaie-Rosa F 33y M Russia, Hebrew Bicnow, Russia
0019. Wilensky, Zalman M 7y S Russia, Hebrew Bicnow

Sailing from Liban July 20, 1910. . ,
Winer, Feige F 4y S Russia, Hebrew Wishnjowo .
Winer, Minka F 48y M Russia, Hebrew Wishnjowo, Russia
0015. Winer, Josel M 14y S Russia, Hebrew Wishnjowo, Russia
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp January 18, 1910.
Wincz, Mendel M 19y S Russia Hebrew Wisnowo
. Kremer, Salmen M 22y M Russia Hebrew Dolknien
. Schwerdlin, Abram M 10y S Russia, Hebrew Dulymew, Russia
0010. Schwerdlin, Ishmen M 3y S Russia Hebrew Dulymew, Russia
. Schwerdlin, Chaje Love F 30y M Russia Hebrew Dulymew, Russia
Manifest for Patricia
Sailing from Hamburg September 11, 1913
. Winkelmann, Fischel M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wyszanow
Manifest for Main
Sailing from Bremen August 14, 1913
. Waschinksa, Anna F 36y M Russia Hebrew Vicniew, Russia
. Waschinksa, Ludwig M 5y S Russia Hebrew Vicniew, Russia
0026. Waschinksa, Marianne F 4y S Russia Hebrew Vicniew, Russia
. Waschinksa, Franz M 9y S Russia Hebrew Vicniew, Russia
.
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Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp March 15, 1904. Taube, Chaje F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wysznewo . Eliszkewitz, Golde F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wysznewo
Manifest for Ryndam
Sailing from Rotterdam February 27, 1907.
Teiwisch, Mendel M 20y S Russia Hebrew Wesschenew
Manifest for Otavi
Sailing from Hamburg May 27, 1907.
Myllarz, Szizspan M 25y M Russia, Polish Wisniowa
. Tutak, Jan M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
. Petrowski, Stanisl M 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool March 24, 1906
. Tolak, Chaike F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
0029. Tolak, Gawrielle F 11m S Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
. Polak, Chaike M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Betschinew
.
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Manifest for Princess Irene
Sailing from Bremen January 03, 1908.
Sabotnik, Max M 20 S Russia-Hebrew Wisniowa
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp May 13, 1912
. Dewidson, Itte F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
. Sachs, Itte F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
. Rudnik, Judes F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
Manifest for Batavia
Sailing from Hamburg June 03, 1906.
Salb, Chaim M 39y M Russia, Hebrew Wuchnowa
. Saposchnik, Friwe M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wuchnowa
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp February 24, 1910.
Schischkin, Dwore F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wissmow
Manifest for Batavia
Sailing from Hamburg May 07, 1912
. Schaffer, Alte... M 30y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp July 05, 1905
. Abramson, Cholem M 23y S Russia - Hebrew Wiszerno
0018. Schreider, Jenny F 18y S Russia - Hebrew Wischnew
. Eliaspkiewitz, P. F 18y S Russia - Hebrew Wischnew
Manifest for Barbarossa
Sailing from Bremen June 09, 1904.
Schub, Ruve F 36y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewa
. Schub, Laser M 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewa
. Basidlo, Stanisl. M 22y S Russia, Polish Waschki
Manifest for Kursk
Sailing from Libau November 24, 1912.
Schuster, Chaim M 30y M Russia - Hebrew Bacanowa
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp March 08, 1910
. Schuster, Izchok M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznawa
. Botwinik, Alte F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowa, Russia
Manifest for Patricia
Sailing from Hamburg June 16, 1905
. Selmonwitz, Benjamin M 21y S Russian, Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Pisa
Sailing from Hamburg September 19, 1906
. Shofer, Abram M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wishnewo
Manifest for Amerika
Sailing from Cuxhaven February 20, 1906
. Slutzkin, Debora F 21y S Russian Hebrew Wochnow
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp July 20, 1913
. Smitkin, Schmul M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wiznewe, Russia
0003. Padwereshi, Minke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wiznewe
. Gurwitz, Mirhe F 40y M Russia, Hebrew Walhawish, Russia
0007. Gurwitz, Chasctrhe F 12y S Russia, Hebrew Walhawish, Russia
0010. Gurwitz, Leiser M 4y S Russia, Hebrew Walhawish, Russia
0011. Gurwitz, Chaihe F 10y S Russia, Hebrew Walhawish, Russia
. Gurwitz, Meier M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Walhawish
. Gurwitz, Janhel M 7y S Russia, Hebrew Walhawish, Russia Manifest for Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse
Sailing from Bremen July 21, 1908
. Starkman, Jojcheme M 34y M Russia - Hebrew Wasniow
Manifest for Barbarossa
Sailing from Bremen August 02, 1911
. Starkmann, Lea F 55y W Hebrew, Russia Wazniow
Manifest for Russia
Sailing from Libau September 11, 1910
. Strolis, Victoria F 25y S Russian, Hebrew Puschinowo
Manifest for Smolensk
Sailing from Libau November 30, 1907
. Susmann, Gdalie M 45y M Russian-Hebrew Wishneva, Wilna, Russia
Manifest for Moltke
Sailing from Hamburg September 30, 1904
. Sussmann, Aron M 17y S Russian (Hebrew) Wissnewo
Manifest for Barbarossa
Sailing from Bremen April 16, 1903
. Sussmann, Mojsche M 25y S Russia, Hebrew Wischniewo
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp May 08, 1906
. Sussmann, Theresie F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisinowo
. Davidson, Lehde F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisinowo
Manifest for Volturno
Sailing from Rotterdam December 28, 1909
. Swerdlik, Mottel M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowie, Russia
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp April 24, 1922
. Szasnowska, Chaja Sora F 15y S Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo
. Podbierezka, Rywa F 60y W Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo
./
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Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp January 08, 1923.
Rabinowicz, Leiba M 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Berengaria
Sailing from Southampton October 17, 1921.
Rabinowicz, Meyer-Meichel F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniewo
Manifest for Philadelphia
Sailing from Southampton November 26, 1904.
Rabinowitz, Broche F 26y W Russian/Hebrew Bessanava
Manifest for Moskwa
Sailing from Libau September 19, 1907
. Rabinowitz, Nechame F 35y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia
0005. Rabinowitz, Sosse F 8y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia
. Rabinowitz, Yossif M 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
. Rabinowitz, Simche M 10y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam September 18, 1905
. Rosenbaum, Leib M 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznov .
Jacker, Schewa F 19y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznov....
0018. Jacker, Meyer M 11m S Russia, Hebrew Telenestie
Manifest for Lituania
Sailing from March 20, 1909.
0014. R?senfeld, Ettle F 11m S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo,
. Rosenfeld, Elka F 25y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo
. Falb, Leike F 19y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo
Falb, Ester F 10y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno.
Falb, Marjasena F 47y M Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo .
Falb, Riwke F 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 28, 1908 .
Ruben, Sara F 16y S Russian, Hebrew Wischmeve
Manifest for Prinzess Alice
Sailing from Bremen July 25, 1907
. Rubin, Josef M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp May 13, 1912.
. Rudnik, Judes F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
Dewidson, Itte F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
0004. Sachs, Itte F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
.Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam September 05, 1905
Rudnik, Simche M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo .
Fleimer, Ite F 20y M Russia, Hebrew Wologin
. Fleimer, Schmul M 11m S Russia, Hebrew Wologin
Manifest for Livonia
Sailing from Liban March 26, 1907
. Rudnik, Simche M 26y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Imperator
Sailing from Hamburg July 15, 1914
. Rudzinski, Dawid M 53y M Russia Hebrew Bosnowe
.
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Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 13, 1921
. Milikowska, Dreiza F 35y W Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Szmul M 10y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Icek M 23y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg March 12, 1907
. Milikowsky, Riwke F 26y M Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
. Milikowsky, Mere F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Chemnitz
Sailing from Bremen March 03, 1906.
Midler, Hersch M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Voszemaw
Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg March 27, 1904
. Morgules, Israel M 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Mariam F 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0011. Morgules, Hanna F 13y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0012. Morgules, Rebeka F 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Ethel F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0013. Morgules, Moses M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0014. Morgules, Kajke F 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Berl F 2y 6m S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff .
. Sack, Shalom M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wilna
Kiwellowitz, Judes F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wilna
Manifest for Main
Sailing from Bremen June 16, 1910
. Padberesky, Zachre Female 18y Single Russia, Hebrew Wiszmowa going to brother in law
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 22, 1909
. Padborewski, Scheine F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo going to brother Benjamin Levine
. Goldstein, Chaje F 30y D Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo going to brother Benjamin Levine Mass.
. Goldstein, Malke F 3y 1m S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp December 27, 1905.
Padburesky, Etel F 17 S Russian Hebrew Wisnewe
0020. Shkluty, Leib M 17 S Russian Hebrew Wologyn
. Gur, Leheuie M 19 S Russian Hebrew Vuzuieo
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 08, 1905
. Pergick, Rischke F 20y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
0012. Pergick, Schleime M 19y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam October 10, 1905
. Perski, Dawid M 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewi
Manifest for Otavi
Sailing from Hamburg May 27, 1907
. Petrowski, Stanisl M 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa .
Tutak, Jan M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
. Myllarz, Szizspan M 25y M Russia, Polish Wisniowa
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp March 15, 1904.
Podbaresky, Freide F 30y M Russia Hebrew Warznewo
0002. Podbaresky, Liebe F 9y S Russia Hebrew Warznewo
0003. Podbaresky, Gtte F 3y S Russia Hebrew Warznewo
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 30, 1914.
Podbenski, Jankel M 35y M Russia, Hebrew Wismowa
Manifest for Ryndam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 17, 1921
. Podbereska, Ryfka F 55y W Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo, Poland going to son; Podbereski Szena in Brooklyn 88 16th St.
0013. Podbereska, Scheine F 16y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo
. Podbereska, Juda F 18y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo .
Podbereska, Ajzyk M 14y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo
Manifest for New York
Sailing from Southampton July 12, 1914
. Podbereski, Leibu M 50y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniewe
Manifest for Petersburg
Sailing from Libau June 13, 1907.
Podberesky, Itzko M 24 S Russia - Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp February 16, 1910
. Podberskkky, Taube F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove, Russia
0011. Lewin, Jente F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove
. Baran, Feide F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor .
Baran, Nechame F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor
Manifest for Adriatic
Sailing from Liverpool November 22, 1913.
Podbersky, Chaim M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa
. Podbersky, Israel M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa
Manifest for Blucher
Sailing from Hamburg August 21, 1904.
Podbiecacki, Jankel M 18y S Russian, Hebrew Wisneov
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp April 24, 1922
. Podbierezka, Rywa F 60y W Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo son Nathan Berst in 458 ocean Ave. Jersey City
. Szasnowska, Chaja Sora F 15y S Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo uncle Nathan Berst in Jersey City
.Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp . October 17, 1921
Podbierezki, Berko Ela M 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo .
Lejfer, Brucha F 21y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0019. Lejfer, Menla F 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
Lejfer, Cyrla F 42y M Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Polan.
. Lejfer, Matla F 19y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0003. Kaminski, Dawid M 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg January 08, 1910
. Podbiersky, Feige F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo,
. Bonemovitz, Ore M 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
Kaminski, Rachela F 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
Manifest for President Grant
Sailing from Hamburg December 20, 1907
. Podbiersky, Pinkus M 45y M Russia Hebrew Wiszniowa .
March 24, 1906 Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool
. Tolak, Chaike F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
. Pollak, Oize F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Rizineff
0015. Pollak, Yossel M 10m S Russia, Hebrew Rizineff
0029. Tolak, Gawrielle F 11m S Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
Polak, Chaike M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Betschinew
Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg March 31, 1910
. Posbiesky, Riwka F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischniawo
. Kriwecki, Fgnar M 26y S Russia, Russian Konniz, Russia
Manifest for Berengaria
Sailing from Cherbourg June 17, 1922
. Potasznik, Ziesa F 61y W Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam July 20, 1902
. Potster, Rische F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wo...snowo
. Widlansky, Hama F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wo...snowo .
Manifest for Amerika
Sailing from Hamburg September 14, 1907
Pozniak, Schimen M 8y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
0018. Pozniak, Anna F 6y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
0019. Pozniak, Schie M 3y6m S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo
. Pozniak, Bernie M 30y M Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam January 02, 1908
. Puchawicki, Sore F 9 S Russia-Hebrew Wishnewe, Russia
. Kotliar, Schimke F 19 S Russia-Hebrew Wistnewe, Russia
. Deptula, Josef M 17 S Russia-Polish Zabirze, Russia
.
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Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 13, 1921
. Milikowska, Dreiza F 35y W Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Szmul M 10y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Icek M 23y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg March 12, 1907
. Milikowsky, Riwke F 26y M Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
. Milikowsky, Mere F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Chemnitz
Sailing from Bremen March 03, 1906.
Midler, Hersch M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Voszemaw
Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg March 27, 1904
. Morgules, Israel M 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Mariam F 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0011. Morgules, Hanna F 13y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0012. Morgules, Rebeka F 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Ethel F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0013. Morgules, Moses M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0014. Morgules, Kajke F 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Berl F 2y 6m S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff .
. Sack, Shalom M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wilna
Kiwellowitz, Judes F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wilna
Manifest for Main
Sailing from Bremen June 16, 1910
. Padberesky, Zachre Female 18y Single Russia, Hebrew Wiszmowa going to brother in law
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 22, 1909
. Padborewski, Scheine F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo going to brother Benjamin Levine
. Goldstein, Chaje F 30y D Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo going to brother Benjamin Levine Mass.
. Goldstein, Malke F 3y 1m S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp December 27, 1905.
Padburesky, Etel F 17 S Russian Hebrew Wisnewe
0020. Shkluty, Leib M 17 S Russian Hebrew Wologyn
. Gur, Leheuie M 19 S Russian Hebrew Vuzuieo
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 08, 1905
. Pergick, Rischke F 20y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
0012. Pergick, Schleime M 19y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam October 10, 1905
. Perski, Dawid M 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewi
Manifest for Otavi
Sailing from Hamburg May 27, 1907
. Petrowski, Stanisl M 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa .
Tutak, Jan M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
. Myllarz, Szizspan M 25y M Russia, Polish Wisniowa
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp March 15, 1904.
Podbaresky, Freide F 30y M Russia Hebrew Warznewo
0002. Podbaresky, Liebe F 9y S Russia Hebrew Warznewo
0003. Podbaresky, Gtte F 3y S Russia Hebrew Warznewo
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 30, 1914.
Podbenski, Jankel M 35y M Russia, Hebrew Wismowa
Manifest for Ryndam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 17, 1921
. Podbereska, Ryfka F 55y W Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo, Poland going to son; Podbereski Szena in Brooklyn 88 16th St.
0013. Podbereska, Scheine F 16y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo
. Podbereska, Juda F 18y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo .
Podbereska, Ajzyk M 14y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo
Manifest for New York
Sailing from Southampton July 12, 1914
. Podbereski, Leibu M 50y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniewe
Manifest for Petersburg
Sailing from Libau June 13, 1907.
Podberesky, Itzko M 24 S Russia - Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp February 16, 1910
. Podberskkky, Taube F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove, Russia
0011. Lewin, Jente F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove
. Baran, Feide F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor .
Baran, Nechame F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor
Manifest for Adriatic
Sailing from Liverpool November 22, 1913.
Podbersky, Chaim M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa
. Podbersky, Israel M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa
Manifest for Blucher
Sailing from Hamburg August 21, 1904.
Podbiecacki, Jankel M 18y S Russian, Hebrew Wisneov
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp April 24, 1922
. Podbierezka, Rywa F 60y W Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo son Nathan Berst in 458 ocean Ave. Jersey City
. Szasnowska, Chaja Sora F 15y S Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo uncle Nathan Berst in Jersey City
.Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp . October 17, 1921
Podbierezki, Berko Ela M 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo .
Lejfer, Brucha F 21y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0019. Lejfer, Menla F 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
Lejfer, Cyrla F 42y M Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Polan.
. Lejfer, Matla F 19y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0003. Kaminski, Dawid M 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg January 08, 1910
. Podbiersky, Feige F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo,
. Bonemovitz, Ore M 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
Kaminski, Rachela F 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
Manifest for President Grant
Sailing from Hamburg December 20, 1907
. Podbiersky, Pinkus M 45y M Russia Hebrew Wiszniowa .
March 24, 1906 Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool
. Tolak, Chaike F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
. Pollak, Oize F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Rizineff
0015. Pollak, Yossel M 10m S Russia, Hebrew Rizineff
0029. Tolak, Gawrielle F 11m S Russia, Hebrew Botchinew
Polak, Chaike M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Betschinew
Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg March 31, 1910
. Posbiesky, Riwka F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischniawo
. Kriwecki, Fgnar M 26y S Russia, Russian Konniz, Russia
Manifest for Berengaria
Sailing from Cherbourg June 17, 1922
. Potasznik, Ziesa F 61y W Russian, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam July 20, 1902
. Potster, Rische F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wo...snowo
. Widlansky, Hama F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wo...snowo .
Manifest for Amerika
Sailing from Hamburg September 14, 1907
Pozniak, Schimen M 8y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
0018. Pozniak, Anna F 6y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
0019. Pozniak, Schie M 3y6m S Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo
. Pozniak, Bernie M 30y M Russia-Hebrew Wisnewo, Russia
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam January 02, 1908
. Puchawicki, Sore F 9 S Russia-Hebrew Wishnewe, Russia
. Kotliar, Schimke F 19 S Russia-Hebrew Wistnewe, Russia
. Deptula, Josef M 17 S Russia-Polish Zabirze, Russia
.
USA -

Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 13, 1921
. Milikowska, Dreiza F 35y W Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Szmul M 10y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
. Milikowska, Icek M 23y S Poland Hebrew Wiszniew
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg March 12, 1907
. Milikowsky, Riwke F 26y M Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
. Milikowsky, Mere F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Chemnitz
Sailing from Bremen March 03, 1906.
Midler, Hersch M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Voszemaw
Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg March 27, 1904
. Morgules, Israel M 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Mariam F 45y M Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0011. Morgules, Hanna F 13y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0012. Morgules, Rebeka F 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Ethel F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0013. Morgules, Moses M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
0014. Morgules, Kajke F 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff
. Morgules, Berl F 2y 6m S Russia, Hebrew Wishenoff .
. Sack, Shalom M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wilna
Kiwellowitz, Judes F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wilna
.
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Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp October 18, 1910.
Laschkewiez, Moische M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischneive
Manifest for Rotterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam November 09, 1904.
Laskowitz, Jankel M 23y S Russia Hebrew Wisnawa
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam May 29, 1906.
Laskowitz, Sosfe Lea F 23y S Russia, Hebrew Wysnewe
Manifest for Grosser Kurfuerst
Sailing from Bremen April 30, 1907
. Lederman, Chaskel M 48y M Russia, Hebrew Waszniow
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 01, 1913.
Leibman, Nockman M 42y M Russia, Hebrew Wozonowe
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp February 03, 1911.
Lewin, Isaak M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowa
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp February 16, 1910
. Baran, Feide F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor, Russia
. Baran, Nechame F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor
0010. Podberskkky, Taube F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove, Russia
0011. Lewin, Jente F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove
February 13, 1906 Manifest for Kaiser Wilhelm II
Sailing from Bremen
. Lewin, Malke F 23y M Russia, Hebrew Wiznowe
. Lewin, Mordche M 1m S Russia, Hebrew Wiznowe

.
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July 14, 1907 Manifest for Saratov
Sailing from Libau.
Kaplan, Boruch M 23y M Hebrew Wischnewo .
Manifest for Kronprinz Frederich Wilhelm
Sailing from Bremen June 22, 1914
Kaplan, Schage M 52y W Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
0011. Kaplan, Chaim M 13y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
0012. Kaplan, Kate F 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo
. Holiskewitz, Josef M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo
Manifest for Graf Waldersee
Sailing from Hamburg January 08, 1910
. Kaplan, Moische M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewv
Manifest for Mississippi
Sailing from Antwerp July 20, 1906
. Kaplan, Schimov M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischmew
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg March 06, 1904
. Kaplan, Selig M 21y S Russian Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp September 20, 1910.
Kaplan, Simche M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Rotterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam March 01, 1905
. Katz, Chaim M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Vischenew
. Katz, Moische M 15y S Russia, Hebrew Vischenew
. Rubin, Efraim M 22y S Russia, Hebrew Dolginow .
Altschuler, Mordche M 24y S Russia, Hebrew Hilejkar .
Kopelowitz, Joseph M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Hillejka
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 09, 1907.
. Katz, Chaje F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0026. Katz, Scheine F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0027. Katz, Hinde F 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0029. Schapira, Muschke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Walona
Dawidson, Sore F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe .
Becher, Ite F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp July 10, 1906
. Klein, Riwke M 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0024. Klein, Chaske F 5Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe
. Klein, Sosche F 31y M Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0022. Klein, Feiwel M 9Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe
. Goldschmid, Ischa F 26y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe
Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg. April 22, 1905
Kleinbaum, Pinchas M 25 M Russia Hebrew Wisznow
Manifest for Rhynland
Sailing from Antwerp April 15, 1903.
Klewansky, Sure F 20y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowa
. Klewansky, Cliaje F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowa
Manifest for Noordam
Sailing from Rotterdam March 04, 1910
. Kochen, Dobcie F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wuzinew
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp March 28, 1905
. Koflan, Moische M 17y S Russia-Hebrew Wisznowo
Manifest for Belgravia
Sailing from Hamburg July 01, 1904
. Koling, Monashe M 23y S Russian, Hebrew Vushineff
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp
. Kotliar, Justel M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
.
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Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam September 18, 1905.
Jacker, Schewa F 19y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznov....
0018. Jacker, Meyer M 11m S Russia, Hebrew Telenestie
. Rosenbaum, Leib M 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznov
Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool. June 11, 1910
Jacobson, Boruch M 32y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Russia
0023. Cohen, Chawe F 28y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
. Cohen, Schaje M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Barbarossa
Sailing from Breman July 08, 1907
. Jafim, Abram M 34y M Russia, Hebrew Wismowa
Manifest for President Lincoln
Sailing from Hamburg August 21, 1912
. Joffin, Abram M 38y M Russia Hebrew Wiecznowo
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp August 01, 1906

. Jaworek, Sore F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wiseanewo, Russia
0027. Jaworek, Michel M 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wiseanewo, Russia
. Jaworek, Hinde F 3y 6m S Russia, Hebrew Wiseanewo, Russia
. Jaworek, Feige F 6y S Russia, Hebrew Wiseanewo, Russia .
Jaworek, Jankel M 8y S Russia, Hebrew Wiseanewo, Russia
Manifest for Czar
Sailing from Libau March 27, 1914.
Jesel, Notka M 56y W Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp August 22, 1905.
Jigman, Etel F 15y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnaov .
Jigman, Mordene M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnaov
Manifest for Nieuw Amsterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam January 14, 1913
. Joches, Chaim M 18y S Russia Hebrew Wisnowo
.
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Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 12, 1913
Harwitz, Isze M 10y S Russian Hebrew Wisniwe, Russia
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp July 10, 1921.
Hecher, Fejvel M 39y M Polish, Hebrew Wismiowoe .
Hecher, Perla F 32y M Polish, Hebrew Wismiowoe
Manifest for George Washington
Sailing from Bremen July 02, 1911.
Hochman, Hirsh M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo
Manifest for Batavia
Sailing from Hamburg June 03, 1906
. Hochmann, Liebe F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowa
. Golub, Josip M 19y S Russian, Hebrew Wischmund .
Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg July 30, 1914
Hon, Taube F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Manifest for Kronprinz Frederich Wilhelm
Sailing from Bremen June 22, 1914.
Holiskewitz, Josef M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
. Kaplan, Schage M 52y W Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
0011. Kaplan, Chaim M 13y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia
0012. Kaplan, Kate F 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia

.
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manifest for Caronia
Sailing from Liverpool April 21, 1906
. Gerchenjon, Leibe M 55y M Russia, Hebrew Vischinew
. Gerchenjon, Rute F 50y M Russia, Hebrew Vischinew
Manifest for Patricia
Sailing from Hamburg July 27, 1905.
Geliskewitz, Schleime M 18y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnowa .
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp June 01, 1909
Geliaschkewicz, Dreise M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowie
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp November 29, 1920.
. Goldman, Etel F 64y W Polish, Hebrew Wismowe, Poland
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp July 10, 1906
.. July 10, 1906.
. Goldschmid, Ischa F 26y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus
. Klein, Sosche F 31y M Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe
Klein, Feiwel M 9Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
Klein, Riwke M 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
Klein, Chaske F 5Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp January 03, 1912
. Goldschmidtz, Schumel M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 22, 1909
. Goldstein, Chaje F 30y D Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
. Goldstein, Malke F 3y 1m S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo,
. Padborewski, Scheine F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Olympic
Sailing from Southampton February 07, 1923
. Golup, Perla F 29y M Poland-Hebrew Pinsk Region, Wasimaw, Poland
0017. Golup, Chaskiel M 26y M Poland-Hebrew Wasimaw, Poland
Manifest for Ryndam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 09, 1914
. Gorwitz, Marien M 40y M Russia,Hebrew Wisznowe, Russia .
Manifest for President Roosevelt
Sailing from Bremen December 20, 1923
Grafstein, Jermiasz M 41y M Poland, Hebrew Wasniow, Poland
0009. Grafstein, Abram-Rachwil M 14y S Poland, Hebrew Wasniow, Poland
.Manifest for Petersburg
Sailing from Liban December 27, 1906
Grimblatt, Tlzko M 23y S Russia Hebrew Wischnowo .
Grimblatt, Michel M 11m S Russia Hebrew Wischnowo
. Grimblatt, Tlzko M 23y S Russia Hebrew Wischnowo .
Grimblatt, Mowsche M 10y S Russia Hebrew Wischnowo
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp November 10, 1923
. Gurwicz, Chaja F 47 M Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo, Poland
. Gurwicz, Wichna F 10 S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo
. Gurwicz, Rachela F 9 S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo .
Gurwicz, Shisia M 17 S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Belgenland
Sailing from Antwerp November 03, 1923
. Gurwicz, Chaj-Sura F 47y M Polish, Hebrew Wyszniewo, Poland
. Gurwicz, Rachela F 9y S Polish, Hebrew Wyszniewo, Poland
. Gurwicz, Wichna F 10y S Polish, Hebrew Wyszniewo, Poland
. Gurwicz, Sionia F 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wyszniewo
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DI%3A%5C%5CT715%2D3407%5C%5CT715%2D34071214%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=600083040083&name=Chaj%2DSura%26nbsp%3BGurwicz&doa=November++03%2C+1923&port=Antwerp&line=0023
click for manifest
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Manifest for Lituania
Sailing from Libau March 20, 1909.
. Falb, Marjasena F 47y M Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno going to husband Ch. Falb in New York
Falb, Ester F 10y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno .
. Falb, Itke F 21y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
. Falb, Merke F 11y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
. Falb, Riwke F 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
. Falb, Leike F 19y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo
. Rosenfeld, Elka F 25y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
R?senfeld, Ettle F 11m S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam July 05, 1906.
. Feinberg, Chaje Sore F 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wischenew
Feigelewicz, Abram M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wileika
Manifest for Petersburg
Sailing from Libau October 03, 1907
. Feldman, Beile F 16y S Russia-Hebrew Wischnewo .
Ferber, Morits M 17y S Austria Hebrew Wisnewa
Manifest for Patricia
Sailing from Hamburg May 14, 1904
. Frolich, Hersch M 38y M Russian, Hebrew Wischniew
. Frohlich, Chane F 17y S Russian, Hebrew Wischniew
. Nadel, Blumen M 38y M Russian, Hebrew Wischnie
. Milmann, David M 26y S Russian, Hebrew Wischnen
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Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp November 22, 1904
. Eliaskewitz, Jipe F 33y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
. Eliaskewitz, Aron M 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
. Eliaskewitz, Benjamin M 7y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
. Eliaskewitz, Nochein M 9m S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Fredrich der Grosse
Sailing from Bremen August 23, 1904
. Eliaskiwes, Dawid M 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wischniewo
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp July 05, 1905
. Eliaspkiewitz, P. F 18y S Russia - Hebrew Wischnew going to uncle Lipman Aleshkewitz in Brooklyn.
Abramson, Cholem M 23y S Russia - Hebrew Wiszerno sailor going to cousin Davidson in New York.
Schreider, Jenny F 18y S Russia - Hebrew Wischnew going to brother.
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp March 08, 1910
. Eliskewicz, Schoje M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wischneive, Russia
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp March 15, 1904
. Eliszkewitz, Golde F 25y M Russia, Hebrew Wysznewo
Manifest for Noordland
Sailing from Antwerp April 10, 1906
. Epstein, Sore F 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe
. Aliskewitz, Reine F 10m S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe
. Aliskewitz, Malke F 25 M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe
Manifest for Campanello
Sailing from Rotterdam October 29, 1913.
Edwabsky, Taube F 27y M Russia Hebrew Bosinow,
Edwabsky, Mendsl M 2y S Russia Hebrew Bosinow .
Edwabsky, Mojse M 6y S Russia Hebrew Bosinow, Russia
Edwabsky, Basie F 4y S Russia Hebrew Bosinow

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Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg June 30, 1907
D'awidson, Mordche M 22y S Russia/Hebrew Wisenewo
Manifest for Bremen
Sailing from Bremen September 03, 1907.
Davidsoher, Moische M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniowo
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp May 08, 1906.
Davidson, Lehde F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisinowo
0016. Davidson, Lore F 44y M Russia, Hebrew Wilus
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp November 13, 1912.
Dawidsohn, Tenne Lea F 30y M Russia, Hebrew Wichnewe .
Dawidsohn, Riwe F 7y S Russia, Hebrew Wichnewe .
Dawidsohn, Chaje F 4y S Russia, Hebrew Wichnewe .
Schunokow, Jossel M 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wolozin
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp September 03, 1907.
Dawidsohn, Jacob M 17y S Russia Hebrew Wischnowa
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp February 12, 1913
. Dawidson, Nochem M 22y S Russia Hebrew Wisnowe .
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 09, 1907
Dawidson, Sore F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe .
Becher, Ite F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe .
Katz, Chaje F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0026. Katz, Scheine F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0027. Katz, Hinde F 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe
. Schapira, Muschke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Walona
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp May 13, 1912.
Dewidson, Itte F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe, Russia
Sachs, Itte F 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe
. Rudnik, Judes F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniowe
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp February 05, 1913.
Dinken, Scheime F 24y M Hebrew, Russia Wisnowo, Russia
0003. Dinken, Mirel F 3y S Hebrew, Russia Wisnowo
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp June 29, 1903
. Dudmacz, Jabel M 37y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo .
Manifest for Nieuw Amsterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam March 26, 1913
Dudman, Nissen M 19y S Russia/Hebrew Wischnewo
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DH%3A%5C%5CT715%2D2036%5C%5CT715%2D20361097%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=100584170378&name=Nissen%26nbsp%3BDudman&doa=March+++++26%2C+1913&port=Rotterdam&line=0018
click for the original manifest of Dudman
USA -

Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp August 15, 1911.
Centnerschwer, Riwke F 55y W Russia, Hebrew Wischnawe, Russia
Alperowicz, Scheine F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnawe, Russia
Manifest for George Washington
Sailing from Bremen December 22, 1913
Cesne, Golde F 23y S Hebrew Wiszniow .
Chesne, Ellie M 19y S Hebrew Wiszmevo, Russia
Manifest for Majestic
Sailing from Cherbourg July 10, 1923.
Czesna, Chaja F 18y S Polish Hebrew Wiszniavo .
Czesna, Mina F 62y W Polish Hebrew Wiszniavo
Manifest for Campania
Sailing from Liverpool June 11, 1910.
Cohen, Schaje M 5y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Cohen, Chawe F 28y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo
Jacobson, Boruch M 32y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DG%3A%5C%5CT715%2D1497%5C%5CT715%2D14971075%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=101367100151&name=Schaje%26nbsp%3BCohen&doa=June++++++11%2C+1910&port=Liverpool&line=0024
click for the original manifest of the Cohens from Wishnewo
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Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp January 18, 1905;
. Badanowsky, Moische M 17y S Russia-Hebrew Wisnowo
Manifest for Nieuw Amsterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam June 25, 1907.
Badenowsky, Riwke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowy
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg December 18, 1905
Barran, Moische M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 09, 1907
. Becher, Ite F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
. Katz, Chaje F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
. Katz, Scheine F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
. Katz, Hinde F 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
. Dawidson, Sore F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
Manifest for Rhein
Sailing from Bremen March 11, 1911.
Beker, Schaj Selig M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniawa
Manifest for Rotterdam
Sailing from Rotterdam September 30, 1921.
. Berkman, Rachel F 39y M U.S.A. Albany, N.Y. with sons;
Berkman, Gdalde M 17y S Poland, Hebrew Wiszniewo, Poland going to father Sam Berkman in Albany
. Berkman, Cipe F 15y S Poland, Hebrew Wiszniewo, Poland Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 14, 1903.
Bergmann, Sore F 21y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo going to father D. Bergman on west Broadway, New York.
Bergmann, Riwke F 14y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo going to father D. Bergman on west Broadway, New York.
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp September 23, 1922;
. Berkman, Jankel Symcha M 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg
. Berkman, Chjena F 19y S Polish, Hebrew Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg . Berkman,
.Manifest for Estonia
Sailing from Libau June 22, 1910;
Berkman, Selik M 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Russia
Dweire F 23y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnero, Russia
Manifest for Friesland
Sailing from Antwerp September 02, 1902
. Berkmann, Berzik M 18y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewo
Manifest for Kherson
Sailing from Libau December 13, 1907
Berkmann, Jztko M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnow, Wilna
Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg
January 16, 1907
. Berkmann, Schaie M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewa
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp July 02, 1912.
Berkmann, Slemul M 37y M Russia - Hebrew Wiznowe, Russia
Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 12, 1905
Bermann, Mordche M 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnewo
Zalaja, Alexander M 20y S Russia, Polish Waschnewa
Manifest for Albano
Sailing from Hamburg December 22, 1903
Blacher, Kalmen M 21y S Russian Hebrew Wischnewa .
Manifest for Aquitania
Sailing from Cherbourg March 17, 1922
Blacher-Block, Sara F 12y S Poland, Hebrew Wismova, Poland
Blacher-Block, Eliash M 13 S Poland, Hebrew Wismova, Poland
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 18, 1905
. Blecher, Lea F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo
. Blecher, Chaje F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisznewo
January 08, 1910
. Bonemovitz, Ore M 11y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia going to uncle Itzig Podbiersky
. Podbiersky, Feige F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowo, Russia going to uncle Itzig Podbiersky
Manifest for Konigen Luise
Sailing from Bremen February 27, 1903.
Botwinik, Aisik M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo
Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp March 08, 1910
. Botwinik, Alte F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnowa, Russia
Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp February 04, 1914.
Botwink, Aron M 50y M Russia, Hebrew Wisznowe
Manifest for Lituania
Sailing from Libau August 27, 1911.
. Bunimowicz, Feige F 43y M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Russia going to husband Y. Bunimowicz, c/o A. brothers 92 Canal Street, New York
Bunimowicz, Aron M 7y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Russia
. Bunimowicz, Gawriel M 15y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewo, Russia
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Manifest for Main Name----- Gender Age Married Ethnicity Place of Residence
Sailing from Bremen; Aleschkiewitz,Schaie M 18y Wisnewo,Russia, Hebrew, Russia June 16, 1910 going to uncle ? Alashkewitz?, Brooklyn
Manifest for Noordland
Sailing from Antwerp April 10, 1906;
Aliskewitz, Malke F 25 M Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe going to husband; A. J. Aleshkevitz 103 Hester Street, New York.
Aliskewitz, Reine F 10m S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe going to father ; A. J. Aleshkevitz 103 Hester Street, New York.
Epstein, Sore F 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnewe sister (in law?) of A. J. Aleshkevitz 103 Hester Street, New York.
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp August 15, 1911;.
Alperowicz, Scheine F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnawe, Russia going to brother in Brooklyn
Centnerschwer, Riwke F 55y W Russia, Hebrew Wischnawe, Russia going to son in Cleveland 31 E. 91 St.
Manifest for Cambroman
Sailing from Antwerp November 24, 1907
. Arsham, Berle F 21y S Hebrew - Russian Wiznowiee, Russia
. Arsham, Gasher M 26y S German - Russian Wiznowiee, Russia .
Manifest for Breslau
Sailing from Bremen April 06, 1907
Askewioz(Aleshkewitz), Rode F 23y S Russia Hebrew Wisuniawa, Russia http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DG%3A%5C%5CT715%2D0862%5C%5CT715%2D08620109%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=103229020213&name=Rode%26nbsp%3BAskewioz&doa=April+++++06%2C+1907&port=Bremen&line=0026
click for Rode original manifest
USA -

To all ,
I have just returned from Lithuania. I worked for one week in the National
Archives. In a very friendly ambiance, with lot of help from the employees. Even we (Belorussian group), lot of the documents can be found for us in Vilnius. This part ( western Belarus) was Polish up to 1795 and from 1922 to 1939.
The town Vilnius was the district center and had a University since XVII century:Uniwersytet Stefana Batorego. As my father was from Nowogrodek, he
studied medicine in Wilno from 1928 to 1935. The entire (?) archives of the University are there.
Many other documents concerning Belarus could be also found there.
I will give you some information from their publication:
files 70,1084: election to Polish Sejm.
files 51, ...: local administation, many of them from to-days Belorusia.

files 120...: army documents
files 126...: justice
files 172...: schools,
etc.
Many of them concern the Jewish organisations.
Attention: file 287 has 68 units and concerns IWO in Wilno: 1904-1938.

The adress is:
Lietuvos Centrinis Valstybinis Archyvas (LCVA)
2016 Vilnius, gatve O.Milasiaus 21
phone: + 370 2 764718.

I used the Polish language, but they speak also English or French. They speak but don't like Russian.
All the documents I looked were in Polish as they concerned the period when Wilno belonged to Poland.
In compression with the working conditions in Belarus (I worked in 2 archives; Grodno and Minsk) they are much, much better in Vilnius. The work in place is free of charge, the Xerox copies are 24cents/A4
(210x297mm) up to 2,5$ for abt. 1 square meter.
Many European citizens don't need the visa. The hotel, restauranta conditions can be compared to a normal Western standards. Air communication from many towns. Sleeping car train from Warsaw 10 hours, arriving at 8am.
Please fill free to ask me for the general questions, but not about the details as they have 2,750,076 documents.
Searching: LIMON, DELATYCKI, KAPLINSKI, MACZYNSKI, GIERASIMOWICZ from
Slonim, Nowogrodek, Lida
Best wishes
Henryk Limon limon@EIG.UNIGE.CH
Geneva, Switzerland -

Kaplan,Boruch Wischnewo, Russia 1907 23y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
45 Kaplan,Boruch Wischnervo, Russia 1907 28y
Kaplan,Chaim Wischnowo, Russia 1914 13y
Kaplan,Chaje Wischerewo, Russia 1914 17y
Kaplan,Dwoire Wiszeno, Wilna 1905 16y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
53 Kaplan,Dwoire Wischnews, Russia 1910 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
54 Kaplan,Eisick Wischewa 1903 45y
Kaplan,Itrko Wiscknewo 1904 12y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
59 Kaplan,Kate Wischnowo, Russia 1914 11y
64 Kaplan,Mina Wischerewo, Russia 1914 23y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
65 Kaplan,Mine Wiscknewo 1904 15y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
66 Kaplan,Moische Wischnewv, Russia 1910 21y
72 Kaplan,Schage Wischnowo, Russia 1914 52y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
73 Kaplan,Schaje Wiscknewo 1904 52y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
74 Kaplan,Schimov Wischmew, Russia 1906 17y
Kaplan,Selig Wischnewa 1904 21y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
77 Kaplan,Selik Wiscknewo 1904 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
78 Kaplan,Simche Wisnowo, Russia 1910 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
79 Kaplan,Sime Wischnowa 1906 22y
Katz,Chaje Wisnowe, Russia 1907 27y
Katz,Hinde Wisnowe, Russia 1907 2y
Katz,Scheine Wisnowe, Russia 1907 3y
Klein,Chaske Wisznewe, Rus. 1906 5Y
. Klein, Sosche F 31y M Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0022. Klein, Feiwel M 9Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0023. Klein, Riwke M 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0024. Klein, Chaske F 5Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0025. Goldschmid, Ischa F 26y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe
160 Kleinbaum,Pinchas Wisznow 1905 25
Klewansky,Cliaje Wisnowa 1903 3y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
174 Klewansky,Sure Wisnowa 1903 20y
Koflan,Moische Wisznowo 1905 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
191 Kohn,Abram Wisnch 1905 6m
Kotliar,Justel Wisnowo, Russia 1907 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
252 Kotliar,Schimke Wistnewe, Russia 1908 19 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
253 Kottliar,Zipe Wisniver 1904 16y
Kunstler,Salomon Wisznow 1899 14y
Kuperstock,Roselike Wisekniwe, Russia 1913 9y
. Kuperstock, Choue Rueh F 48y W Russia Hebrew Wisekniwe, Russia
0013. Kuperstock, Menachem M 14y S Russia Hebrew Wisekniwe,

Lisman,Abram Wishowo 1905 16y
Laskowitz,Jankel Wisnawa 1904 23y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
34 Laskowitz,Scheine Riwke Wischuewo, Russ. 1912 18y
Lehrer,Maritz Wiszinowa, Galizin 1914 21y
Letzter,Abraham Wiske Neve, Poland 1921 14y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
81 Letzter,Chawa Wiske Neve, Poland 1921 37y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
82 Letzter,Szmul Wiske Neve, Poland 1921 11y
Lewhowicz,Beile Wiszhower, Russia 1908 3 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
91 Lewhowicz,Ester Wiszhower, Russia 1908 2 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
92 Lewhowicz,Marian Wiszhower, Russia 1908 28 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
93 Lewin,Abram Wisne
Lewin,Fanny Wisseje, Russia 1908 31y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
95 Lewin,Isaak Wisniowa, Russia 1911 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
96 Lewin,Jente Wischnove, Russia 1910 18y
Lewkowitz,Aron Wishkowo, Poland 1921 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
109 Lewkowitz,Enta Wishkowo, Poland 1921 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
110 Lewkowitz,Mariam Wishkowo, Poland 1921 51y
Limmerman,Abram Wischlcowe, Russia 1912 9y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
132 Limmerman,Caube Wischlcowe, Russia 1912 13y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest Lisman,Abram Wishowo 1905 16y
133 Limmerman,Ettel Wischlcowe, Russia 1912 38y

Milikowska,Dreiza Wiszniew, Poland 1921 35y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
130 Milikowska,Icek Wiszniew, Poland 1921 23y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
131 Milikowska,Szmul Wiszniew, Poland 1921 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
132 Milikowsky,Mere Wiszniewo 1907 3y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
133 Milikowsky,Riwke Wiszniewo 1907 26y
Molina,Beile Wischkowo, Russia 1914 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
147 Molina,Welfel Wischkowo, Russia 1914 20y
Morgules,Berl Wishenoff 1904 2y 6m Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
160 Morgules,Ethel Wishenoff 1904 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
161 Morgules,Hanna Wishenoff 1904 13y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
162 Morgules,Israel Wishenoff 1904 45y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
Laskowitz,Jankel Wisnawa 1904 23y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
34 Laskowitz,Scheine Riwke Wischuewo, Russ. 1912 18y
Lehrer,Maritz Wiszinowa, Galizin 1914 21y
163 Morgules,Kajke Wishenoff 1904 5y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
164 Morgules,Mariam Wishenoff 1904 45y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
165 Morgules,Moses Wishenoff 1904 5y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
166 Morgules,Rebeka Wishenoff 1904 9y
Mutzkovsky,Abram Wisno, Russia 1914 35y
Mayerowicz,Shmul Wisgniewo, Russia 1913 19y
Margalis,Schulim Wischnowitz, Russia 1912 34y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
52 Margolis,Dwoive Wiskow, Russia 1911 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
53 Margulies,Rubin Wisniowczyk, Austria 1909 19y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
54 Margulis,Ajzyk Wisniawice, Poland 1920 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
55 Margulis,Aschel Wisniowitz, Russia 1912 2y 6m Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
56 Margulis,Herschl Wisniowitz, Russia 1912 3y 6m Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
57 Margulis,Keile Wisniowitz, Russia 1912 30y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
58 Margulis,Szemla Wisniawice, Poland 1920 20y



3 Neuman,Sehlaime Wishowa, Russia 1912 25y Nadel,Blumen Wischnie... 1904 38y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
3 Naiman,Mariase Wisne, Russia 1910 17y
11 Nedwstzky,Sibenidel Wisikowo, Russia 1912 17y
27 Nichtberger,Wilhelm Wiszniawa, Galicia 1911 17y Norwintz,Mersch Chaim Wischkowa, Russia 1912 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
43 Nowgorod,Abraham Wischkow, Poland 1921 16y

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"One Step" Ellis Island Search Results for Jewish Passengers from Vishnevo;
Padberesky,Zachre Wiszmowa, Russia 1910 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
2 Padborewski,Scheine Wisnowo, Russia 1909 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
3 Padborovsky,Schmiel Wischniesov, Russia 1910 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
4 Padburesky,Etel Wisnewe 1905 17
Pergick,Rischke Wischnewo 1905 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
41 Pergick,Schleime Wischnewo 1905 19y
Perski,Dawid Wisznewi 1905 16y
Petrowski,Stanisl Wisniowa 1907 33y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
54 Petruszka,Ojzer Wisnowra, Poland 1921 17y
Podbenski,Jankel Wismowa, Russia 1914 35y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
83 Podbereska,Ajzyk Wisniewo, Poland 1921 14y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
84 Podbereska,Juda Wisniewo, Poland 1921 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
85 Podbereska,Ryfka Wisniewo, Poland 1921
Podbereska,Scheine Wisniewo, Poland 1921 16y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
87 Podbereski,Leibu Wisniewe, Russia 1914 50y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
88 Podberesky,Itzko Wischnewa 1907 24 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
89 Podberewski,Fegel Wisniewt, Russia 1909 18y
Podberskkky,Taube Wischnove, Russia 1910 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
91 Podbiecacki,Jankel Wisneov 1904 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
92 Podbierezka,Rywa Wiszniewo, Russia 1922 60y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
93 Podbierezki,Berko Ela Wiszniewo, Poland 1921 16y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
94 Podbiersky,Feige Wischnowo, Russia 1910 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
95 Podbiersky,Pinkus Wiszniowa, Russia 1907 45y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
96 Podbireski,Chaie Wismirel, Russia 1912 18y Passenger
Posbiesky,Riwka Wischniawo, Russia 1910 18y
Potasznik,Ziesa Wiszniewo, Russia 1922 61y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
119 Potocsgnik,Lisa Wiszwiawa, Russia 1910 18y
Pozniak,Anna Wisnewo, Russia 1907 6y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
125 Pozniak,Bernie Wisnewo, Russia 1907 30y
Pozniak,Schie Wisnewo, Russia 1907 3y6m Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
127 Pozniak,Schimen Wisnewo, Russia 1907 8y
Puchawicki,Sore Wishnewe, Russia 1908 9 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
148 Pzitinsy,Chaje Wiskowa, Russia 1906 5y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
149 Pzitinsy,Chane Wiskowa, Russia 1906 25y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
150 Pzitinsy,Moische Wiskowa, Russia 1906 3y

Manifest for Lituania Pzitinsy,Srul Wiskowa, Russia 1906 7y
Sailing from Libau March 20, 1909
R?senfeld,Ettle Wisnewo, Wilno 1909 11m
. Falb, Marjasena F 47y M Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0008. Rosenfeld, Elka F 25y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0009. Falb, Itke F 21y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0010. Falb, Leike F 19y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0011. Falb, Merke F 11y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0012. Falb, Ester F 10y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
0013. Falb, Riwke F 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisnewo, Wilno
Rabinowicz,Leiba Wiszniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1923 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
8 Rabinowicz,Meyer-Meichel Wisniewo, Russia 1921 17y
Rabinowitz,Nechame Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 35y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
16 Rabinowitz,Simche Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
17 Rabinowitz,Sosse Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 8y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
18 Rabinowitz,Yossif Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 3y
Rosenfeld,Elka Wisnewo, Wilno 1909 25y
Rubin,Josef Wisniowa, Russia 1907 20y
Rudnik,Judes Wisniowe, Russia 1912 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
218 Rudnik,Simche Wisznewo 1905 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
219 Rudnik,Simche Wischnewo 1907 26y

Sabotnik,Max Wisniowa, Russia 1908 20 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
2 Sabotniki,Mordche Wisznilwo, Russia 1907 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
3 Sachs,Itte Wisniowe, Russia 1912 19y
Sabotnik,Max Wisniowa, Russia 1908 20 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
2 Sabotniki,Mordche Wisznilwo, Russia 1907 20y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
3 Sachs,Itte Wisniowe, Russia 1912 19y
Schaffer,Alte... Wischnewo, Russia 1912 30y
Schklar,Chaje Wisckedwo, Russia 1910 35 y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
115 Schklar,Feige Wisckedwo, Russia 1910 4 y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
116 Schklar,Ruchel Wisckedwo, Russia 1910 11 y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
117 Schklar,Wolf Wisckedwo, Russia 1910 8 y
Schreider,Jenny Wischnew 1905 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
149 Schub,Laser Wischnewa 1904 16y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
150 Schub,Ruve Wischnewa 1904 36y
Schuster,Izchok Wisznawa, Russia 1910 18y
Schwartz,Feiga Wishaniow, Calicia 1921 22y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
168 Schwartz,Israel Wishaniow, Calicia 1921 25y
Schwartzberg,Gele Wishewo, Russia 1913 18y
Shofer,Abram Wishnewo 1906 20y
Siltmann,Hersch Wischkowo 1904 33y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
243 Silver,Ethe Wiskowa 1904 13y
Sinsonowitz,Chane Wischkew, Russia 1908 38y
Sklut,Neime Wisnieco 1907 18y
Smith,Nochim Wisdunewe, Russia 1906 18y
Tesler,Josef Wisniewce, Poland 1920 22y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
29 Tesler,Moses Wisniewce, Poland 1920 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
30 Tesler,Salamon Wisniewce, Poland 1920 18y
Tutak,Jan Wisniowa 1907 18y
Uschitzky,Ely Wiszhia, Russia 1910 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
3 Uskolowskaja,Sore Wisny 1913 21y
Smith,Nochim Wisdunewe, Russia 1906 18y
Susmann,Gdalie Wishneva, Wilna, Russia 1907 45y
Sussmann,Aron Wissnewo 1904 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
419 Sussmann,Mojsche Wischniewo 1903 25y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
420 Sussmann,Theresie Wisinowo 1906 18y
Swerdlik,Mottel Wisnowie, Russia 1909 19y
Szasnowska,Chaja Sora Wiszniewo, Russia 1922 15y
Szuster,Abram Wismievice, Poland 1920 15y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
443 Szuster,Josef Wismievice, Poland 1920 21 Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
444 Szuster,Ruchel Wismievice, Poland 1920 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
445 Szuster,Sura Wismievice, Poland 1920 22y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
446 Szuster,Syma Wismievice, Poland 1920 55y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
447 Szwarcberg,Chana Wisniowce, Poland 1921 10y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
448 Szwarcberg,Frejda Wisniowce, Poland 1921 51y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
449 Szwarcberg,Jankiel Wisniowce, Poland 1921 17y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
450 Szwarcberg,Jechil Wisniowce, Poland 1921 18y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest

Szwarcberg,Mirla Wisniowce, Poland 1921 13y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
452 Szwarcberg,Szija Wisniowce, Poland 1921 12y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
453 Szwarcberg,Zelda Wisniowce, Poland 1921 30y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
454 Szychmann,Chaja Wisniawic, Poland 1920 36y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
455 Szychmann,Fejga Wisniawiec, Poland 1920 13y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
456 Szychmann,Lejbus Wisniawiec, Poland 1920 10y

Wincz,Mendel Wisnowo, Russia 1910 19y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
107 Winer,Feige Wishnjowo, Russia 1910 4y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
108 Winer,Josel Wishnjowo, Russia 1910 14y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
109 Winer,Minka Wishnjowo, Russia 1910
Wizhniewzka,Stanislawa Wiskowo, Russia 1910 32y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
124 Wizhniewzka,Witold Wishowo, Russia 1910 14y

Zalb,Gerszon Wisnewo, Pinsk reg. 1923 30y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
8 Zalb,Girsh Wisniewe, Poland 1923 17Y
Zigmann,Chaim Wischnewe 1906 9y Passenger Record Text Manifest Scanned Manifest
22 Zigmann,Zipe Wischnewe 1906 55y
Zussmann,Schmuel Wisniew, Russia 1909 18y
Zucherman,Feige Wiszeny, Russia 1907 19y
.
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Subj: [belarus] Help!!: Jewish Historical Research In Vilnius
Date: 8/2/01 10:29:08 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: rabinowitz@juno.com (Cllifford L Karchmer)
To: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org (Belarus SIG)
CC: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org
A relative will be traveling to Vilnius shortly and wants to conduct some family research. I have some questions which I hope to answer so that he can complete the research while there.

1. My ancestors lived in Vishnevo, Oshmiany, and Devenishkes--all in the
Oshmiany uezd but two of the towns are in Belarus today. Will the Vishnevo and Oshmiany records be in
the Lithuanian State Archives?

2. We want to find the birth, marriage, and death records of two ancestors, Nathan Rabinowitz and his wife Rachel, who lived from about 1799-1896. Do we go to the Lithuanian State Archives for all information, or is there a separate archive for marriage and non-vital
records?

3. Can the request for records, archives search, and receipt of
records--all be done in one day, and how long does it take
(approximately)?

4. What language will the records be in, and are there translators
available through the state archives, or does one have to hire one's own?

5. What is the cost for copies (Xerox) of birth, death, and marriage
records?

6. Anything else we should know or tips you would give us?

Many thanks for this help.

Regards,

Cliff Karchmer
(Oshmiany Research Group)
Researching: Rabinowitz, Karchmer, Milner, and Davidson,
from Vilna, Oshmiany, Vishnevo,Devenishkes, Alytus, Lipnishkes, and Olkenik


------
-

330. Berko Ela Podbierezki Wiszniewo, Poland 1921 16
331. Brejza Podbierezka Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 17
332. Jenta Podbierezka Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 38
333. Jser Podbierezki Traby, Poland 1922 15
334. Rywa Podbierezka Wiszniewo, Russia 1922 60
335. Sara Podbierezka Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 7
336. Rywka Podbierski Smorgon, Lithuan. 1920 21
337. Feige Podbiersky Wischnowo, Russia 1910 20
338. Pinkus Podbiersky Wiszniowa, Russia 1907 45
339. Josef Podbietak Lomd..., Russia 1911 35
340. Helene Podbilenak 1893 19
341. Wladislaus Podbilenak 1893 15
342. Abram Podbilewicz Wonsow 1905 22
343. Ester Podbilewiz Wonsowa, Russia

.
USA -

.Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp February 16, 1910
Podberskkky, Taube F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove, Russia
0011. Lewin, Jente F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnove
. Baran, Nechame F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor, Russia
0008. Baran, Feide F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Wischnor
Manifest for Adriatic
Sailing from Liverpool November 22, 1913
. Podbersky, Chaim M 9y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa, Wilna going to brother in law Abe Yankus? 237 ,, Boston, Mass
0008. Podbersky, Israel M 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wesznefa, Wilna
Manifest for Blucher
Sailing from Hamburg August 21, 1904
. Podbiecacki, Jankel M 18y S Russian, Hebrew Wisneov
Manifest for Brandenburg
Sailing from Bremen December 26, 1910
. Podbielewicz, Levy M 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wonsowo, Russia
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from AntwerpManifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp October 17, 1921
. Podbierezki, Berko Ela M 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniewo, Poland going to father Jacob Podbieresky, Fallsburg, New York
. Lejfer, Cyrla F 42y M Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0017. Lejfer, Brucha F 21y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0018. Lejfer, Matla F 19y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
0019. Lejfer, Menla F 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolczyn, Poland
. Kaminski, Dawid M 17y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
0004. Kaminski, Rachela F 16y S Polish, Hebrew Wolozyn, Poland
.http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DI%3A%5C%5CT715%2D3037%5C%5CT715%2D30370744%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=100047060233&name=Berko+Ela%26nbsp%3BPodbierezki&doa=October+++17%2C+1921&port=Antwerp&line=0007


original manifest
USA -

.Manifest for Vaderland
Sailing from Antwerp
June 24, 1913
Podberezka, Merke F 17y S Russian Hebrew Wichneiwo, Russia going to uncle; Liberman in Brooklyn, 344 Lowel Street. http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DH%3A%5C%5CT715%2D2114%5C%5CT715%2D21140732%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=103292080097&name=Merke%26nbsp%3BPodberezka&doa=June++++++24%2C+1913&port=Antwerp&line=0007
click for the original manifest
USA -

Podberewski, Fegel F 18y S Russia, Hebrew Wisniew, Russia Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp February 03, 1909
.
USA -

Podberesky, Rasche F 41y M Russia-Hebrew Woloshin, Russia GOING TO HUSBAND B. Podberesky 368 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK
0020. Padberesky, Chaie-Zipe F 11y S Russia-Hebrew Woloshin, Russia
0021. Podberesky, Sora-Matle F 10y S Russia-Hebrew Woloshin,
Date of Arrival Port of Departure Line #
Page # 128
Podberesky, Rasche September 16, 1912 Libau, Russia
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DH%3A%5C%5CT715%2D1934%5C%5CT715%2D19340139%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=100986130107&name=Rasche%26nbsp%3BPodberesky&doa=September+16%2C+1912&port=Libau%2C+Russia&line=0019
.
USA -

Podbereski, Leibu M 50y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniewe
Manifest for New York
Sailing from Southampton July 12, 1914.
Podberesky, Itzko M 24 S Russia - Hebrew Wischnewa
S Manifest for Petersburg
Sailing from Libau June 13, 1907
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DG%3A%5C%5CT715%2D0919%5C%5CT715%2D09190363%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=101998110114&name=Itzko%26nbsp%3BPodberesky&doa=June++++++13%2C+1907&port=Libau&line=0024
ORIGINAL MANIFEST
USA -

Manifest for Frankfurt
Sailing from Bremen December 30, 1910
Podbereski, Aron M 17y S Russia WisnioWa http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DG%3A%5C%5CT715%2D1614%5C%5CT715%2D16140009%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=101500180104&name=Aron%26nbsp%3BPodbereski&doa=December++30%2C+1910&port=Bremen&line=0029
CLICK FOR THE ORIGINAL MANIFEST
USA -

Manifest for Ryndam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 17, 1921
. Podbereska, Ryfka F 55y W Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo, Poland going to son ; SZENA (SPEN...) PODBERESKI
88 16TH STREET, BROOKLYN
0012. Podbereska, Juda F 18y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo, Poland
0013. Podbereska, Scheine F 16y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo, Poland
0014. Podbereska, Ajzyk M 14y S Poland, Hebrew Wisniewo
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DI%3A%5C%5CT715%2D2952%5C%5CT715%2D29520455%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=100167070151&name=Ajzyk%26nbsp%3BPodbereska&doa=April+++++17%2C+1921&port=Rotterdam&line=0014
Manifest for New York
Sailing from Southampton July 12, 1914
. Podbereski, Leibu M 50y M Russia, Hebrew Wisniewe
Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg May 30, 1914
Podbenski, Jankel M 35y M Russia, Hebrew Wishnowa, Russia
Manifest for Oldenburg
Sailing from Bremen
November 22, 1907
. Podbelowicz, Cawe F 22y M Russia, Hebrew Wonsowa, Russia
0002. Podbelowicz, Riezi F 8y S Russia, Hebrew Wonsowa, Russia
0003. Podbelowicz, Ujittel F 6y S Russia, Hebrew Wonsowa

CLICK FOR THE ORIGINAL MANIFEST
USA -

Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp March 05, 1903 .
Kotler, Gunesche F 46y M Russian/Trale
Kotler, Zelde F 7y Russian Trabe
Kotler, Blome F 5y Russian Trabe

husband Lezer Kotler 237 Monroe Street. New York
Gelmann, Lipe F 27y M Russian Wisnowo going to husband Biliami Glman Forsyth Street, New York
Gelmann, Blume F 5y Russian Wisnowo
http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DK%3A%5C%5CT715%2D0327%5C%5CT715%2D03270577%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=102615070039&name=Cluene%26nbsp%3BGelmann&doa=March+++++05%2C+1903&port=Antwerp&line=0009
click here for the original manifest
USA -

Manifest for Kaiserin Augusta Victoria
Sailing from Hamburg. March 15, 1913
Bloch, Josef M 19y S Russia - Polish Wischnero, Russia . going to sister Yenina Bloch in Wilmmington, Del.
.
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Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp July 10, 1906
Kramnik, Feige F 17y S Russian, Hebrew Schilibe, Rus.
0017. Kramnik, Moische M 20Y S Russian, Hebrew Schilibe, Rus.
. Melnik, Berl M 22Y S Russian, Hebrew Willka, Rus . Klein, Sosche F 31y M Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0022. Klein, Feiwel M 9Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0023. Klein, Riwke M 7y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0024. Klein, Chaske F 5Y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus.
0025. Goldschmid, Ischa F 26y S Russian, Hebrew Wisznewe, Rus

.
USA -

Joanna Bloch Wischnewo, Russia 1911 19
1212. Joche Bloch Wolosin, Wilna 1908 11
Manifest for Lapland
Sailing from Antwerp May 15, 1911
0002. Bloch, Joanna FEMALE 19 YEARS OLD, SINGLE Russia, Polish FROM Wischnewo, Russia GOING TO UNCLE; MORRIS LE.? BLOCK http://www.ellisisland.org/EIFile/popup_weif_5a.asp?src=%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Ftif2gif%2Eexe%3FT%3DH%3A%5C%5CT715%2D1678%5C%5CT715%2D16780551%2ETIF%26S%3D%2E5&pID=101127070242&name=Joanna%26nbsp%3BBloch&doa=May+++++++15%2C+1911&port=Antwerp&line=0002
CLICK HERE FOR THE ORIGINAL MANIFEST
USA -

Manifest for Pennsylvania
Sailing from Hamburg June 30, 1907
D'awidson, Mordche M 22y S Russia/Hebrew Wisenewo 5' 6"going to brother Boruch Dawidson, 54 Rutger Street New York
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp February 12, 1913
. Dawidson, Nochem M 22y S Russia Hebrew Wisnowe going to sister ? Dawidson in new York.
Manifest for Neckar
Sailing from Bremen August 26, 1912
Dawidson, Motki M 21y S Russia, Hebrew Toloczin, Russia going to brother Berko Dawidson 28 W. 116 Street New York.
0008. Kraft, Scheine F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Liskowa, Russia

.
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Manifest for Statendam
Sailing from Rotterdam April 14, 1903
Dawidson, Samuel M 19y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowir to brother A. Dawidson 537- 539 W. Broadway New York
Manifest for Potsdam
Sailing from Rotterdam August 12, 1913
. Dawidson, Scheine F 19y S Russian Hebrew Trab, Russia
0030. Lewin, Mariasche F 25y S Russian Hebrew Trab, Russia
. Harwitz, Isze M 10y S Russian Hebrew Wisniwe, Russia to uncle M. Deravitzki? Hartford Conn.
Manifest for Kroonland
Sailing from Antwerp July 09, 1907.
Katz, Chaje F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia going to husband Hirchel Katz
0026. Katz, Scheine F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0027. Katz, Hinde F 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0028. Becher, Ite F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia going to brother Baruch Be cher on Clay Ave
0029. Schapira, Muschke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Walona, Russia
0030. Dawidson, Sore F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia going to brother in New York ? Dawidson
. Kuperstok, Ch... F 16y S Russia, Hebrew Radosakowitz, Russia
.
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Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp June 25, 1922;
0010. Dawidson, Etel F 44Y M RUSSIAN, HEBREW Wisniewo, Russia
0011. Dawidson, Szepszel M 14y S RUSSIAN, HEBREW Wisniewo, Russia
0012. Dawidson, Chaim M 12Y S RUSSIAN, HEBREW Wisniewo, Russia
0013. Dawidson, Ronia F 16y S RUSSIAN, HEBREW Wisniewo, Russia
0014. Dawidson, Baszewa F 18y S RUSSIAN, HEBREW Wisniewo, Russia
all going to husband and father Ellie Dawidson 155 S. 2nd Street Brooklyn
Manifest for Mauretania
Sailing from Southampton July 06, 1923
. Dawidson, Chana F 62y W Poland Hebrew Wolozyn, , Poland going to son; . Salem Dawis, 582 Hackensack Plank Rd. Union Hill, New York
0024. Dawidson, Rysia F 21y S Poland Hebrew Wolozyn
going to brother; Salem Dawis, 582 Hackensack Plank Rd. Union Hill, New York
. Linga, Maciej M 39y M Polish Kurance, , Poland
0011. Kotlar, Judel Chaim M 18y S Russia Wolozin, , Poland going to father; William Kotlar 89 Howard Street New York. 5'5" fair dark eyes and hair.
Manifest for Zeeland
Sailing from Antwerp August 01, 1921
. Dawidson, Feiga F 23y S Polish, Hebrew Wiszniavo going to brother; Isidor Dawidson 38 Bolivar Street Brooklyn
1. Aron Dawidson Hastan, Roumania 1913 16
2. Awrum Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 12
3. Basse Dawidson Mitau, Russia 1909 27
4. Baszewa Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 18
5. Benegon Dawidson 1922
6. Benjamin Dawidson Tucknin, Russia 1913 18
7. Chaim Dawidson Kowna 1893 0
8. Chaim Dawidson Chernigow 1907 18
9. Chaim Dawidson Odessa, Russia 1913 19
10. Chaim Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 12
11. Chana Dawidson Wolozyn, , Poland 1923 62
12. Chane Dawidson 1893 17
13. Chatzkel Dawidson Suwalki 1905 16
14. Cipre Dawidson Hastan, Roumania 1913 11
15. Dawid Dawidson Riga, Russia 1907 32
16. Dawid Dawidson Ermnek Rumenia 1909 23
17. Dawid Dawidson Meszbisz, Russia 1914 20
18. Dina Dawidson Nowogrod, Russia 1921 60
19. Dwosche Dawidson Kanatogs 1906 21
20. Ejdzie Dawidson 1922
21. Elias Dawidson Mohilno 1904 35
22. Elisabeth Dawidson 1912 55
23. Etel Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 44
24. Feiga Dawidson Wiszniado, Poland 1921 23
25. Feige R. Dawidson Schonberg 1905 25
26. Hermann Dawidson Dorohoi, Romania 1907 30
27. Isreal Dawidson Manchester, England 1920 41
28. Itzig Dawidson Harloin, Romania 1912 48
29. Itzik Dawidson Hastan, Roumania 1913 55
30. Jankel Dawidson Kanatogs 1906 19
31. Jankel Dawidson Szypolytko, Russia 1907 30
32. Jankel Dawidson Pawlograd, Russia 1923 19
33. John Dawidson 1893 42
34. John Dawidson Beloe Cerkow, Russia 1907 20
35. John Dawidson 1914 38
36. Kasimir Dawidson Artemowicz, Russia 1911 26
37. Klara Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 9
38. Leib Dawidson Paris, France 1909 21
39. Leon Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 38
40. Lucius Dawidson Lemburg, Poland 1921 29
41. Mendel Dawidson Nowogrod, Russia 1921 15
42. Mina Dawidson Fasniki, Witebsk 1908 24
43. Moise Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 9
44. Mojsche Dawidson Nowogrod, Russia 1913 26
45. Mojsze Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 9
46. Mordche D'awidson Wisenewo 1907 22
47. Motki Dawidson Toloczin, Russia 1912 21
48. Nechama Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 36
49. Nochem Dawidson Wisnowe, Russia 1913 22
50. Perla Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 38
51. Ronia Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 16
52. Rysia Dawidson Wolozyn, , Poland 1923 21
53. Samuel Dawidson Wisnowir 1903 19
54. Scheine Dawidson Trab, Russia 1913 19
55. Schmelek Dawidson Robly, Russia 1912 35
56. Sore Dawidson Wisnowe, Russia 1907 20
57. Sura Dawidson Warsaw, Poland 1921 21
58. Szepszel Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 14
59. Taube Dawidson Kawno 1893 26
60. Tcze Dawidson Osnirany, Russia 1906 18
61. William Dawidson Tauraggen 1905 30



.
-

. Katz, Chaje F 27y M Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0026. Katz, Scheine F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0027. Katz, Hinde F 2y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0028. Becher, Ite F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia
0029. Schapira, Muschke F 17y S Russia, Hebrew Walona, Russia
0030. Dawidson, Sore F 20y S Russia, Hebrew Wisnowe, Russia


.
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une 18, 1913 Manifest for Finland
Sailing from Antwerp
. Wilewski or Wilewska, Stefan M 19y S Russia, Polish from Vishnevo


George Willowsky 1917 30 97%
2. Adam Wilowski Jou...y 1907 36 97%
3. Antoni Wilowski Suprinkowitz, Russia 1913 27 97%
4. Aren Icek Wilowski Antwerp, Belgium 1924 34 97%
5. Charm Wilowski Russia 1911 43 97%
6. Francisfek Wilowski Swirbodfin , , 1906 16 97%
7. Golde Wilowski Gorodez Grodno, Russia 1913 50 97%
8. Jeromin Wilowski Rasye, Russia 1907 24 97%
9. Jos. Wilowski 1901 22 97%
10. Julian Wilowski Konski 1899 27 97%
11. Stanislaw Wilowski Krakaw 1907 17 97%
12. Welwel Wilowski Brest Lit. 1905 19 97%
. Petronela Wilawski Budzanow, Austria 1909 22
2. Piotr Wilawski Budzanow, Austria 1909 24
1. Joseph ...ilawski Gary, Indiana 1924 63 97%
2. Anto... W...ilewski Selapgiere 1901 25 97%
3. Anton Wilewski 1896 42 97%
4. Antoni Wilewski Scaralka, Russia 1913 27 97%
5. David Wilewski Zdrieciot, Pinsk, Poland 1923 52 97%
6. Eisik Wilewski Jitmur 1903 22 97%
7. Iwan Wilewski Wilna, Russia 1907 40 97%
8. Jan Wilewski Zayorow, Russia 1906 23 97%
9. Josef Wilewski Marianspol, Russia 1907 33 97%
10. Karol Wilewski Kostopol 1906 34 97%
11. Paul Wilewski ... 1904 40 97%
12. Scheine Wilewski Grodno, 1904 30 97%
13. Sore Wilewski 1893 21 97%
14. Stefan Wilewski or Wilewska Wisniewka, Russia 1913 19 97%
15. Victor Wilewski 1918 19 97%
16. Viktor Wilewski Grodno, Russia 1909 37 97%
17. Warceli Wilewski Chabzino 1909 28 97%
18. Woicech Wilewski ... 1906 21 97%
4. Constontin Wilewsky Wosmany 1901 22 97%
5. Jan Wilewsky Rudomy 1906 18 97%
6. Sarah Wilewsky Winczum, Russia 1910 18 97%
7. Srul Wilewsky Winezum, Russia 1910 22 97%
1. Alex. ...elowski 1896 27 97%
2. Anton ...elowski 1896 35 97%
3. Abram Walowski ... 1903 22 97%
4. Adam Walowski Nysokie, Russia 1906 24 97%
5. Anna Walowski Dak...cy 1903 4 97%
6. Chain Leib Walowski Weise... 1903 16 97%
7. Dominick Walowski 1892 21 97%
8. Ian Walowski Plock 1899 22 97%
9. Israel Walowski Minck, Russia 1912 17 97%
10. Jan Walowski Barzl, Kalis, Russia 1913 34 97%
11. Jan Walowski Dak...cy 1903 33 97%
12. Josef Walowski Orzecharoc 1907 23 97%
13. Katarryna Walowski Dak...cy 1903 0 97%
14. Maryana Walowski Dak...cy 1903 35 97%
15. Mateus Walowski Skodwill, Russia 1910 40 97%
16. Pawel Walowski Lysagna, Austria 1904 23 97%
17. Stanislaw Walowski Kikol , , 1906 17 97%
18. Stanislaw Walowski Wysokis, Russia 1907 28 97%
19. Stanislaw Walowski South Bend, Ind. 1920 52 97%
20. Wadysl. Walowski Lagiewinke 1901 29 97%
21. Zofia Walowski Dak...cy 1903 2 97%
22. ... Walowski Orzecharoc 1907 24 97%
. Josef Wolewski Zaryacze, Russia 1912 20
2. Kazena Wolewski 1908
3. Wladyslaw Wolewski Tosrejc, Russia 1913 19
1. ...er... ...olewski 1892 97%
2. John ...olewski 1892 29 97%
3. Marie ...olewski 1892 21 97%
4. Aleksander Wolawski Zawadka 1906 22 97%
5. Franciszek Wolawski Iwanowka, Austria 1912 38 97%
6. Ozcher Wolawski Recize 1906 18 97%
7. Woyceh Wolawski Vonsk 1905 24 97%

1. JOZSEF WILUSKI ZSNKOCZ 1902 33 97%
2. Marcel Wileski Wilmington, Del. 1923 27
1. Adam Widwiski Radziejewo, Russia 1909 23 94%
2. Jochiel Wilwaski 1893 30 94%
3. Jonie Wilwaski 1893 2 94%
4. Moses Wilwaski 1893 0 94%
5. Rebecca Wilwaski 1893 7 94%
6. Vera Wilwaski 1893 27 94%
. Alber Wolowizki Kerdulen 1903 19 93%
. Adam Wolowtzki Litzko, Russia 1910 33





.
-

Subj: Re: [belarus] Re: EIDB manifest - and a Vision
Date: 7/10/01 3:26:51 PM Pacific Daylight Time
From: smrogers@cousinsplus.com (Susan M. Rogers)
To: EilatGordn@aol.com
Hi, Ms. Eliat,
I am a GREAT admirer of the web work you have done and have found several
names that appear in various branches of my family -- but none of my major 4
names personally.

These are
Davidson,
Rogoff
Meltzer

I would LOVE your input. Idea: here are the Volozin names in my family:

12 Volozin Harris Farberman, husband of Ida Uberstine; Etta Meltzer, wife of Harris Uberstine; Moishe Gelman, husband of Udasha Uberstine, and their children: Ike, Lou and Rashka Gelman; Ike's daughter, Ida Mary Gelman;
Shimsel Kirshner, husband of Rashka Gelman, and their children, Esther,Faye, and Al Kirshner; and Nathan Kirshner-Glockner, husband of Cherla Uberstine, and their children, Aleck and Dora Glockner.
13 Zasliai Draishka Brenner, wife of Mayer Uberstine

10 Vilna *Rabbi Jacob David ben Ze'eb Willowski (Ridbaz), elected dayyan [ecclesiastical judge] and maggid [communal preacher], 1881
11 Vishniev Sophie Ruchel Davidson, wife of Ike Gelman

*Paternal uncle of Rose Willowski (wife of Barnet Cohen, the oldest son of
Aaron Kahanovich and Toby Uberstine).


Attached is the whole list as an .rtf you can click.

Best,
Susan


Attached is the entire .rtf of where our people are from.


Who came from where?


1
Brest Litovsk Esther Simon, wife of Morris Rubenstein
---------------
Ekatarinoslav Harry Varonok, husband of Ethel Rubenstein ----------------
3 Grodno Aaron Kahanovich, husband of Toby Uberstine ------------------
4 Kobrin *Rabbi Jacob David ben Ze'eb Willowski ('Ridbaz')------------
5 Krasnoye Carl Karbenovich, husband of Dora Rubenstein --------------
6 Ostroshitskiy Gorodok Usher Uberstine; Ethel, Louis,
--------------------
Hirschel, Hyman, and Israel Rubenstein; Morris, Esther Minnie, Henry, Jack, and Dora Rubenstein; and Shirley and Artie Karben. Lazar Uberstine; Udasha, Toby, Cherla, Ida, Harris, Mayer and Israel Uberstine; children of Toby Uberstine and Aaron Kahanovich: Lena, Barnet, Channa, Minnie, Meyer, Mollie and Eli; Rafael Millerkowski, husband of Lena Cohen. (30)
7 Radishkovici Phil Karben
------------------
8 Slutsk *Rabbi Jacob David ben Ze'eb Willowski ('Slutsker
----------
Rav,' 1980)

9 Tarnow Max Sollender, husband of Rose Varonok
-----------
10 Vilna *Rabbi Jacob David ben Ze'eb Willowski (Ridbaz),
----------
elected dayyan [ecclesiastical judge] and maggid [communal preacher], 1881
11 Vishnievo Sophie Ruchel Davidson, wife of Ike Gelman
--------------
12 Volozin Harris Farberman, husband of Ida Uberstine; Etta Meltzer, wife of Harris Uberstine; Moishe Gelman, husband of Udasha Uberstine, and their children: Ike, Lou and Rashka Gelman; Ike’s daughter, Ida Mary Gelman; Shimsel Kirshner, husband of Rashka Gelman, and their children, Esther, Faye, and Al Kirshner; and Nathan Kirshner-Glockner, husband of Cherla Uberstine, and their children, Aleck and Dora Glockner.
13 Zasliai Draishka Brenner, wife of Mayer Uberstine

*Paternal uncle of Rose Willowski (wife of Barnet Cohen, the oldest son of
Aaron Kahanovich and Toby Uberstine).


.
-

Most Jewish families had relatives in near by shtetls- I am posting here a list of names of names of people who are donors for a shtetl project near Vishnevo
Here is an updated list of donors for the Cemetery Project in Dolhinov(Most are natives of Dolhinov). For address of the people on the list email:
rubinlj@netvision.net.il (RUBIN LEON)


1. Alperovich Tova Ramat Gan, Israel $250
2. Blum Bushke Givataim, Israel $250
3. Berzam Chaya Ramat Gan, Israel $250
4. Baranovski Chava Ramat Gan, Israel $250
5. Gitlitz Yecheskel Tel Aviv, Israel $250
6. Gitlin Avi Ramat Hasharon , Israel $375
7. Grosbien Chaim Petach Tikva, Israel $250
8. Golan (Goltz) Yechezkel Rehovot, Israel $185
9. Dr. Goltz- Doytch Miryam Haifa Israel $250

10.Chafetz Asya Tel Aviv, Israel $250
11.Chafetz Gutman Tel Aviv, Israel $250
12.Cheres Yehuda Herzelia, Israel $500
13.Finesilber Beny Haifa, Israel $250
14. Lenkin Nachum Holon, Israel $250
15. Norman Shimon Petach Tiqva, Israel $250
16. Norman Yitzhak Givataim, Israel $250
17. Fridman Moshe Kfar Saba, Israel $250
18. Koton Levi Ytzhak Holon, Israel $250
19.Kravchinski Rachel Petach Tiqva, Israel $250
20. Kremer-Sosenski Batya Ashdod, Israel $250
21.Dimshtein Lev Alfey Menashe, Israel $250
22.Perevoskin Aharon Ganey Yochanan, Israel $250
23.Shlechtman (Sosensky) Sima Ashdod, Israel $250
24.Shinuk David Rishon Lezion, Israel $250
25.Shulman Hinda Ramat Gan, Israel $250
26.Shamgar (Smorgonski) Shlomo, Givataim, Israel $250
27.Sosensky Yehuda Ganey Yochanan, Israel $250
28.Rubin Leon Ramat Efal, Israel $250
29.Rubin Arye Givataim, Israel $250
30.Rubin Victor Chedera, Israel $250
31.Rubin Israel Neveh Mivtach, Israel $250
32.Rapson/ Ekman Michael Avichail, Israel $250
33.Radashkovich Gideon Givataim, Israel $250
34.Radashkovich Mordechay Givataim, Israel $250
35.Radashkovich Roni Givataim, Israel $200
36.Podshivalov (Shpreregen) Fanya Nesher; Israel $ 200
37.Fridman Eli Argentina $250.
38.Griner Chasya Brazil $375
39.Drewiacki Max Berlin, Germany $375
40.Mr. & Mrs. Jack Diamond Omaha, U.S.A $250
41.Eilat Gordin Levitan, Studio City, Ca U.S.A $250
42.Shmilovich Avraham Kvar Saba Israel $125
43.Tych Raja (nee Bronshtein) Ramat Gan Israel $275
44.Zolotov Zipora Lahavim Israel $250
45.Markman Sonya New Haven U.S.A. $100
46.Yofe Sima Ramat Gan Israel $125
47.Labunski Fanny(nee Ruderman) Haifa Israel $125
48. Radashkovich Eliyahu Ramat Gan Israel $100
49. Radashkovich Arie Tel Aviv Israel $125
50. Gayer Rita Petach Tiqva Israel $250
51. Rapson Dov (Melamed) Avichail Israel $250
52. Rapson Avigdor (Ekman) Herzelia Israel $250
53. Paz Yosef & Dvora Haifa Israel $250
54. Sosenski Yaakov Ashdod Israel $125
55. Sosenski Sima Ganey yochanan Israel $125
56. Ben Barak Gallia Rechovot Israel $125
57. Shor Maya (nee Sosensky) Bizaron Israel $125
58. Sosenski Eli Ashdod Israel $125
59. Kaplan Klila Tel Aviv Israel $125
60. Kanter Laura (nee Libe Rubin)Boca Raton Fl. U.S.A $500
61. Schuster Riva Kvar Saba Israel $125
62. Brant Sara Navei Mivtach Israel $100
63. Aminetsach Yehuda Herzelia Israel $125
64. Aminetsach Avraham Jerusalem Israel $125
65. Shmilovich Zelig Omer Israel $125
66. Ruderman Florence New York U.S.A. $150
67. Chalifa Raja(nee Rubin)Navei Mivtach Israel $125
68. Shap Gerald & family (Grosbein)Cape-Town,South Africa $650
69. Harcavi (Furman) Meier Ramat Hasharon Israel $250
70. Harcavi Chanan Ramat Efal Israel $250
71. Rosen Lester & Debby Glencoe , Chicago U.S.A. $250
72. Susan M. Goldsmith of Piedmont, CA ,U.S.A. $500
73. Jacob Chevlin, Florida, U.S.A $250
74. Simon Chevlin, New Haven, U.S.A $250
75. Shifra( nee Chevlin) Zamkov, New Haven, U.S.A. $500
76. Ester Telis (Dockshitzki) Cheshire, Con. U.S.A. $500
77. Prof. M. Shapiro Hod Hashron, Israel $100
78. Zipi Asafi (Grosbien) Kfar Saba, Israel $125

79. Dr. Orania Yanay Tel Aviv, Israel $250

80. Dr. Dimenshtein Victor Tel Aviv, Israel $250

81. Liberman Batya & Esar Fridman Kvar Saba, Israel $125

82. Rabani Ziva Jerusalem, Israel $125

83. Evalyn Krown New York,U.S.A.$100

84. Shamgar Giora ,Ramat Gan,Israel $125

85. Lechterman Chaim Tzahala,Israel $125

86. Malerevitch Batya (nee Lechterman) Tel Aviv,Israel $125

87. Gitlitz Orah & Tzipi, Givataim, Israel $125

88. Bronshtein Chana Ramat Gan , Israel $250

89. Doytch Israel, Petach Tiqva, Israel $125

90. Dr. Bronshtein Michael Tel Aviv ,Israel $250

91. Gutman Palant, Moshav Magshimim,Israel $250



This is a list of donors who participated financially so far in the restoration of the Jewish cemetery in Dolhinov. The project is estimated to cost $25,000. About 84% of it was already collected.
For address of the people on the list email:
rubinlj@netvision.net.il (RUBIN LEON)
Leon Rubin ,Tel:o3-6356469,Ramat Efal,Israel





Leon Rubin rubinlj@netvision.net.il
-

Subj: Fw: Brest news/Íàâ_íû ç Á__ñòà (BrestOnline.com)
Date: 6/27/01 9:28:58 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: plastic6@juno.com (charles straczynski)
To: EilatGordn@aol.com

Att: Eilat

Á__ñòOnline.com: Íàâ_íû ç Á__ñòà, Áåëà_óñü
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------
Àòî_àê, 26 ___âåíÿ 2001.: Seminar on Holocaust lessons held in Brest
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------
About 70 history teachers from schools and universities in Belarus,
Russia and Ukraine took part in an international seminar in Brest from
June 21 to 24 dedicated to teaching lessons of Holocaust.
Taking part were World War II veterans, former Brest Ghetto prisoners,
and schoolchildren from the three countries who won competitions for the
best Holocaust study. The seminar has been organized by Yad Vashem, the
Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Foundation, Russia's Holocaust
foundation and the Brest-based Holocaust Education Center. Addressing
the seminar participants, Ety Katzir-Kaslasy, counsellor and consul of
the Israeli embassy in Minsk, said that Brest hosted the seminar because
it fought the first battle against the Nazis when Germany invaded the
Soviet Union 60 years ago.
"Today we face the challenge of teaching the next generation the facts
and the lessons of the Holocaust. We must teach the facts, lest they be
forgotten or worse, distorted by so called 'revisionist historians' who
engage in the most monstrous perversion of their profession," Ms.
Katzir-Kaslasy said. One of the main lessons of the Holocaust is that no
society, no matter how technologically advanced, no matter how cultured,
is immune from degenerating into murderous violence, which is fed by
ethnic hatred, she said.
Ms. Katzir-Kaslasy recalled that on June 11 the memorial dedicated to the
Martyrs of the Ghetto in Brest was shamefully desecrated by swastika and
anti-Semitic slogans. Holocaust seminars will be organized in Belarus on
a regular basis, Svetlana Mashchenko, an employee of the Israeli
embassy's information service, told BelaPAN. She said that a Holocaust
course would soon be included in school curricular in Russia. A similar
course is being prepared in Belarus and the Israeli embassy offers its
assistance to any initiatives in this direction, Ms. Mashchenko said.



.
-

Nathan.Szyszko@dcaa.mil, cousin of Binyomin Shapir Shishko from both Vishnevo and Volozhin asked about pictures of the matzaivos (headstones) from volozhin and Vishnevo. if anyone has pictures please let him know. Thank you
.
-

I am an archivist in Boulder, Colorado, and also a member of the Boulder
Yiddish Vinkl started by Dvorah Halperin Biasca. I don't know much
Yiddish, but would like, eventually, to be able to speak and read Yiddish
literature, most likely through a formal course of study somewhere.

Recently, my uncle told me that his father (actually my great-grandfather
who hailed from Vishnevo, now in Belarus) spent his free time writing
Utopian stories in Yiddish, filling notebook after notebook.
Unfortunately, none of the notebooks seems to be in existence any longer.

For Andrew Cassel, who inquired about the definition of "salte-nosis": my
maternal grandmother (who is still alive at 101) is from Keidan
originally, and she made the "best" saltinosis (according to my mother).
It's a triangular-shaped kreplach filled with cottage cheese and my
grandmother usually floated it (them) in "milk-soup," and added dollops
of sour cream. She was also known to occasionally fill the kreplach with
ground-up meat (not hamburger), fried it and served it on the side with
brisket. My mother has a recipe for it from a Pesach cookbook, believe
it or not, and said she would send it along.

I was pleased to see the discussion about the pronunciation of "bubbi"
and "zeydi" versus "bubba" and "zeyda" because we have an ongoing dispute
in our family about that...no we're not Toronto vs. Montreal, but upstate
New York (Syracuse and Rochester) versus Brooklyn. The upstaters say,
bubbi and zeydi, and the New Yorkers (downstaters) just the opposite.
Lest I perpetuate the war between these two factions, I would just like
to say that some years ago when I said "latkee" and "blintzee" to a
friend who had grown up on the Lower East Side, I was roundly condemned
by her and told that "my" pronunciation was ignorant...

My sister believes this really is an issue of where you grew up in
America (or in Canada) not where your ancestors came from (two
grandparents from Lithuania, one from White Russia, and one from
Hungary--her family spoke German not Yiddish anyway).

Diane Rabson (Dvorah Masha)


.
-

Shalom Eilat,

I asked my mother who are the Podberesky's from Vishneve and she knows about 5 of them (4 are still alive one of them is Shimon Podberesky from Kibutz Eilon):
Podberesky Lipke, lives in Fort Lauderdale FL. Tel. 954-485-5581 (he is almost 90 years old).
Podber Abe, Atlanta GA Tel. 404-874-4255
Podberesky Noah, lives in Baltimore PA. Tel. 410-602-2209
Milikovsky Tzion - Son of Esther Milikovsky (podberesky) San Diego CA. Tel. 858-756-7487 or 858-454-5158.

.
-

Subj: The correct Email.
Date: 6/11/01 1:47:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time
From: ziva_c@hotmail.com (Ziva Chumash)
To: Eilatgordn@aol.com

I made some changes to this email so if you read the other one first this is
the correct version.

Hi Eilat,
Thanks for your efforts. I want to give you some background and maybe it
will help:

The story as my father had heard as a child is, that his mother Zelda
Pearlman left Vishneve with her parents and her brothers and sisters (there
were 6 children including Zelda) to the States sometimes in the beginning of
the 20th century.

Zelda was the eldest daughter and for some reason she returned to Vishneve
alone,
got married to Leib Bunimowitz and as we know all of her family (in
Vishneve) except for my father was killed by the Nazis.

Nobody knows how old she was when she came to the states, the Year of
arrival to the states and when she left back to Vishneve.

My father's original name was Eliakim Bunimowitz (Today his name is Natan
Drori).
He served in the Polish army when World war II began, he fought against the
germens in
a cavalry unit, all of the unit was shot dead in battle except for him and
another person who tried to get to Vishneve by train (my father was injured)
but they were caught by Russian troops who considered them as spies and they
were taken to Siberia.
They remained there for a period of 3 years in hard labor until General
Andres gathered all of the polish prisoners in order to take them to the
front in North Africa.
In 1943 while passing through Israel (Palestine then) all the Jewish
soldiers defected,
and were hided in the Jewish settlements and their names were changed to
"Israeli like" names.

My father was brought to Kibbutz Eilon, where he found Shimon Podberesky
from Vishneve and through him the rest of the people who came from Vishneve
to Israel.
That is how he met my mother, Galia Abramson, the daughter of Chanoch -
Chaim Abramson's brother (Chaim was the editor of the Vishneve book).

In the 40's he looked for his family in the States and he found his
grandfather (Abraham) who remarried after his first wife, lena, died.
He found that he had 8 aunts and uncles in the States (Sisters and brothers
of his mother Zelda).
His grandfather died, as we know, in February 8th 1951, and he is buried in
Mt. Hebron in Queens N.Y. .
Along the years we corresponded with a part of the family and some of them
even visited us in Israel.

Today one aunt is still alive (she is 94 years old - she was the first one
to be born in the States) and there are 19 cousins of my father - We know
where most of them live, with some of them we are still in touch.

No one can give us the information we are looking for and unfortunatly they
aren't as eager as I to find our family roots.

Before we turned to you we tried every possible place on the Internet to
find out information about our family roots, without any success.
It is very amazing that in the Ellis Island site there is no clue what so
ever about any of my father's grandparents and their family.

In addition to the information i already gave you I want to add that I have
an official paper from 1966 (Bureau of the Census - Washington D.C.) that
was given to Benjamin Pearlman before he flew to Israel (for his Visa).
In this paper there is information from the Census of 1920 and it is written
there that Abraham Pearlman immigrated in 1903 and Benjamin Pearlman in
1906.
We know that Benjamin Pearlman was born April 11th 1902 and their address at
that time was: 1726 Victor, Bronx N.Y. .
Hope you can help me to find more information.
Thanks in Advance,
Ziva Chumash.



.
-

Shalom,

Thank you for your prompt reply.
I have the Vishneve book of memories so I am familiar with all the information in it. Unfortunately, there is quite a few information's about my family - if any, and even the names of members of the family that perished are deficient. The picture of Zelda and her two sons was given by my parents - this is the only picture they have and my father is eager to find more pictures of his family especially of his father. by the way, my parents are Drori Nathan & Galia from Tzur-Igal. My father original name was Elyakim Bunimovitch -got his new name on his arrival to Palestine with Anders Army - 1943. My father doesn't know the names of his grand-grandparents. He only remembers the names of his grandparents - from his father's side: Perla & Moishe Bunimovitch and from his mother's side: Lea & Avram Shmuel Pearlman, so we don't know who is Haya Gitl who's tombstone picture was sent to me by you. I can't read the year of her death. It might be that she belonged to a generation before my grand-grandfather.

What I really want to know is how to find information about the pearlman family that arrived to the States probably between 1903 - 1906. their names as far as I know are: Avram Shmuel Pearlman, his wife Lea (or Lena) and their children: Zelde, Yacov (jack), Sadie, Bob, Benjamin & Alice - some of the names are American names and they might have had originally other names.

Any help will be most appreciated.

Thanks a lot,

Ziva Chumash
.
-

Shalom,

Thank you for your prompt reply.
I have the Vishneve book of memories so I am familiar with all the information in it. Unfortunately, there is quite a few information's about my family - if any, and even the names of members of the family that perished are deficient. The picture of Zelda and her two sons was given by my parents - this is the only picture they have and my father is eager to find more pictures of his family especially of his father. by the way, my parents are Drori Nathan & Galia from Tzur-Igal. My father original name was Elyakim Bunimovitch -got his new name on his arrival to Palestine with Anders Army - 1943. My father doesn't know the names of his great-grandparents. He only remembers the names of his grandparents - from his father's side: Perla & Moishe Bunimovitch and from his mother's side: Lea & Avram Shmuel Pearlman, so we don't know who is Haya Gitl who's tombstone picture was sent to me by you. I can't read the year of her death. It might be that she belonged to a generation before my great-grandfather.

What I really want to know is how to find information about the pearlman family that arrived to the States probably between 1903 - 1906. their names as far as I know are: Avram Shmuel Pearlman, his wife Lea (or Lena) and their children: Zelde, Yacov (jack), Sadie, Bob, Benjamin & Alice - some of the names are American names and they might have had originally other names.

Any help will be most appreciated.

Thanks a lot,

Ziva Chumash
.
-

I found in The JewishGen Family Finder a note that someone is looking for Bunimovitz from Vishnevo:
From : eilat gordin levitan eilatgordin@aol.com
Address :
Phone : 818 506 4136
Remote Computer : 64.165.229.70
To : Ziva Chumash, ziva_c@hotmail.com (researcher code 58737)
Subject : The JewishGen Family Finder:
=======================================================
I created pages for vishnevo, Volozhin and krivichi - all have Bunimovbitz
family members pictures and information. you could find them at
www.eilatgordinlevitan.com. please sign one of the guest books on the sites
with your information. and read other Bunimovitz emails on the Volozhin
guest book. (right next to Vishnevo many of the same families lived in both places )
thank you. eilat
Subj: Re: The JewishGen Family Finder:
Date: 6/9/01 10:12:50 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: ziva_c@hotmail.com (Ziva Chumash)
To: Eilatgordn@aol.com

Dear Eilat Gordin Levitan,

Thank you so much for the information you have pointed out to me about my
ancestors. I am looking for information about my great grandfather & his
daughter my grandmother, who immigrated from Vishnevo to the USA around
1903. their names were Abraham Pearlman and Zelde (or Zelda or Selde or
Selda) Pearlman. my grandmother returned to vishnevo several years later,
married Leib (Arie) Bunimovitz, both were killed by the Nazis in
vishnevo. I know that my great grandfather lived in Bronx and died at the
beginning of 1951. the only thing that I know is that he wasn buried in
Mt. Hebron cemetery.
I am looking for more information about my ancestors. Can you please direct
me were I can search for accurate information about my family?
thank you for your help.
Ziva Chumash
Subj: Re: The JewishGen Family Finder:
Date: 6/9/01 11:16:41 PM Pacific Daylight Time
From: EilatGordn
To: ziva_c@hotmail.com
CC: poratm@netvision.net.il

In a message dated 6/9/01 10:12:50 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ziva_c@hotmail.com writes:
I am looking for information....
A picture of Zelda Bunimovitz and two sons click here; http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_images/12_6_2vish_b.gif
Perished in Vishnevo; Bunimovitz Leyb, Zelda, his wife, Hertzl, their son



Bunimovitz Akiva

5.Bunimovitz Reyzl , Reyzl's son
Moshe Porat Perlman poratm@netvision.net.il wrote;
The PERELMAN- ITSHAYKIN: my father’s parents.

My great-grandfather Yehoshua Anshel PERELMAN was the Vishnevo (a small village near Volozhyn) Rabbi. Before World War One he immigrated to Eretz Israel, where he changed his last name to "MARGOLIS" (Hebrew for "PEARL") and served as the town of Rehovot Rabbi. I am not sure why he left his children behind in Vishnevo. His son, who was my grandfather, was named MOYSHE PERELMAN (I bear his name). He married who was to be my grandmother, MALKA ITZHAYKIN, Rabbi Hayim Volozhyner’s Great-great-Granddaughter. Moyshe Perelman owned a vine shop and an insurance agency. They lived in the famous Volozhyn Rabbi’s house that was Grandmother Malka inheritance.
Subj: 52401_1_b.gif
Date: 6/10/01 4:19:23 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: poratm@netvision.net.il (Porat Moshe)
To: ziva_c@hotmail.com
CC: EilatGordn@aol.com (Eilat Gordon)

File: 52401_1_b.gif.url (212 bytes)
DL Time (44000 bps): 1 minute

Ziva Shalom

We had in Volozhyn (near Vishnevo) many many Bunimovitsh (read A bundle of memories about the Bunimovich brothers) Volozhin - http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/volozhin.html Volozhin Stories http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_pages/volstoriesmenu.html
A Bundle of Memories http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_pages/vol_stories1.html


The Bunimovich-Perelman tombstone we found in Volozhin graveyard in 1998, we took a photo below you find the address;

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/52401_1_b.gif

It is very old and almost destroyed and very difficult to read. It seems to be the tombstone of Haya Gitl daughter of Rafael Bunimovitsh married to Aron Yakov Perlman.

What I also know is that now there is a Bunimovitsh from Vishnievo. He lives in Israel in a hamlet called Tsur Igal.

Good luck

Moshe Porat - Perlman




click for a picture of Ziuva's grandmother;
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Memories From Vishnievo Ghetto:
By Ema Mikhaylovna Murtshanka - Voroniezh (Russia)
Volozhin "Pamiat’" book, (page 166).
Translated from Russian by M. Porat.
"I expirienced and witnessed with my own eyes the bestial deeds of the Fascists murderers and their local cooperators in the Vishnievo Ghetto. Yes, so it was: Together with my family, childhood friends and relatives, also with the rest of the dejected Jewish residents of Vishnevo, at the age of seventeen I was physically thrown (by the hands of the fascists and their local collaborators- the traitors) into the Vishnievo detention Ghetto-camp. Here I experienced during the years of 1941-42 every method of abuse and the most horrific and tormenting treatment by the hands of the fascists and their murderous local helpers.
One day they enclosed the entire Vishnievo-Jewish population into the Tserkov (Russian church). All of them were ordered to lie on the floor and had been left in this position for the entire day without any water or food. At evening time, they were dispensed with armed guards, each one to his home to pick up the most needed things. Immediately afterwards the Jews were ordered to reassemble on Krevo Street. When we arrived, we found that a high fence with barbed wire encircled Krevo Street.
So that is how the Vishnievo Concentration Ghetto Camp was created. Here were detained the entire 1600 Vishnievo Jews. From this day on began our painful life inside the fascists’ inhuman detention camp. One Thousand six hundred people had to live on one tiny street. In each tiny room three to four families were crowded including men, women, elderly, sick people and children.
During the summer warm days the Ghetto dwellers would somehow manage to survive, they were exchanging the objects they quickly succeeded to take into the ghetto for food.
But when the cold arrived, the miserable inhabitants lacked food and firewood. The sole salvation was in the daily hunt for jobs by the ghetto youngsters. They would work for the Germans who in exchange gave them a small amount of food. They would be taken into the forest to prepare firewood, or to the Bogdanovo rail station. On the way they would exchange some objects, which we still succeeded to guard by some miracle. The Politsays robbed the most valuable objects.
The returning workers succeeded to bring a bundle of twigs, a bottle of milk or few potatoes. But all these goods had to be hidden in the most sophisticated ways. The most pleasurable event for the Ghetto guards used to be to deprive the "food smuggler" of their sprinkle of twigs at the camp gates. And when the poor, tired and terrified Ghetto workers would be able to breath with relief hopping to bring a bit of food to their little sisters or to supply some heating for their old and sick grand parents, suddenly they appeared, the Politsays and maliciously conducted an precise search. When the prohibited matter would be found they would take it away, beat bestially its possessor and let him go home bleeding and lacerated with an empty bundle to unite empty handed with his impatiently waiting, cold and hungry relatives.
And even more frustrating was to see our previous colleagues and schoolmates among the cruel inhuman beasts, the local Politsays.
On our way to work we were permitted to go upon the road only not on the sidewalk. We were obliged to wear on the chest the yellow-blue David star patch. But more than cold and hunger we feared the abuse and maltreatment of the Germans and their assistants. In particular feared it the children and youngsters.
We were very afraid of the Policeman Yourovitsh and the commander Pashkovski. I will never forget their evil faces and their cruel tortures. Until now I see in my nightmares their bestial faces.
They had a dreadful hobby. Horse riding they used to break into the ghetto and to chase all the inhabitants on the street, all of them, men, women, old, young, children and babies. They used to beat the chased Jews with horsewhips until unconsciousness. When satisfied, they would find a baby in his mothers’ arms and would pierce the child with a rifle mounted bayonet, to stick it in his body, to lift the pierced child and to fling him with his head down, on the stones. When the mother went crazy, they cold blooded shot her. The local murderers witnessed all that. They laughed joyfully. The bandits used to take photos of the horrible scenes.
Every day the camp awaited its impending liquidation. The Germans did not conceal it. The imprisoned could not sleep. Anticipating the worse, they listened to each rustle and to the wild songs and vociferations of the oppressors. Once when we were at work in Bogdanovo, Yelena Gurevitsh my friend and I, we chose the first opportune moment, we run into the forest and finally joined the Tshapayev Partisan unit.
The Vishnievo ghetto concentration camp was liquidated on August 1942. The murderers encircled the Ghetto and chased all the Jews into an empty barn at the end of Krevo Street. Soon they began the shooting. Gasoline was spilled over the barn and the survivors with the dead were burnt together.
At my return to Vishnievo after the victory I found on the barn’s place a tall hill. All of it was filled with black burnt human bones. Above the hill a horrible smell of ashes spread. And that was all that remained from my family, my close friends and all the Vishnievo Jews. After the war from the entire Vishnievo Jewish population survived only 10 to 15 persons. And now we are only two: Gurevitsh Yelena Israilovna who lives in Perm and I. " ( there are a few others alive in the U.S and Israel)





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PAMIAT' - MEMORY to the Volozhyn Region
In 1996 the authorities of the Volozhin region published a book, written in the local Byelorussian language.
The book contains 450 pages. It describes the region's history and geography. The Volozhin region (poviat) expands some sixty Km. from Bogdanovo eastward through Vishnievo & Volozhin to Rakov, and forty Km. from Losk southward through Volozhin & Piershay to Ivianietz .
In the region's southern part between Volozhin and Ivianiets, alongside the Islotsh river expands the big Volozhin and Nalibok forest ("Pushtsha").
Working diligently with the material( 450 pages) that was written in strange, new literary Byelorussian-language, we identified some material concerning the Jews, who populated this area and formed the majority of the towns inhabitants.
The written material regarding the Jews is scarce and disproportional in its little regard to the most horrendous mass murders that had been committed in the Volozhin region by the bestial invaders and by their ardent local supporters
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New order in Vishnevo
By K. Pobal
Volozhin "Pamiat’" book, page 164.
Translated from the Belarusian language by M. Porat.

A Red Army convoy approached the outskirts of Vishnievo on June 27th 1941 at an early afternoon hour. German aircraft bombed the convoy. While the bombs devastated the Soviet unit, they also set on fire seven houses on Volozhin Street. The bodies of the Red Army soldiers were promptly buried in the Old Graves. The Germans had occupied the town on the same day. They immediately established a Police center. Local people were appointed as policemen and commanders. The policemen killed a group of Vishnievo residents on the first day of their appointment.
Without delay they hang signs around the town with written orders: "Each Jew should put a yellow patch formed as a six pointed star (David’s Star) on the breast and on the spine". "Who’s sheltering a Jew would be shot". "Who’s giving bread to a Jew would be shot". "Who’s sheltering a Communist or a Soviet soldier would be shot". The old (Polish) administrative partition was renewed. Vishnievo became a Gmina (Village authority) in the Volozhin Poviat (region), Vilna Oblast’ (District). All inhabitants of the Gmina area had been obliged to behave according to the local authorities orders. The police imprisoned each one who did not seem be loyal to the German regime. An inhabitant of Polish or Belaruss nationality only could receive an "Ausswais" some identity card. Jews and other people had no right to carry it. Those whom they did catch without "Auswais" were shot or sent to forced labor in Germany.
In the first days of occupation the Germans ad the "Politsays" established the Jewish Ghetto on the Krevo Street.
In M. Mikhaylashov’s book " The Anger Storm", published in Minsk (1971), chapter "The Court Trial" page 207 we read: "In mid July 1942 we came to the town Volozhin , where we shot some two thousand Jews — men, women and children. Grabe was the execution commander. In Volozhin I personally shot hundred and twenty Jews. Later I arrived in the Vishnievo hamlet with our sondercommando unit. Here we executed one thousand five hundred Jews. The action commander was Grabe"
Today in place of the execution stands a memorial. In big letters it asserts: "In 1942 t 2066 Soviet citizens were shot here".
In the summer 1992 Mr. Shimon Peres the Israel foreign minister visited Vishnevo. He looked for the tombs of his ancestors and also visited the big slaughter place of his relatives and childhood friends who were so bestially annihilated in 1942. Peres was born in Vishnievo. He has gone to Israel before the war.

Moshe Porat Perlman poratm@netvision.net.il
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The Milikowsky family of Vishnevo was a well to do family.
here are to family members who I found on the Ellis Island site.

Milikowsky, Riwke

Russia, Hebrew

Wiszniewo

12 Mar 1907

26y

F

M

Pretoria Manifest for Pretoria
Sailing from Hamburg March 12, 1907
0007. Milikowsky, Riwke F 26years old Married, Russia, Hebrew from Wiszniewo
0008. Milikowsky, Mere F 3y S Russia, Hebrew Wiszniewo






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Riwke Milikowsky Wiszniewo 1907 26 97%
25. Mere Milikowsky Wiszniewo 1907 3 97%
18. Jacob Milikowsky Walozyn 1905 17 97%
1. ...ilis Milikowski Russia 1910 4
2. Chain Milikowski Wilna, Russia 1911 32
3. Chain Milikowski Oszwany, Russia 1911 32
4. Cipe Milikowski Wilna 1904 18
5. Efroim Milikowski Smargon 1905 32
6. Ester Milikowski Slonim, Russia 1909 15
7. Feige Milikowski Slonim, Russia 1909 35
8. Jankal Milikowski Slonim, Russia 1909 6
9. Judel Milikowski Grajew, Russia 1908 28
10. L... Milikowski Russia 1910 36
11. Leib Milikowski Minsk, Russia 1914 26
12. Leibe Milikowski Slonim, Russia 1909 6
13. Mandel Milikowski Krewr 1905 20
14. Moische Milikowski Smargon 1906 20
15. Moische Milikowski Stutzin, Russia 1912 15
16. Mojsche Milikowski Wilno 1903 31
17. Nathan Milikowski Monuwil 1907 24
18. Schenie Milikowski Bernoui, Russia 1909 19
19. Solomund Milikowski Russia 1910 8
20. M... Milikowski Russia 1910 10
1. Abe Milikowsky Stuzin 1906 14 97%
2. Abram Milikowsky Horodoh 1903 44 97%
3. Alter Milikowsky Russia Minsk 1911 20 97%
4. Chaike Milikowsky Zerforany, Russia 1906 7 97%
5. Chaim Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 6 97%
6. Chaim Milikowsky Krewen 1904 19 97%
7. Chaim Leib Milikowsky Krewer, Russia 1911 18 97%
8. Chaskel Milikowsky Russia, Szmagow 1914 17 97%
9. Chyke Milikowsky Krewen 1904 18 97%
10. David Milikowsky Krewv 1904 19 97%
11. Eide Milikowsky Zerforany, Russia 1906 2 97%
12. Eisig Milikowsky 1913 19 97%
13. Elke Milikowsky Telegan, Russia 1913 17 97%
14. Elke Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 34 97%
15. Ette Milikowsky Zerforany, Russia 1906 4 97%
16. Feige Milikowsky Zerforany, Russia 1906 32 97%
17. Hye Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 10 97%
18. Jacob Milikowsky Walozyn 1905 17 97%
19. Jankel Milikowsky Ozrw...y 1904 20 97%
20. Jaukel Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 8 97%
21. Joniach Milikowsky Krewen 1904 15 97%
22. Jossel Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 9 97%
23. Leidel Milikowsky Kosewe 1903 21 97%
24. Liebe Milikowsky Krense, Russia 1906 17 97%
25. Mere Milikowsky Wiszniewo 1907 3 97%
26. Meyer Milikowsky Kalisch 1905 9 97%
27. Mina Milikowsky Kalisch 1905 8 97%
28. Rachele Milikowsky Kalisch 1905 8 97%
29. Rebekka Milikowsky Kalisch 1905 37 97%
30. Riwke Milikowsky Krewe, Russia 1910 11 97%
31. Riwke Milikowsky Wiszniewo 1907 26 97%
32. Selig Milikowsky Wilno, Russia 1913 17 97%
33. Siman Milikowsky Krevo, Russia 1913 52 97%
34. Chaje Ester Milikawski Polanka, Russia 1912 36 96%
35. David Hirsch Milikawski Polanka, Russia 1912 6 96%
36. Leah Milikawski Kassamer 1906 19 96%
37. Rochel Milikawski Polanka, Russia 1912 7 96%



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11. Chjena Berkman Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 19
15. Dweire Berkman Wischnero, Russia 1910 23
60. Selik Berkman Wischnewo, Russia 1910 27
30. Jankel Symcha Berkman Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 16
53. Note Berkman Wiszners, Russia 1911 26
35. Kalmen Berkman Wischevewiz, Russia 1914 18
3. Berka Berkman Gorodok , gov. Vilno , Russia 1913 35
5. Berl Berkman Horodok 1903 22
19. Eschke Berkman Smorgon, Russia 1912 39
20. Ettel Berkman Schaki 1904 20
21. Faiwe Berkman Trabi, Russia 1913 28
23. Frejda Berkman Grodku, Poland 1923 12
24. Gitel Berkman Oszmiana, Poland 1921 25
25. Ida Berkman Wilno, Poland 1923 9
26. Israil Berkman Mimsk, Russia 1912 3
27. Itka Berkman Grodku, Poland 1923 10
28. Jacob Berkman Wilna 1904 34
29. Jankel Berkman Lalossin, Russia 1912 42
30. Jankel Symcha Berkman Wisniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1922 16
31. Jenta Berkman Wilno, Poland 1923 28
32. Jochwed Berkman Nowodwor, Russia 1908 23
33. Josef Berkman Grodku, Poland 1923 0
34. Judes Berkman Grodku, Poland 1923 35

36. Leiba Berkman Mimsk, Russia 1912 11
37. Leibu Berkman Mimsk, Russia 1912 8
38. Leike Berkman Mimsk, Russia 1912 9
39. Leiser Berkman Zodiki, Lietuva 1923 58
40. Leizer Berkman Veisejai, Lithuan 1922 17
41. Leja Berkman Smorgon, Russia 1912 12
50. Mine Berkman Smorgon, Russia 1912 4
51. Minka Berkman Twangorod, Russia 1911 22
52. Mosia Berkman Oszmiana, Poland 1921 23
53. Note Berkman Wiszners, Russia 1911 26
54. Reisel Berkman Kobrin, Russia 1908 5
55. Roza Berkman Rowno, Poland 1921 7
56. Salmon Berkman Kobrin, Russia 1908 7
57. Scheine Berkman Wilno, Russia 1911 36
58. Schloime Berkman Ekaterninoslaff 1906 25
59. Sehie Berkman Warschau, Russia 1910 23
60. Selik Berkman Wischnewo, Russia 1910 27
61. Sora Berkman Szczuczyn, Poland 1923 62
62. Taibe Berkman Dwinsk, Russia 1907 22
63. Taube Berkman Smorgon, Russia 1912 6
64. Zalma Berkman Sierpe, Poland 1923 18



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3. Malke Aliskewitz Wischnewe 1906 25
4. Reine Aliskewitz Wischnewe 1906 0

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157. Chana Rabinowitz Kurenetz, Russia 1910 31
561. Mera Rabinowitz Kurenetz, Russia 1910 6
831. Schmuel Rabinowitz Kurenetz, Russia 1910 9
642. Nechame Rabinowitz Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 35
852. Simche Rabinowitz Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 10
891. Sosse Rabinowitz Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 8
944. Yossif Rabinowitz Wischnewo, Wilna, Russia 1907 3
198. Leiba Rabinowicz Wiszniewo, Pinsk Reg. 1923 17
473. Leib Rabinowitz Korulecz, Russia 1910 57
324. Sonne Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 6
255. Pera Rabinowicz Wilno, Pinskreg 1923 19
70. Yossel Rabinovitz Sevir, Russia 1909 18
327. Sore Rabinowicz Wilna 1906 28
322. Sonia Rabinowicz Wilno, Pinskreg 1923 16
13. Chaie Rabinovitz Slutzk, Russia 1908 2
14. Chaje Rabinovitz Wilno, Russia 1907 25
Maische Rabinovicz Minsk 1903 15
316. Slate Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 5
282. Roche Rabinowicz Wilna 1906 1
Rasche Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 7
825. Schleime Rabinowitz Smargan, Russia 1911 21
Szifre Rabinowitz Korzelic 1906 20
210. Lisa Rabinowicz Minsk, Russia 1913 4
Tamara Rabinowitz Iwje 1903 20
835. Schmul Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 4
224. Milke Rabinowicz Minsk 1904 20
836. Schmul Rabinowitz Wilne 1905 14
199. Leibe Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 2
846. Selig Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1912 36
242. Nissen Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 3
228. Moische Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 53
924. Toibe Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1906 17
485. Leile Rabinowitz Wilna, 1904 24
496. Libe Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 11
Masche Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 3
937. Wolf Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 25
876. Sore Rabinowitz Wilna 1906 14
Meier Rabinowitz Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 4
118. Frume Rabinowicz Toloczyn 1904 21
565. Merl Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1910 19
151. Israel Rabinowicz Wilna 1904 19
566. Merl Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1910 20
612. Morduch Rabinowitz Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 11
121. Gehiffre Rabinowicz Wilna 1905 35
856. Simen Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1907 19
613. Morduck Rabinowitz Wilna 1902 3
633. Nachem Rabinowitz Wilna 1902 16
741. Rochel Leie Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 44
742. Roehe Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1909 57
749. Rosalie Rabinowitz Iwenicz, Russia 1908 20
711. Reisel Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 6
853. Sime Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 25
634. Nachem Rabinowitz Janowo 1907 28
182. Jude... Rabinowicz Minsk, Russia 1913 27
635. Nachmen Rabinowitz Wilna 1903 21
636. Nafeolu Rabinowitz Nonoydwor, Russia 1907 21
187. Kisiel Rabinowicz Kozielec, Russia 1907 18
189. Kusiel Rabinowicz Wilne, Russia 1907 2
870. Sonia Rabinowitz Horodyszcze, Poland 1922 31
637. Naftely Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 3
661. Obraham Rabinowitz Horodisch 1906 6
662. Ohaje Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 2
725. Riwe Rabinowitz Borisew 1903 14
730. Riwke Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 26
734. Roche Rabinowitz Glnbokoe 1906 24
776. Samuel Rabinowitz Horodisch 1906 5
598. Moische Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1914 18
487. Leiser Rabinowitz Fwje, Russia 1910 17
526. Marian Rabinowitz Rashkow, Russia 1913 31
83. Benzien Rabinowitz Borisew 1903 40
98. Bianka Rabinowitz Horodock, Russia 1923 73
112. Braine Rabinowitz Voloczin Mog., Russia 1912 23
225. Eisick Rabinowitz Toloczyn 1904 0
221. Dworihke Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1910 0
239. Ellei Rabinowitz Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 8
126. Chaie Rabinowitz Smorgon, Wilna 1907 38
9. Abraham Rabinowitz Wilno 1906 19
10. Abraham Rabinowitz Wilkow, Russia 1906 5
20. Abram Rabinowitz Borki 1905 26
21. Abram Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 37
22. Abram Rabinowitz Wilno 1906 19
1. Chaje Rabinowitch Branowitz, Russia 1912 17
4. Itzig Rabinowitch Branowitz, Russia 1912 16
23. Abram Rabinowitz Slutzk 1906 5
28. Abram Rabinowitz Gorodok, Russia 1911 13
37. Alter Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 36
41. Aran Rabinowitz Brussilew, Russia 1912 0
244. Nochem Rabinowicz Schaulen, Russia 1912 16
42. Arie Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 11
43. Arke Rabinowitz Lomza 1906 3
62. Basche Rabinowitz Wilna 1905 36
63. Basche Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1907 14
64. Basche Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 4
70. Beer Rabinowitz Witebsk 1904 29
71. Beila Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1910 20
79. Benjormin Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1908 42
100. Blinne Rabinowitz Rudiczew, Russia 1913 16
30. Berko Rabinowicz Smargon, Russia 1907 37
40. Boruch Rabinowicz Wilna 1904 19
106. Boruch Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1904 31
93. Elic Rabinowicz Vilna, Russia 1910 17
90. Eidel Rabinowicz Swiri, Russia 1910 22
76. Choje Rabinowicz born on board 1921 0
48. Chaim Rabinowicz Minsk 1905 15
35. Bir Rabinowicz Minsk 1906 10
38. Bornak Rabinowicz Minsk 1904 21
949. Zlate Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 8
107. Boruch Rabinowitz Iwje 1904 16
125. Chaie Rabinowitz Witebsk, Witebsk 1907 46
143. Chaim Rabinowitz Zosli, Russia 1911 18
154. Chaje Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1907 16
163. Chane Rabinowitz Borissow 1906 17
181. Chave Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 8
182. Chawa Rabinowitz Wilkow, Russia 1906 27
187. Chawel Rabinowitz Minsk 1906 5
188. Cheim Meyer Rabinowitz Smorgon 1903 16
191. Chiene Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1907 19
204. David Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 38
205. David Rabinowitz Saldikow 1906 30
206. David Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1912 29
214. Dobe Rabinowitz Borisew 1903 15
215. Dora Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1907 17
216. Dreise Rabinowitz Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 30
244. Esfir Rabinowitz Fastow, Russia 1909 0
273. Fany Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1914 23
295. Freide Rabinowitz Wilna 1902 5
281. Feige Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1911 18
282. Feige Rabinowitz Gorodok, Russia 1911 37
310. Ftzka Rabinowitz Gorodok, Russia 1911 11
311. Fudel Rabinowitz Molodetzno, Wilno 1907 10
314. Gele Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1913 17
315. Gerno Rabinowitz Lubesche, Russia 1910 16
319. Gittel Rabinowitz Wilna 1902 30
323. Gittel Rabinowitz Minsk, Russia 1911 20
324. Gittel Rabinowitz Maropol, Russia 1912 17
325. Golde Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1909 16
337. Hersch Rabinowitz Wilna 1903 22
348. Hessel Rabinowitz Minsk 1905 18
349. Hillel Rabinowitz Smorgon 1903 15
401. Jache Rabinowitz Wilno, Russia 1912 29
407. Jacob Rabinowitz Grodno, Russia 1917 13
408. Jankel Rabinowitz Minsk 1904 26
423. Jedide Rabinowitz Wilna, Russia 1909 11
427. Jerschon Rabinowitz Smargon 1905 17
97. Elja Rabinowicz Schaulen, Russia 1912 17
1. Chane Rabinowich Schaulen, Kowno 1907 35
2. Jankiel Rabinowich Stolpec, Poland 1923 17
3. Leibe Rabinowich Schaulen, Kowno 1907 1
4. Marjasche Rabinowich Schaulen, Kowno 1907 7
5. Piuches Rabinowich Pogrebitze, Russia 1913 20
439. Joel Rabinowitz Krasne, Russia 1910 39
444. Josef Rabinowitz Smorgan 1904 39
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http://sites.netscape.net/stephenpmorse/ellis.html is a very helpful site for Ellis Island records Alternate Spellings of last names.

Alternate Spelling Matches (20)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Freide Podbaresky Warznewo Vishnevo? 1904 30 97%
2. Gtte Podbaresky Warznewo 1904 3 97%
3. Liebe Podbaresky Warznewo 1904 9 97%
4. Aron Podbereski Wisniora, Russia 1910 17 97%
5. Chaje Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 13 97%
6. Elia Podbereski 1908 97%
7. Enta Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 38 97%
8. Fankel Podbereskin Minsi, Russia 1911 17 97%
9. Izko Podbereski Wilna, russia 1911 19 97%
10. Jacob Podbereski Jerusalem 1900 18 97%
11. Leib Podbereski Berlin, Germany 1923 17 97%
12. Leibu Podbereski Wisniewe, Russia 1914 50 97%
13. Moische Podbereski Jerusalem 1900 17 97%
14. Mordche Podbereskin Minsk, Russia 1910 18 97%
15. Mordche Podbereskin 1910 18 97%
16. Piotr Podbereski Podberszi, Russia 1911 35 97%
17. Rachael Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 8 97%
18. Sara Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 11 97%
19. Sergej Podbereski Ch...elowszy..., Russia 1913 25 97%
20. S...l Podbereski Wilna 1904 16 97%

Alternate Spelling Matches (7)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. David Benimovitz 1896 5 94%
2. Devora Benimovitz Palestine, Jerusalem 1923 65 94%
3. Dobe Benimovitz 1896 11 94%
4. Itke Benimovitz 1896 10 94%
5. Nechanne Benimovitz 1896 40 94%
6. Sevaoi Benimovitz Paris 1906 20 94%
7. Chaim Bunimonitz Bialistoh, Russia 1914 30 94%

Alternate Spelling Matches (28)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Moses Buminovicz 1896 32 96%
2. Abraham Bunimowicz Wilna, Russia 1914 19 92%
3. Achie Bunimowicz Krewiszy 1905 5 92%
4. Aron Bunimowicz Wischnewo, Russia 1911 7 92%
5. Bejla Bunimowicz Milejczyce, Poland 1923 34 92%
6. Cecylja Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 15 92%
7. Chaie Bunimowicz Krewiszy 1905 31 92%
8. Chana Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 55 92%
9. Enia Bunimowicz Milejczyce, Poland 1923 9 92%
10. Feige Bunimowicz Wischnewo, Russia 1911 43 92%
11. Gawriel Bunimowicz Wischnewo, Russia 1911 15 92%
12. Jankiel Bunimowicz Milejczyce, Poland 1923 8 92%
13. Kalman Bunimowicz Troloszin 1905 16 92%
14. Marjam Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 22 92%
15. Mojzesz Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 26 92%
16. Mordeha Bunimowicz Biabtystok, Poland 1921 60 92%
17. Mordehe Bunimowicz Bialystek, Poland 1921 59 92%
18. Mordehy Bunimowicza Bialystok, Poland 1921 60 92%
19. Mordice Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 65 92%
20. Owsej Bunimowicz Wilna, Russia 1912 21 92%
21. Rachel Bunimowicz Wilejka, Poland 1921 20 92%
22. Rachel Bunimowicz Wolozna 1904 28 92%
23. Rachill Bunimowicz Slonim, Poland 1924 19 92%
24. Rywha Bunimowicz Biabtystok, Poland 1921 53 92%
25. Rywke Bunimowicz Bialystek, Poland 1921 52 92%
26. Rywke Bunimowicza Bialystok, Poland 1921 53 92%
27. Szejna Bunimowicz Milejczyce, Poland 1923 6 92%
28. Szmul Bunimowicz Milejczyce, Poland 1923 7 92%
. Codik Bunimowich Minsk, Poland 1920 36
1. Gershow Buninowiz Wilna 1898 28 93%
2. Maria Bunimovich Caracas, Venezuela 1917 20 92%

Alternate Spelling Matches (49)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Basche Rugowin Kowns 1902 15 97%
2. Abraham Ragowin London 1904 40 96%
3. Baruch Ragowin 1896 20 96%
4. Chaie Ragowin Wishuny, Russia 1910 32 96%
5. Chaim Ragowin Wishuny, Russia 1910 7 96%
6. Chaim Ragowin London 1904 36 96%
7. Chaje Ragowin 1894 6 96%
8. Chane Ragowin Wischu, Russia 1910 9 96%
9. Dobrusche Ragowin Wischu, Russia 1910 10 96%
10. Dwore Ragowin Horadok 1906 23 96%
11. Efraim Ragowin Wolosen, Russia 1907 22 96%
12. Efroim Ragowin Bealystok 1906 6 96%
13. Eselike Ragowin Woloszyn 1905 20 96%
14. Ester Ragowin Wilna 1904 40 96%
15. Feige Ragowin Wischu, Russia 1910 11 96%
16. Freide Ragowin 1894 28 96%
17. Frome Ragowin 1896 9 96%
18. Hene Ragowin Minsk, Russia 1914 18 96%
19. Hirsch Ragowin Slabodka 1904 27 96%
20. Iser Ragowin Woloczin 1900 7 96%
21. Israel Ragowin Ulany 1899 20 96%
22. Itze Ragowin 1894 8 96%
23. Itzehok Ragowin 1896 17 96%
24. Itzrock Ragowin Woloszna 1904 21 96%
25. Jassel Ragowin Woloszyn, Russia
26. Josze Ragowin 1896 54 96%
27. Laser Ragowin Wilna 1901 18 96%
28. Leib Ragowin Minsk, Russia 1913 19 96%
29. Leib Ragowin Bealystok 1906 9 96%
30. Leib Ragowin 1896 8 96%
31. Leib Ragowin Wolosin 1904 34 96%
32. Leiser Ragowin Kowno 1906 18 96%
33. Liebe Ragowin Bealystok 1906 32 96%
34. Mariasche Ragowin 1896 50 96%
35. Morduch Ragowin Wilna 1905 20 96%
36. Pinkas Ragowin Twioretz 1901 40 96%
37. Rachel Ragowin Wilna 1905 11 96%
38. Rachel Ragowin Woloczin 1900 15 96%
39. Salamon Ragowin Wilna 1904 19 96%
40. Salomon Ragowin Horadok 1906 1 96%
41. Sara Ragowin Wilna 1905 18 96%
42. Sarah Ragowin Woloczin 1900 49 96%
43. Schlome Ragowin 1896 28 96%
44. Sone Ragowin Woloczin 1900 13 96%
45. Sore Ragowin Osmin, Rus. 1908 19 96%
46. Sore Ragowin Bealystok 1906 8 96%
47. Sosse Ragowin Wischu, Russia
6. Ilzko Perskij Wol... 1907 21
7. Chasche Perskin Smorgon 1903 18
8. Frume Perskin Heumen, Russia 1907 20
9. Helen Perskin Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922 11
10. Henrietta Perskin Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922 34
11. Henry Perskin Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922 9
12. Israel Perskin Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922 34
13. Julie Perskin... 1910 12
14. G.S. Persking 1903 48
15. Harris Perskiy Santos, Barzil 1916 23
Alternate Spellings of PERSKI (3)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Jan ...erski Sowan 1907 26 97%
2. Marianna ...erski 1897 19 97%
3. Israel Parski Ganrow 1905 29 97%







Alternate Spellings of KRAMNIK (3)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Mordche Krammik Janowo 1906 21 97%
2. Anna Kramnic Grodno, Russia 1914 17 97%
3. Wladslaw Kramnic Grodno, Russia 1914 21 97%
1. Moiselic Kramnick Sclibo 1905 32
Close Matches (1)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Chayhe Kramnicky 1894 22
Alternate Spellings of KRAMNICK (3)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Edna Krannick 1910 23 97%
2. Anna Kramnic Grodno, Russia 1914 17 96%
Alternate Spellings of SOSENSKI (13)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Alexander Sosanski Komarniki, Galicy 1909 37 97%
2. Bezian Sosanski Freilow 1904 30 97%
3. Leon Sosanski Kamarniki, Galicia 1910 25 97%
1. Dworce Sosansky Shea 1902 16 97%
Alternate Spellings of TOROV (2)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Hampartines Torof Turck 1905 26 97%
2. Flia Turov Zalyzi, Russia 1914 30 97%
Close Matches (309)
1. Abram Aaron Turow Neswitz 1899 20
2. Aron Turow Minsk, Russia 1910 21
3. Audoni. Turow Lanki, Russia 1912 20
4. Boris Turow Zalushe, Russia 1913 24
5. Cire Turow Slutzle 1903 35
6. Francisek Turow Elisbeth NJ, America 1910 43
7. Golde Turow Radonnpl, Russia 1911 20
8. Golde Turow 1911
9. Iakow Turow Faturia, Russia 1913 23
10. Ivan Turow Zalastye, Russia 1914 28
11. Jacow Turow Yalnshie, Russia 1914 21
12. Joel Turow Slutzle 1903 9
13. Leib. Turow Smorgon 1904 30
14. Leon Turow Zalyzi, Russia 1914 22
15. Mendel Turow Slutzle 1903 11
16. Michail Turow Saluskya, Russia 1912 21
17. Pawel Turow Zalushje, Russia 1913 18
18. Sophia Turow Lutcza 1900 22
19. Vikifor Turow Zaluslye 1914 28
20. Wasily Turow 1910 24
21. Welwel Turow Slutzle 1903 5
26. Basie Turowetzki Czernobin, Russia 1913 19
27. Tewel Turowetzky Mosyr, Russia 1910 27
28. Meer Turowezki Chabze, Russia 1912 49
29. Teresa Turowice Housatonic, Mass. 1910 27
30. Wawrzemec Turowice 1905 27
31. Agatha Turowicz Puwalki 1905 4
32. Alex Turowicz 1896 34
33. Anastasia Turowicz Sherlaki, Russia 1914 52
34. Andrzey Turowicz Drosginski 1905 38
35. Anna Turowicz Scherlaki , gov. Welna , Russia 1913 20
36. Deomid Turowicz Kata, Russia 1911 22
37. Ewa Turowicz 1907 20
38. Ignacz Turowicz Butoninonz, Russia 1907 19
39. Josef Turowicz Krasnik, Russia 1912 40
40. Karus Turowicz Pudczyn, Russia 1908 28
41. Kazemir Turowicz Suwalki 1905 45
42. Marianna Turowicz Puwalki 1905 45
43. Marya Turowicz ..., Galicia 1912 19
44. Marya Turowicz Sarzyna, Galicia 1912 19
45. Nicolaus Turowicz 1896 19
46. Pawel Turowicz Shernaki, Russia 1911 25
47. Sigmund Turowicz Mantati, Russia 1912 19
48. Stanislaw Turowicz Rzeczyce, Russia 1910 36
49. Wladislav Turowicz Krasna, Russia 1906 19
50. Yan Turowicz Puwalki 1905 20
151. Francisek Turowski Risko 1904 25
152. Francisek Turowski Suwalki, Russia 1914 19
153. Franciszek Turowski Kalinow, Russia 1913 30
154. Franciszek Turowski Sojezyn B., Russia 1913 18
155. Francziszek Turowski Polish, Russia 1907 33
156. Frank Turowski Rutki nowe 1900 24
157. Frantz Turowski Copenhagen, Denmark 1919 35
158. Franz Turowski 1892 36
159. Franz Turowski Strzelcowizna, Russia 1907 20
160. Franz Turowski Masowita Lomsinsk, Russia 1913 20
161. Franzischek Turowski U. S. A. 1908 26
162. Franzisek Turowski ..., Russia 1914 19
163. Franzisetk Turowski 1897 16
164. Franziszek Turowski Kosowka, Russia 1909 32
165. Heinrich Turowski Srensk 1907 18
166. Heinrich Turowski 1924 24
167. Helena Turowski Grabowo, Russia 1910 24
168. Herschel Turowski Kiew, Russia 1914 3
169. Hinide Turowski Minisk, Russia 1914 19
170. Ignati Turowski Huty, Russia 1907 28
171. Ilia Turowski Kaninki, Russia 1907 31
172. Jadwiga Turowski Lamana Grondi, Russia 1912 3
173. Jakob Turowski Roslowki, Russia 1906 21
174. Jakob Turowski Koslowka, Russia 1910 24
175. Jan Turowski Scierbrue 1901 21
176. Jan Turowski Lorczogowo, Russia 1906 35
177. Jan Turowski Jeziorki, Russia 1909 36
178. Jan Turowski Kowel, Russia 1910 18
179. Jan Turowski Luboniec, Louiza, Russia 1910 18
180. Jan Turowski Grabowo, Russia 1910 26
181. Janina Turowski Lamana Grondi, Russia 1912 0
182. Josef Turowski Rutkinown 1900 23
183. Josef Turowski Sobarowka 1905 22
184. Josef Turowski Izbic 1906 43
185. Josef Turowski Monasterzyska 1907 37
186. Josefa Turowski Soblaki 1902 32
187. Josefa Turowski Stary Samber 1905 9
188. Josif Turowski Minisk, Russia 1914 19
189. Jossel Turowski Owernez, Russia 1907 27
190. Jossel Turowski Radomysl, Russia 1910 17
191. Julian Turowski Uniesk, Russia 1910 36
192. JULYAN TUROWSKI OLAWNY 1898 19
193. Karol Turowski Blonawy, Russia 1910 40
194. Kazmierz Turowski Konopki, Russia 1912 20
195. Leopold Turowski 1893 28
196. Luve Turowski Boguslaw, Russia 1910 8
197. Marcil Turowski Pazuski, Russia 1913 17
198. Maria Turowski Posen 1903 23
199. Maryan Turowski Huty, Russia 1910 25
200. Michail Turowski Baranki, Russia 1913 20
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. L. Turowa 1896 18
2. Isak Turowaara Ofver Tornea, Sweden 1909 23
3. Sofia T. Turowaara Finland 1904 15
4. Jan Turowecki Lup... 1904 20
5. Sofia Turowecki Plack 1904 22
Alternate Spellings of TUROW (3)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival Relevancy
1. Jacob Torow 1892 28 97%
2. Michael Torow Mikalaczerin, Russia 1909 19 97%
3. Victor Turrow Westburg,Long Island 1924 5 97%




click here for http://sites.netscape.net/stephenpmorse/ellis.html
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VIEW: Exact Matches Only Close Matches Only Alternate Spellings Only Summary Results



To see other kinds of matches, click the buttons above. To view a passenger's record, click that passenger's name. Or, to refine your search, click "Edit" in any category in the Passenger Search Profile previous 25 next 25

Exact Matches (61)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Aron Dawidson Hastan, Roumania 1913 16
2. Awrum Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 12
3. Basse Dawidson Mitau, Russia 1909 27
4. Baszewa Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 18
5. Benegon D26. Hermann Dawidson Dorohoi, Romania 1907 30
27. Isreal Dawidson Manchester, England 1920 41
28. Itzig Dawidson Harloin, Romania 1912 48
29. Itzik Dawidson Hastan, Roumania 1913 55
30. Jankel Dawidson Kanatogs 1906 19
31. Jankel Dawidson Szypolytko, Russia 1907 30
32. Jankel Dawidson Pawlograd, Russia 1923 19
33. John Dawidson 1893 42
34. John Dawidson Beloe Cerkow, Russia 1907 20
35. John Dawidson 1914 38
36. Kasimir Dawidson Artemowicz, Russia 1911 26
37. Klara Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 9
38. Leib Dawidson Paris, France 1909 21
39. Leon Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 38
40. Lucius Dawidson Lemburg, Poland 1921 29
41. Mendel Dawidson Nowogrod, Russia 1921 15
42. Mina Dawidson Fasniki, Witebsk 1908 24
43. Moise Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 9
44. Mojsche Dawidson Nowogrod, Russia 1913 26
45. Mojsze Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 9
46. Mordche D'awidson Wisenewo 1907 22
47. Motki Dawidson Toloczin, Russia 1912 21
48. Nechama Dawidson Rogaczew, Russia 1922 36
49. Nochem Dawidson Wisnowe, Russia 1913 22
50. Perla Dawidson Ostrogu, Poland 1923 38

. Ronia Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 16
52. Rysia Dawidson Wolozyn, , Poland 1923 21
53. Samuel Dawidson Wisnowir 1903 19
54. Scheine Dawidson Trab, Russia 1913 19
55. Schmelek Dawidson Robly, Russia 1912 35
56. Sore Dawidson Wisnowe, Russia 1907 20
57. Sura Dawidson Warsaw, Poland 1921 21
58. Szepszel Dawidson Wisniewo, Russia 1922 14
59. Taube Dawidson Kawno 1893 26
60. Tcze Dawidson Osnirany, Russia 1906 18
61. William Dawidson Tauraggen 1905 30




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Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Alter Zusman Buenos Aires, Argentina 1923 35
2. Anne Zusman Magelew 1906 4
3. Bejla Zusman Grodek, Poland 1921 15
4. Benjamin Zusman Grodek, Poland 1921 10
5. Chaie Zusman 1908 18
6. Chajka Zusman Grodek, Poland 1921 16
7. Clara Zusman Jassy 1902 17
8. David Zusman Jaffa, Palestine 1923 0
9. Dora Zusman Jaffa, Palestine 1923 29
10. Dwose Zusman Nowjovo Sweisky, Russia 1913 30
11. Edward Zusman London, England 1908 23
12. Estera Zusman Buenos Aires, Argentina 1923 27
13. Eta Zusman Havana, Cuba 1924 58
14. Ettel Zusman Ewtipol, Russia 1910 28
15. Faigel Zusman Baranowicze, Pinsk Reg. 1923 19
16. Fude Zusman London 1906 25
17. Furyna Liba Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 42
18. Gitel Zusman Grodek, Poland 1921 13
19. Hana Zusman Jassy 1921 20
20. Icek Zusman Warsaw, Poland 1923 9
21. Isaak Zusman Buenos Aires, Argentina 1923 0
22. Itke Zusman Nowjovo Sweisky, Russia 1913 5
23. Itzko Zusman Iwie, Russia 1912 21
24. Joni Zusman Jassy 1921 17
25. Joseph Zusman B. Aires, Argentine 1923 45
26. Jossel Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 9
27. Jossif Zusman London 1906 28
28. Kuta Zusman Jassy 1921 15
29. Leo Zusman Begarest, Roumany 1922 27
30. Liba Zusman Juszyny Wilna, Russia 1921 22
31. Louis Zusman Magelew 1906 0
32. Mates Zusman Jassy 1921 62
33. Mathan Zusman Magelew 1906 30
34. Mina Zusman Jassy 1902 14
35. Mire Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 7
36. Moishe Zusman Nowjovo Sweisky, Russia 1913 12
37. Morris Zusman England, London 1907 37
38. Moses Zusman Grodno, Russia 1906 26
39. Moses Zusman Jaffa, Palestine 1923 8
40. Mozes Zusman Wilna, Poland 1923 18
41. Myer Zusman London, England 1915 21
42. Neche Zusman Ewtipol, Russia 1910 3
43. Neche Zusman Nowjovo Sweisky, Russia 1913 5
44. Rachel Zusman Grodek, Poland 1921 36
45. Rebocka Zusman Magelew 1906 28
46. Rescha Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 15
47. Ruchel Zusman Warschau, Russia 1912 19
48. Rywea Zusman Buenos Aires, Argentina 1923 3
49. Selma Leje Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 13
50. Sigmund Zusman Jassy 1902 23
51. Sisla Zusman Juszyny Wilna, Russia 1921 20
52. Sofia Zusman Jassy 1902 21
53. Sonia Zusman Warsaw, Poland 1923 19
54. Sora Zusman Juszyny Wilna, Russia 1921 50
55. Srul Zusman Jassy 1904 21
56. Srul Zusman Ewtipol, Russia 1910 6
57. Szloma Zusman Buenos Aires, Argentina 1923 32
58. Tusza Zusman Wilna, Poland 1923 19
59. Virhia Zusman Jassy 1921 56
60. Welwad Zusman Tatavenai, Gov. Lovno, Lithuania 1920 11
61. Zlata Zusman Warsaw, Poland 1923 14
62. Zysel Zusman Satanow 1921 21
1. Mrs. Harold Susman New Haven, Conn 1913 57
2. .rnea Susman 1903 20
3. A. Susman Southampton 1897 38
4. Abe Susman Altkenstantin 1904 24
5. Abraham Susman Russia 1904 23
6. Ancel Susman 1903 17
7. Andres Susman Austria 1911 28
8. Anna Susman Berve, Hungary 1909 38
9. Anna Susman Lenzek, Austria 1913 21
10. Anna Susman Berve, Hungary 1913 42
11. Annetbe Susman 1913 57
12. Anny Susman London 1902 23
13. Anton Susman Krain 1902 18
14. Benjamin Susman Minsk, Russia 1912 20
15. Benny Susman London 1902 0
16. Betsy Susman London 1904 36
17. Betty Susman Jassy 1902 32
18. Blume Susman Wisznewo 1901 23
19. Chaia Susman Ptitz, Russia 1923 35
20. Chaie Susman Minsk 1906 23
21. Chane Susman London 1905 25
22. Chane Susman Wisnewo, Russia 1910 18
23. Charle Susman Liverpool 1903 37
24. David Susman Dublin 1903 0
25. Dawid Susman Jschonostre 1907 15




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May 16,2001
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http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_pages/vstories_forget.html
I would like to thank Charles Straczynski for letting me post his story on the Vishnevo site. Charles is a Christian man who was born in the U.S.A in 1929. He and his family came to visit other members of the family who lived in the Vishnevo area in 1939. the Russian took control of the area shortly after they arrived, the family could not return to the U.S.A for six years and Charles was a Witness to the horrors after the German invaded in 1941.
click here to read Charles story;
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Exact Matches (18)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Mrs. D. Dudman 1907 45
2. Arthur Dudman 1895 21
3. Calek Dudman Wiszniew, Poland 1921 60 Vishnevo
4. Chaini Dudman London 1904 27
5. Cuthbert Dudman London, England 1916 26
6. Cuthbert Dudman 1917 27
7. Cuthbert Dudman 1918 28
8. Eva Dudman 1909
9. George Henderson Dudman Finchley, England 1914 63
10. Helen Dudman London, England 1913 29
11. Henderson Dudman Post Office, Lansdowne, Pa. 1923 6
12. Hersch Dudman Scharogrod, Russia 1911 15
13. Hirsch Dudman Rakof 1904 22 Rakov
14. Leonard H Dudman London, England 1913 21
15. Leonard H Dudman Post Office, Lansdowne, Pa. 1923 31
16. Mary Dudman Finchley, England 1914 64
17. Nikoli Dudman Budim 1898 37
18. Nissen Dudman Wischnewo, Russia 1913 19 Visahnevo




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Exact Matches (29)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Abraham Rogowin Vglosin 1900 18 Volozhin
2. Abram Rogowin Wallossen, Russia 1910 28 Volozhin
3. Boruch Rogowin Minsk 1906 3 Minsk
4. Brome Rogowin 1896 0
5. Chaim Rogowin 1892 15
6. Chaim Rogowin Wobayn 1904 19 Volozhin?
7. Chain Rogowin Lubec, Russia 1913 9
8. Dweire Rogowin Palazin, Russia 1908 22 Volozhin
9. Feige Rogowin Minsk 1906 30 Minsk
10. Frume Rogowin Wilna 1902 19 Vilna
11. Gitel Rogowin Bariseski, Russia 1910 17
12. Gittel Rogowin Wolosyn 1905 19 Volozhin
13. Hersch Rogowin Minsk 1906 5 Minsk
14. Hersch Rogowin Wolosin, Russia 1909 25 Volozhin
15. Hirsch Rogowin Meinsk, Russia 1908 16 Minsk
16. Inde Rogowin Wilna 1902 54
17. Judel-Morduch Rogowin Wilna, Russia 1921 70
18. Leib Rogowin Wolozin 1902 17 Volozhin
19. Leib Rogowin Melna 1904 20
20. Leiser Rogowin U.S.A. 1908 25
21. Leizer Rogowin Satzk, Russia 1912 17
22. Lore Rogowin Gorodok, Russia 1911 24 horodok
23. Mirke Rogowin Minsk, Russia 1913 23
24. Nossen Rogowin Hamburg 1897 17
25. Rochel Rogowin 1896 2
1. Abram Chaim Rogovin Jaffa, Turkey 1912 50
2. Bertha Rogovin New York, N.Y. 1923 26
3. Moises Rogovin Paris, France 1923 58
4. Moses Rogovin Munchen, Germany 1912 46
5. Sarah Rogovin Volscin 1899 18 Volozhin


1. Arthur Rogozin Timkowiezy, Russia 1909 3
2. Chawa Rogozin Molodezus, Russia 1912 22
3. Cheje Rogozin 1896 19
4. Eli Rogozin Minsk 1904 31
5. Jacow Rogozin Chinell, Russia 1913 30
6. Nechemyd Rogozin Danitowicz 1906 19
7. Perla Rogozin Warszawa, Poland 1922 18
8. Rosa Rogozin Timkowiezy, Russia 1909 25
9. Sara Rogozin Morodesti, Poland 1922 14
10. Szloma Rogozin Warszawa, Poland 1922 17



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Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Aron Podbereski Wisniora, Russia 1910 17 (Vishnevo)
2. Chaje Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 13
3. Elia Podbereski 1908
4. Enta Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 38
5. Izko Podbereski Wilna, russia 1911 19 (Vilna)
6. Jacob Podbereski Jerusalem 1900 18
7. Leib Podbereski Berlin, Germany 1923 17
8. Leibu Podbereski Wisniewe, Russia 1914 50 (Vishnevo)
9. Moische Podbereski Jerusalem 1900 17
10. Piotr Podbereski Podberszi, Russia 1911 35
11. Rachael Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 8
12. Sara Podbereski Lubtz, Poland 1920 11
13. Sergej Podbereski Ch...elowszy..., Russia 1913 25
14. S...l Podbereski Wilna 1904 16 Vilna


Exact Matches (11)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Anton Podberesky Hileka, Russia 1912 17 (Vileyka)
2. Isidore Podberesky 1922
3. Itzko Podberesky Wischnewa 1907 24 Vishnevo
4. Jankel Podberesky U.S.A., New York 1912 29
5. Leibe Podberesky Leiton, Russia 1922 60
6. Mary Podberesky Greenock, Scotland 1910 18
7. NORDUCH PODBERESKY HEBREW 1905 20
8. Rasche Podberesky Woloshin, Russia 1912 41 Volozhin
9. Sora-Matle Podberesky Woloshin, Russia 1912 10 Volozhin
10. Yenta Podberesky Leiton, Russia 1922 20
11. Zundel Podberesky Grodus, Russia 1912 20 Horodk


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http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/ Matches (142)
Name of Passenger Residence Arrived Age on Arrival
1. Aaron Persky Lutz 1902 28
2. Abrahan Persky Hilna 1905 9
3. Abram Persky Kinkow 1899 18
4. Abram Persky Lebedove 1900 31 Lebadove
5. Abram Persky . . . 1905 26
6. Abram Persky ... 1906 4
7. Abram Persky Troje, Russia 1911 34
8. Abram Persky Wolozin, Russia 1914 39 Volzhin
9. Aisik Persky Woloshin, Wilno 1907 14 Volozhin
10. Alexander Persky London 1898 36
11. Alte Persky Valosne 1905 28 Volozhin
12. Alter Persky 1894 25
13. Ami Persky Kinkow 1899 2
14. Anna Persky Bikas 1903 23
15. Anna Persky Bikas, Hungary 1914 28
16. Anna Persky Bujakovo, Cz. Slov. 1920 32
17. Anschel Persky 1895 16
18. Aron Persky ... 1906 0
19. Beile Persky Woloskin, Russia 1909 26 Volozhin
20. Beile Persky Waloschm, Russia 1913 17 Volozhin
21. Benjamin Persky ... 1905 22
22. Benzian Persky Wolozyo, Russia 1912 21 Volozhin
23. Benziow Persky Dwinsk 1906 17
24. Bere Persky 1894 16
25. Berl Persky Rodiskewitz 1906 16 Radoshkovichi
26. Bertha Persky Liverpool, England 1907 37
27. Bess Persky New Haven, Conn. 1921 26
28. Chaie Persky ... 1906 27
29. Chaim Persky 1894 16
30. Chaim Persky Minsk 1902 23 Minsk
31. Chaim Persky Dsou...y 1906 17
32. Chaim Persky Woloshin, Wilno 1907 25 Vilozhin
33. Chain Persky Wilno, Russia 1907 15 Vilna
34. Chaje Persky Wilna 1892 20 Vilna
35. Chaje Persky Krawec, Russia 1910 16
36. Chame Persky Hilna 1905 26
37. David Persky Wolozin 1893 8 Volozhin
38. David Persky Izinitz, Russia 1913 22
39. Dinke Persky Wolozen 1902 16 Volozhin
40. Dresig Persky Sucargan, Russia 1893 30 Smorgon?
41. Elje Persky Liban 1898 22 Luban
42. Ette Persky Smargow 1906 17 Smorgon
43. Fane Persky Kaharlick, Prod Kiev, Russia 1907 21
44. Fani Persky Kinkow 1899 4
45. Fanny Persky New Haven, Conn. 1922 57
46. Feiel Persky Wolosin, Russia 1906 1 Volozhin
47. Feige Persky Rodiskewitz 1906 17 Radoshkovichi
48. Freide Persky Osmany 1905 19 Oshmany
49. Freude Persky Woloszyn 1900 20 Volozhin
50. Gertrude Persky New Haven, Conn. 1922 17
51. Gill Persky 1896 40
52. Gutte Persky Osmiany 1907 5 Oshmany
Harry Persky Liverpool, England 1907 17
54. Henne Persky Wolozin 1893 31 Volozhin
55. Hinda Persky Oszmania, n/Wilna, Poland 1921 13 Oshmany
56. Hirsch Persky Wilna 1898 16 Vilna
57. Hirsch Persky Russia 1906 14
58. Isaac Persky Oszmania, n/Wilna, Poland 1921 50 Oshmany
59. Isaak Persky Libedowe 1903 21 Lebadove
60. Isak Persky 1903
61. Israel Persky Dwinsk 1906 22
62. Israel Persky Kowno 1907 25
63. Itzko Persky Walosse, Russia 1910 41 Volozhin
64. Jacob Persky Liverpool, England 1907 5
65. Jacob Persky Vorchmano, Russia 1907 20
66. Janos Persky Bikas 1903 25
67. Josef Persky Russia 1904 42
68. Josef Persky Wologin, Russia 1910 46 Volozhin
69. Jossel Persky Wolosin, Russia 1914 18 Volozhin
70. Keunsch Persky Wilna, Russia 1906 19 Vilna
71. Leah Persky 1894 33
72. Leib Persky 1894 10
73. Leib Persky Wilna 1898 24 Vilna
74. Leib Persky Rodiskewitz 1906 15 Radoshkovichi
75. Leib Persky Minsk, Russia 1913 21 Minsk
76. Leile Persky Staria Dorogy, Russia 1907 16
77. Lillian Persky London 1907 5
78. Lina Persky Kinkow 1899 6
79. Lore Persky Seventz 1906 20
80. Louie Persky Liverpool, England 1907 9
81. Maier Persky Smargon, Russia 1910 60 Smorgon
82. Marie Persky Smargon, Russia 1910 60 Smorgon
83. Marisoche Persky Hilna 1905 7
84. Max Persky Bakol, Russia 1911 17
85. Meir Persky 1894 1
86. Mena Persky Sucargan, Russia 1893 8 Smorgon?
87. Mendel Persky Staria Dorogy, Russia 1907 27
88. Meyer Persky New York 1922 23
89. Moses Persky London 1905 22
90. Mowscha Persky Wolosin 1904 38 Volozhin
91. Mowshel Persky Osmiany 1907 3 Oshmany
92. Mowske Persky Liban 1904 30 Luban
93. Mowsse Persky Warschau, Russia 1913 20
94. Myer Persky Liverpool, England 1907 38
95. Nosan Persky Kaharlick, Prod Kiev, Russia 1907 3
96. Owser Persky Minsk 1892 18 Minsk
97. Pedro Persky 1920 21
98. Philip Persky New York City 1924 29
99. Pinkus Persky Hilna 1905 5
100. Rafael Persky Suiorgan 1905 24 Smorgon?
101. Raphael Persky Bialystock 1898 18
102. Rawen Persky ... 1906 3
103. Reise L. Persky Wolosin, Russia 1906 23 Volozhin
104. Risehe Persky Wolosyn 1905 49 Volozhin
105. Ris...ke Persky Walozyn, Russia 1910 17 Volozhin
106. Riwke Persky Wolosyn 1905 8 Volozhin
107. Riwke Persky Staria Dorogy, Russia 1907 18
108. Rochel Persky 1895 22
109. Rochel Persky Osmiany, Russia 1916 17 Oshmany
110. Salm. Persky Waloszin 1906 50 Volozhin
111. Samuel Persky 1896 9
112. Samuel Persky New Haven, Conn. 1921 34
113. Sara Persky Kinkow 1899 26
114. Sare Persky Smargow 1906 18 Smorgon
115. Scheine Persky Osmiany 1907 6 Oshmany
116. Schifra Persky 1894 7
117. Schimen Persky Valosne 1905 3 Volozhin
118. Schmuel Persky Kaharlick, Prod Kiev, Russia 1907 27
119. Schmul Persky Minsk 1906 20 Minsk
120. Schmul Persky Wolosin, Russia 1914 16 volozhin
121. Selig Persky Minsk, Russia 1910 19 Minsk
122. Sore Persky Osmiany 1907 29 Oshmany
123. Sure Persky Wologin, Russia 1910 16 Volozhin
124. Taube Persky 1895 9
125. Ullisses Persky 1924 20
126. Ulyses Persky S. Paulo, Brazi 1921 16
127. Voriche Persky Walarzaw, Russia 1908 20
128. Wesche Persky Wolosyn 1905 9 Volozhin
129. Wigdor Persky Smargon, Russia 1910 65 Smorgon
130. William Persky New York 1920 27
131. William Persky 1920 27
132. William Persky 1920 27
133. William Persky 1920 27
134. William Persky 1920 28
135. william persky 1921 27
136. William Persky 1921 28
137. William Persky 1921 29
138. William Persky 1921 27
139. William Persky 1921 20
140. Wolf Persky Sucargan, Russia 1893 10 Smorgon?
141. Yosse Persky Valosne 1905 5 Volozhin
142. Zire Persky Wologin, Russia 1910 16 Volzhin

1. Abram Perski Radischkowitz 1904 22 Radoshkovichi
2. Adam Perski Turopin, Russia 1912 24
3. Basche Perski Lebdwi 1906 9 Lebadove
4. Bornch Perski Felschi, Russia 1912 24
5. Chafe Perski 1893 30
6. Chaid Perski Wolozin Wilna, Russia 1913 48 Volozhin
7. Chaie Perski Lebdwi 1906 53 Lebabove
8. Chajem Perski 1893 35
9. Channe Perski 1893 2
10. Czeslaw Perski Rempzy, Russia 1910 18
11. David Perski Minsk 1905 21 Volozhin
12. Dawid Perski Wisznewi 1905 16 vishnevo
13. Dwojre Perski 1893 16
14. Elia Perski Minsk, Russia 1914 19 Minsk
15. Elie Perski Moleslew 1906 18
16. Esrail Perski 1893 7
17. Ester Perski 1893 34
18. Esther Perski 1893 0
19. Feiga Perski Maloszny, Poland 1923 66 Volozhin?
20. Franciszek Perski Turopin, Russia 1913 24
21. Gescha Perski Hogilen, Russia 1914 48
22. Ilona Perski Majdanj, Servian 1921 18
23. Iske Perski Wotosin 1902 18 Volozhin
24. Israel Perski Santos, Brazil 1916 15
25. Jacob Perski Oschmani 1903 30 Oshmany
26. Jacob Pers...ki Pula 1904 6
27. Josef Perski Wolozin, Russia 1909 40 Volozhin
28. Josef Perski Wolorzy, Russia 1909 28 Volozhin
29. Judel Perski Iwanitz 1904 30 Ivaniz
30. Keim Perski Warschau 1905 22
31. Leie Perski 1893 46
32. Lejzer Perski Welezyn, Poland 1922 13 Volozhin
33. Liebe Pers...ki Pula 1904 11
34. Malke Perski 1893 35
35. Matys Perski Minsk, Russia 1923 16 Minsk
36. Max Perski Minsk 1904 29 Minsk
37. Mendel Pers...ki Pula 1904 37
38. Mendel Perski Minsk, Russia 1923 33 Minsk
39. Menuch Perski 1893 4
40. Mikolaj Perski Turnpin, Russia 1912 45
41. Mikolaj Perski Kolonia, Poland 1922 55
42. Mortche Perski Shaweberg, Russia 1907 30
43. Nissen Perski 1893 4
44. Peosei Perski Retkowcyzuk, Russia 1907 18 Radoshkovichi
45. Perle Pers...ki Pula 1904 32
46. Rebbecca Pers...ki Pula 1904 9
47. Riwke Perski Osmane, Russia 1908 16 Oshmany
48. Robert Perski 1906 47
49. Salamon Perski Wilna 1902 38 Vilna
50. Salomon Perski 1893 7
51. Schaje Perski 1893 11
52. Schalem Perski Dwalosin 1906 18 Volozhin
53. Schlemine Perski 1893 3
54. Sehmuel Perski 1893 30
55. Sehmul Perski 1893 38
56. Sincida Pers...ki Pula 1904 5
57. Smuel Perski Wizninie, Russia 1912 20 Vishnevo?
58. Sore Perski Wilna 1902 11 Vilna
59. Sore Perski Wilna 1906 32 Vilna
60. Walenty Perski Polok, Russia 1913 46
61. Welwel Perski Wolozin Wilna, Russia 1913 18 Volozhin


click here for http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/
USA -

I received another note from Charles Straczynski,
Charles is a Christian man who was born in the U.S.A in 1929. He and his family came to visit other members of the family who lived in the Vishnevo area in 1939. the Russian took control of the area shortly after they arrived, the family could not return to the U.S.A for six years and Charles was a Witness to the horrors after the German invaded in 1941, here is some of what he wrote in the guest book the first time; " The German killers entered the Ghetto with trucks and when they were filled they took the Jews to the top of the street made them get into 3 or four buildinds, sprayed the buildings with gas and began shooting with machine guns at the ones that tried to get out. The next day the non Jews of visnievo, bogdanowo and others began tearing at the bodies which were almost glued together from the fire and were removing the gold teeth and searched the bodies for other valuables.I don't want to go any further, but I was there when all this happened (I was 13 years old). Since 1992 I traveled to visnievo 5 times and visited the site. I have pictures of the monument. I keep going back to see if it really happened.
I would like to thank Charles for the pictures he sent; here is his othjer note;
or your section of new scenes
I have some pictures of the train station in Bogdanovo, as well as
pictures of a memorial for the Wisniewo martyrs that is at Khatyn
near Minsk and a few other. I notice that Bogdanowo is mentioned
often on the Wiszniewo site. This train station is where Jewish people
were made to work cutting wood in freezing temperature so the Germans
could stay warm.

Also How can I post my side of the Wisniewo story on the Wisniewo
web site's " Wisniewo Stories".

Regards

Charles Straczynski



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USA -

My name (First and family) : Samuel A. Arutt
My URL :
My Email : sarutt@mindspring.com
Age : 80+
Phone, fax etc. (If necessary) : 480-905-3645
Address (If necessary) : 8768 E. via de Dorado Scottsdale, Az. 85258
comments : I am looking for any members of the Arotsky family.Gfather,Leyb,a blacksomith in Smorgon about 1890. His widow,D'vora Zusman (Vishnevo) and all children in the US by 1910

Samuel A. Arutt sarutt@mindspring.com
USA -

The Jewish community has a 700 year history in Belarus. Listed below is a brief survey of some our communities. During the coming months we will be adding more details as community members submit reports and we publish our histories of Belarusian shtetls. In the meantime if you have any specific questions please do not hesitate to contact us at eejhp@yahoo.com. If you would like to write directly to the listed communities please use the form below. We provide a free, two-way translation service.

BARANOVICHI Jewish Religious Community "Beth Israel" Head of the community: Grigory DOROSHEV, tel.45 58 11, Lenina St.20, apt 24 Total number of Jews: 520 The community was formed in August 1992, registered in October 1993. Activities: minion during the week: Shaharit — 9:00, Shabbat — 9:00 There are 2 buildings of former synagogues.

BOBRUISK Jewish Religious Community "Beth Isroel" Head of the community: Solomon GOROSH, Ostrovskogo Str. 52, apt.3 Total number of Jews: 3000 The community was formed in October 1992, registered in January 1993 Activities: minion during the week: Shaharit - 10:00, Shabbat — 9:00 In Bobruisk there are 8 buildings of former synagogues.

BORISOV Jewish Religious Community " Hevra Tegilim " Head of the community: Gary Zarkhin, tel.41 827 Total number of Jews: 650. The community was formed in September 1996, registered in November 1997. Activities: minion only on Fridays- Kabbalat Shabbat, a distribution committee. There are 2 buildings of former synagogues and a Jewish cemetery. 26 Jews live in Borisov district.

BREST Jewish Religious Community " Hevra Tegilim " Head of the community: Anatoly SHAPIRO, tel.46 39 82 Total number of Jews: 600 Number of aid recipients: 152 The community was formed in March 1992, registered in June 1992. Activities: Shabbat prayers. There are 2 extant buildings of former synagogues.

GOMEL Jewish Religious Community Head of the community: Leonid DIMENSTEIN, tel. 53 44 05, Krasnoarmeyskaya St., 1-a Total number of Jews: 7600. The community was formed in March 1992, registered in January 1993. Activities: minyan during the week: Shaharit — 9:00, Shabbat — 9:00, Kabbalat Shabbat. There is a building of a synagogue.

GRODNO Jewish Religious Community Head of the community: Tsvi Khosid, tel.44 07 95, 17 September St.14/1 - 1 Total number of Jews: 1280. The community was formed in May 1992, registered in September 1993. Activities: Shaharit — 9:30 during the week, Shabbat — 9:00. There are 2 buildings of former synagogues and a Jewish cemetery There are 2 buildings of former synagogues and a Jewish cemetery.

KALINKOVICHI Jewish Religious Community. Head of the community: Yakov ERENBURG, tel.2 03 57, Pervomayskaya St. 2, apt.22. Total number of Jews: 800 The community was formed in June 1992, registered in December 1992. Activities: minion during the week:" Maariv" — 18:00, Shabbat — 10:00. There is a synagogue.

MINSK Jewish Religious Community "Beth Isroel" Head of the community: Lazar PINKHASIK, tel.234 56 12, Dauman St., 13-b Total number of Jews: about 40,000. The community was formed in August 1994, registered in May 1995. Activities: minion during the week: Shaharit — 8:30, Shabbat — 9 :00. There are 6 buildings of former synagogues extant.

MOGILEV Jewish Religious Community . Head of the community: Naum IOFFE, tel. 24 77 11, 2nd Krutoy Per., 3 Total number of Jews: 7,500. The community was formed in February 1992, registered in April 1992. Activities: "Kabbalat Shabbat", "Shabbat" — 9:00, Children’s Club . There are 3 buildings of former synagogues extant and a Jewish cemetery.

MOLODECHNO Jewish Religious Community " Hevra Tegilim" Head of the community: Gennady BASKIN Total number of Jews: 1,000 . The community was formed in September 1998, registered in March 1999. Activities:"Kabbalat Shabbat". There is 1 synagogue.

ORSHA Jewish Religious Community "Hevra Tegilim" Head of the community: Semyon RYVKIN, tel. 2 79 08 Total number of Jews: 1,600. The community was formed in July 1998, registered in October 1998. Activities: Shabbat meetings and prayers, a youth club, a library. In Orsha there are 2 buildings of former synagogues extant and a Jewish cemetery.

PINSK Jewish Religious Community "Beth Israel" Head of the community: Iosif LIBERMAN, Tel.243 20, Irkutsko-Pinskoy Divisii St.,12 Total number of Jews: 5,000. The community was formed in September 1992, registered in December 1992. Activities: Prayers during the week- Shahart -9:00 Kabbalat Shabbat Shabbat —9:00 In Pinsk there are 3 buildings of former synagogues extant, a Jewish cemetery. There is a Jewish school and a kosher canteen.

POLOTSK Jewish Religious Community Head of the community: Total number of Jews: 1,000. The community was registered in 1995 registered in Activities: Welfare, Friday night Shabbas.

SLUTSK Jewish Religious Community " Hevra Tegilim " Head of the community: Valery GUZMAN, Total number of Jews: 1,200. The community was formed in August 1998, registered in March 1999. Activities: "Kabbalat Shabbat". There is a synagogue building. BACK TO MAP WRITE TO THE COMMUNITY

VITEBSK Jewish Religious Community Head of the community: Wulf KLECHEVSKY, tel. 44 53 40, Kolkhoznaya St., 4 Total number of Jews: 7,500. The community was formed in November 1992, registered in January 1993. Activities: minion during the week — Shaharit- 8:30, Shabbat — 9:00. There are 2 buildings of former synagogues extant and a Jewish cemetery.
The information is taken from;

http://alltheweb.com/go/43/H/eejhp.tripod.ca/map.htm






TO WRITE TO A COMMUNITY click here
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our grandfather from our father side,Avraham was born in kurenets c 1864 to Chaim Isar Alperovitch. Avraham married Sarale’nee Mekler the daughter of Chava and Aharon Mekler. The children of Sara and Avraham Alperovitch were; Orzik born in 1896. Leibe who had a second family after the war and they now live in Israel.
Zvi Hirsh who perished in Kurenets with his family, Ilana who married Gdalia Rotstein and perished with her family in Kurenets.(Gdalia Rotsteins’ brother Mulia Rotstein- lives in Kfar Charif, Israel.)
Chava who married Redek after the war and her three children live in Israel. Her son Shalom was the last Jew to be born in Kurenets in 1955. Feyga who married Chaim Podberesky from Grodok/Horodok. (His brother Efraim Podberesky born in 1914, was the first husband of our mother he perished in the war)the Podberesky family was originally from Vishnevo.
our father Orzik was first married to Mirel who was born in Vilna. Their children were Yankle (Yasha) Alperovitch who became well known as a partisan. he was born in Kurenets in 1921. His son lives in Belarus and recently received a Visa to come to the U.S. with his 26 years old son to join his daughter and her husband. Chaim Isar who was born in 1923 and died of heart problems in 1942 during the war. Shmuel who was born in 1925 and lives in Russia today. Chava born 1932 and Yerucham born 1938 perished with their mother Meril in Kurenets 9-9-1942. Orzik second wife (Our mother)was from Rakov she was from the Botwinik family. Some of her fathers’ relatives came to America before the war. She had a cousin Berry Botwick (Changed from Botwinick) who lives in West Hartford Con. She had a family from her mother side; Eidelzik Shlomo and Gershon. The rest of the family perished.

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Avraham and Shlomo Alperovitch
Afula, Israel -

PODBERESKY - Solomon, 72 of Pembroke Pines, FL died March 12, 1994. Levitt Weinstien Beth David Memorial Chapel.*
WORCESTER - Carl C. Swirsky, 79, of 701 Three Island Blvd., Hallendale, Fla., and 44 Elm St., died yesterday in his home after an illness.
He leaves his wife of six years, Mildred (Goldstein) Swirsky; a son, Bruce W. Swirsky of Paxton; a daughter, Esta Podberesky of Los Altos, Calif.; a brother, Samuel Swirsky of Fort Lee, N.J.; a sister, Edna Swirsky of Waterbury, Conn.; and six grandchildren. His first wife, of 44 years, Sylvia (Lubin) Swirsky, died in 1982. He was born in New York City, son of William and Gussie (Geller) Swirsky, and lived here more than 62 years. He moved to Florida two years ago but maintained a summer home here
SARAH AVNAIM
Age 87, of West Palm Beach, passed away Friday, April 30, 1999.
She had lived here since 1971 coming from New York. She was a life time member of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and also a member of the "Bike-Trike" club in Century Village.
She is survived by her daughter Eleanor Podberesky of West Palm Beach; 8 grandchildren; 7 great-grandchildren and one sister
Jake Podberesky born 24 Aug 1882 W naturalized citizen Lauderdale# 1 MS Database: WWI Civilian Draft Registrations
PODBERESKI GEORGE MALE 12/25/1896 02/15/1969 USSR MONTEREY 325262418 BRODOWSK
PODBERESKI JERZY MALE 12/25/1896 02/15/1969 USSR MONTEREY 325262418 BRODOWSK
A PODBERESKI (519) 725-6620 200 UNIVERSITY AVE W WATERLOO ON N2L 3G1
GEORGE & ELIZABETH PODBERESKI (905) 824-2190 6875 GRACEFIELD DR MISSISSAUGA ON L5N 6T6
JOSEPH PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 390-03-8551 Residence: 53140 Kenosha, Kenosha, WI
Born 22 Apr 1894 Last Benefit:
Died Jan 1968 Issued: WI (Before 1951
BENJAMIN PODBERESKY Request Information
SSN 162-10-7967 Residence: 19151 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Born 25 Aug 1894 Last Benefit:
Died Jan 1970 Issued: PA (Before 1951)

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ESTHER PODBERESKY Request Information
SSN 126-30-6853 Residence: 11369 East Elmhurst, Queens, NY
Born 19 Jul 1890 Last Benefit:
Died Feb 1976 Issued: NY (1955 And 1957)
ISADORE PODBERESKY Request Information
SSN 195-28-6353 Residence: 18510 Scranton, Lackawanna, PA
Born 25 Mar 1892 Last Benefit: 18018 Bethlehem, Northampton, PA
Died Sep 1978 Issued: PA (1952 And 1954)
NATHAN PODBERESKY Request Information
SSN 101-03-7016 Residence: 11694 Rockaway Park, Queens, NY
Born 20 Feb 1889 Last Benefit:
Died Sep 1967 Issued: NY (Before 1951)
GERTRUDE PODBERESKY Request Information
SSN 063-52-7932 Residence: 11230 Brooklyn, Kings, NY
Born 5 Jun 1895 Last Benefit:
Died Nov 1973 Issued: NY (1973)
ESTHER PODBERSKY Request Information
SSN 020-38-2205 Residence: 02150 Chelsea, Suffolk, MA
Born 3 Aug 1904 Last Benefit:
Died Jun 1984 Issued: MA (1964)

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ISADORE PODBERSKY Request Information
SSN 010-09-0752 Residence: 02151 Revere, Suffolk, MA
Born 3 Aug 1896 Last Benefit:
Died Dec 1968 Issued: MA (Before 1951)




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USA -

EDWARD PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 399-09-2481 Residence: 53142 Kenosha, Kenosha, WI
Born 6 Apr 1919 Last Benefit:
Died 3 Oct 2000 Issued: WI (Before 1951)

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JERZY PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 325-26-2418 Residence: 93940 Monterey, Monterey, CA
Born 25 Dec 1896 Last Benefit:
Died Feb 1969 Issued: IL (Before 1951)

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JOSEPH PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 390-03-8551 Residence: 53140 Kenosha, Kenosha, WI
Born 22 Apr 1894 Last Benefit:
Died Jan 1968 Issued: WI (Before 1951)

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MARIANNE PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 188-32-2650 Residence: 14075 Hamburg, Erie, NY
Born 13 Mar 1929 Last Benefit:
Died 15 Jun 1989 Issued: PA (1957 And 1959)

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MICHAEL PODBERESKI Request Information
SSN 388-14-0944 Residence: 53143 Kenosha, Kenosha, WI
Born 13 Jun 1922 Last Benefit:
Died 25 Jan 2001 Issued: WI (Before 1951)

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Search Results

Database: WWI Civilian Draft Registrations
Combined Matches: 1



Name Birth Date Ethnicity Birth Place City/County State
Jake Podberesky 24 Aug 1882 W naturalized citizen Lauderdale# 1 MS




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Search Results

Database: U.S. Naval Deaths, World War I
Combined Matches: 1



Surname Given Name MI Place of Death Death Date Cause of Death Next of Kin Relationship Address Appointed Rank Branch
Rogovin Louis home,618 Cross St.,Malden,Mass. Sept.27,1918 pneumonia Fannie Rogovin wife 618 Cross St.,Malden,Mass. Boston,Mass. landsman for quartermaster U.S.Naval Reserve Force





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USA -

Shalom-- my name is Lee Podair (family name changed in US from Podbresky in 1940s). I am an attorney and 42-year old father of three in New York. I am looking for information on the Podberesky (spelling?) and Zigman families of Vishnevo. I have been in contact with Leonard Robbins in the USA, who has some interesting information and the last time I was in Israel (Feb 2000) I talked to Shimon Podbresky of Kibbutz Eilon near Nahariya, but I think that I may be related to a "different line" of the Podberesky family. Are you aware of any other leads that could help me? By the way, I did try to log into the "Chat Room" on the Vishnevo website, but was unsuccessful. Any information that you could give me would be appreciated. If you need further information about my relatives, please let me know. Thank you, Lee Podair
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USA -

Irgun Yotsey Volozhyn- c/o M. Porat,
10 Byron St. Tel Aviv 63411, Israel Tel. 972-3-5230085, E-M:

Dear Volozhyn landsman's family,
In September 2000 the Volozhyn Kehila Memorial creation was accomplished. Two gravestones memorials with wrought iron plates in Hebrew, Russian & English are set up on top of the Volozhyn ancient graveyard. It is overlooking the broken old gravestones, the six common graves for our brothers. and the mass slaughter site where 2000 Jews were executed in May 10th 1942. The English text: "Memory to thousands Volozhyn Jews, murdered by the fascists inside the town, in the years 1941/3. Their remnants are buried here in six common graves. Peace to their soul".
Every one who visits Volozhyn and passes the graveyard will see the memorial. He will read the text in the language familiar to him and have a concept of the crime that was committed here 60 years ago.
Volozhyn with its Graveyard actual plan and the Memorial photo - are attached.
Since last February we cooperate with Ms. Eilat Gordin-Levitan: - http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/volozhin.html
Ms. Eilat has developed a multi-shtetl site of Jewish congregations in the Western Belarus area. We cooperated with this site; corresponding, supplying and receiving facts and news about Volozhyn Lands-men/women and their descendants. With Ms. Eilat's efficient support we arrived to open a Volozhyn Izkor Book section in the most important Jewish Genealogy site.

Our aim is to publish in both sites the Volozhyn city and its yeshiva book. The Volozhyn Landsleit Associations of Israel and the United States had published this book in Tel Aviv, 1970. It contains 160 articles on 700 pages. Publishing it on the Internet will contribute to the memorial and conservation of our exterminated congregation.
To accomplish this work we shall translate each article from Hebrew to English, to type the translation on a computer device and to revise/correct the English. The translation is a big and expensive work. To perform it we need your help. Everyone may choose the article name, that interests him, from the book contents list in one of the above sites and should ask me for its Hebrew copy to translate, or an English not revised version to revise,or a copy in English to retype.(Some pages in the book are in English and mostly are about Volozhiners in America)We could fax or mail you the pages.
Please ask your children, or do it yourself: 1) Translate an article; 2) Revise a translation 3) Type on a computer device an article printed originally in English. If you are ready to do this work voluntarily, please proceed as explained.
Some dates to remember or to participate:
April 13th, 8:00-16:00, An Annual meeting of the Belarus Olim (Immigrant) Association in Israel, at Yaar Ben Shemen. 2500 participants and many celebrities attended. It looks like a giant multi families picnic. Russian language knowledge is recommended.
April 19th, The Holocaust Memorial Day in Israel
May 2nd, Organized Visit to Belarus, includes Volozhyn, now in preparation. For details please ask Ms Frida Lavit, phone ++ 972-4-8231092 (Russian, Hebrew, Yiddish).
May 15th, 22nd Iyar, Memory Day of the Volozhyn Martyrs. At the Volozhyn Mazeyva in Tel Aviv- Kiryat Shaul Graveyard,

For details, Please ask at our address.

Have a good, healthy, peaceful and Kosher Passover,





Moshe Porat poratm@netvision.net.il
Israel -

VISHNIVE
MEMORIAL PRAYER FOR THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
SARA-DVORA ELISHKEVITCH
The mother of the Elishkevitch family. She died from weakness and sorrow in the Jewish ghetto in September 1942, in Vishnive.

Two of her sisters left Vishnive in the early 20th century for New York: Sheine-Riva Elishkevitch Blumberg and Feigle Elishkevitch Sugerman. Both lived with their families in the United States
http://www.geocities.com/vishnive/

click here for pictures of the Elishkevitch sisters.
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A note I received from Doris....Dear Eilat, Thanks for your help. Dad did tell me about the Bacall-Persky connection, as well as a possible one with Shimon Peres. Some additional info. for you about my grandfather. Name was actually Avraham Isaac Persky, he had a brother Beryl? who was captured by Germans in WWI and was never heard from again. They thought, perhaps he relocated there after war or died as a result of captivity. Avraham Isaac was about 46 when he first made the trip to America with the three sons. Hope this sheds more light. I am so excited about finding all of this fascinating geneology. Doris
...Subj:could you tell me if this person is a relative?
Date: 3/26/01 6:57:08 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: EilatGordn@aol.com
To: Vilna13@aol.com

Headline: OBITUARIES
Publication Date: January 25, 1992
Source: The Harrisburg Patriot
Page: B2
Subjects: OBITUARY
Region: Pennsylvania
Obituary: Zelda Cloder, 82, of Lower Paxton Twp., and formerly of Reading, died yesterday in the Jewish Home of Greater Harrisburg, Lower Paxton Twp.
She was active in community groups.
She was the widow of Maurice Cloder. Surviving are a son, Bernard of Harrisburg; a daughter, Miriam Schwartz of Houston; a brother, Irving Persky of Reading; and five grandchildren.
Memorial services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Geigle Funeral Home, Susquehanna Twp.
Memorial contributions may be made to Operation Exodus II, c/o United Jewish Community, 100 Vaughn St., Harrisburg 17110.
-- Margaret F. Piszela
Eilat, Zelda was my aunt, my father Irvin (Isaac) Persky's, sister. My father died in April the same year as Aunt Zelda. He was 78 and the youngest in his immediate family consisting of Joseph (Judel), Julius( Sorel), Phillip (Pesach), Samuel and Zelda (Sadie?). I think their mother was a Rudnick whose name was changed to Levin by her half brothers when they got to America, due to some shady family business to which I was never privy - shucks!! Dad was a most amazing man. A silver star medal recipient in World War II for valor in the Pacific Theatre as a rear gunner in a B-24. He accomplished so much in his life and was loved by all - an amazing man. I only wish that he could see the photos and info. you have provided. He told me about there being learned Rabbis in the family. I wonder if Rabbi Yehuda was his grandfather? Are you related to me? Doris

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USA -

http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_800.html
VISHNIVE "TARBUT" SCHOOL - 1923 Annual picture, Including the names of students and teachers identified by Chaia Elishkevich Rogovin

To find out more detailed information about the people in the photograph, point and click on the particular individual
click here for the 1923 Annual school picture
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"Tarbut" School in Vishnive
Establishing the School
VISHNIVE "TARBUT" SCHOOL - 1923 Annual picture, Including the names of students and teachers

The "Tarbut" school was built in 1921 near the market square synagogue. The whole community financed it. My brother Yaacov-Hirsh Elishkevich and Chaim Abramson were the initiators and founders of this school. This was a Zionist school. The teachers were Zionists. Top priority in the students' education were the love of Eretz Israel, Aliyah and settling the country. The students were taught Hebrew (Ashkenazi dialect), Hebrew literature, Bible, Talmud, Polish language, arithmetic, geography and nature. The school board did not allow technical subjects as they were considered to be secular studies.

There was no kindergarten class until almost WWII. Instead there was Pre-School A for five and six year olds, and Pre-School B for seven year olds. Children in the Pre-School began to study reading, writing and arithmetic immediately.

In First Grade, studies of reading, writing and arithmetic would continue. In Second Grade studies of Hebrew, geography and nature would begin. There were no classroom teachers. Instead each subject had its own teacher. Yaacov-Hirsh was teaching all the subjects except Talmud. Alter Podbereski was teaching Talmud. Initially the school consisted of six grades. In later years there were eight grades.


The School Board
The school board consisted of well respected people from the shtetl, who knew Talmud. The board generated the curriculum. No teachers were included in the board.

The Board members were:
Yudl - Yehuda Gurevich (An uncle of my husband, Mordechai Rogovin) - Ultra Orthodox. Talmudist.
Alter Shrira - Talmudist.
Isar Brekman - An accountant in "Vishnive Yidishe Pols Bank".
Baruch Rabinovich - Isar's assistant in the Bank who had children in the school.
Yosef Mendel Rabinovich - Very intelligent. Knowledgeable in Talmud. Father of Yehoshua Rabinovich (Former mayor of Tel-Aviv. Former finance minister in Yitzhak Rabin's first government).
Rabbi Zvi Efron - Chief Rabbi of Vishnive.
Yeshayahu Leib Podbereski - Talmudist.
Hirshl Meltzer - Knowledgeable in Talmud. Grandfather of Shimon Peres (Former Israeli Prime Minister).

Since it was a private school, the parents paid the teachers' salaries, monthly, through the Board.


YACOPO-UNRA - Yiddish Cooperative from America
Financial aid for tuition was given by YACOPO to children whose parents could not afford the payment. In addition, every week volunteers would collect money all over town for the tuition of needy students. The school also accepted Jewish children from nearby shtetls which did not have a "Tarbut" school. For example, Rephael Elishkevich, my cousin from Ivenitz, studied in my school and lived with us.

During the war most of the students did not study at all. Therefore, when the school was opened, each grade would consist of children of various ages. A 14 year old would study with a 10 year old . A 16 year old girl would study in the morning with a 9 year old boy, while at night she would go out on a date. The immediate goal was to help the students acquire basic skills (reading, writing and arithmetic) and only later move on to the other subjects. This was a co-ed school.

The school grew larger over the years. Yehoshua Rabinovich, who was a student of my brother, studied in Vilna. Then he returned to Vishnive and joined Yaacov-Hirsh and Alter Podbereski as a teacher. In 1938, before my Aliyah to Eretz Israel, there were 200 students in eight grades, and a purely Hebrew-speaking kindergarten opened. Additional young teachers, graduates of the Vilna "Tarbut" Teacher's Seminarion (academy) joined the staff. Teachers began establishing their trade unions at that time. My brother became a member of the Vilna teachers' trade union. Teachers' earnings improved significantly. The Polish government allowed freedom of Jewish education.

the next chapter;
The Wedding of My Sister Rachel-Lea

from-
"THE SHTETL AND I"



to read more click here;
-

from;
The Russian and Prussian Armies
of the Napoleonic Wars
http://russian-prussian.napoleonicwars.com/Russian_Leaders/Peter_Bagration__The_Best_Geor/Chapter_7/chapter_7.shtml
 

...
.....Bagration issued following orders:
To the 27th Infantry Division: concentrate in Novogrudok and to expect arrival there of the main forces of the 2nd Western Army;
To the Chief-of-Engineers: send sappers to the Niemen with a task to find a place across the river at Kryvichy, Nikolaev and Delyatichy and to construct by June 21, a ferry in the elected place; find a way for the army to move to Vishnev and Volojin.....






click here to read more
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Good morning all. Does anyone have any information on the RABINOVICH and
DELATITSKY families of Delyatichi? I have recently found, on passenger lists,
that these families that settled in the Houston, Texas area were from
Delyatichi. I have details on the families in the US and on the DELATITSKY
side some information from Europe in Vishnevo. Thanks for any help. Leonard

Leonard Robbins
Cleveland, TX, USA
.
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Shimon Peres; You know, a famous Jewish philosopher by the name of Yankelwitz said once that Jewish life in the Diaspora was similar to a voyage in a subway- you travel under- ground, you don't see the scenery, and nobody sees you in the train.... ...A shtetl in many ways was a subway of Jewish life; it was totally disconnected from the outside world........
...It was a pleasure because it was disconnected from the rest of life.It was not a normal place to live....we were not living there mentally . our hearts were in Israel. the shtetl was a passing station. Vishneva was not a large place- tweelve hundred people, something like that.I think it maybe had one to one and a half streets. it had wooden buildings, it did not have electricity, it had two synagogues, it had a Zionist school which was called "Tarbut", Tarbut is culture in Hebrew.
We were taught Hebrew and yiddish in school. there was a generation gap- the generation of the more religious, My mothers' father generation. Reb Meltzer, had great impact on my life. He was a product of the greatest yeshiva in Jewish life, Volozhin, right next to vishnevo. He studied together with our national poet, Chaim Nahman Bialik...
my grandfather was very religious, very strict.
He was a leader in the community. he had a beautiful voice- on Yom Kippur evening he would conduct the prayers. He made a living by making boots from wool..... ..
My father, (Getzel Persky) on the other hand, was the second generation, a modern Jew.He didn't respect shabat, he was not religious. I was so much influenced by my grandfather that when my father bought the first radio in town, which worked on batteries- we did not have electricity- and he tried to play it on Shabat, I broke it, I destroyed it....
...I was never punished by my parents. I was always forgiven. they Thought that they had a nice boy, and they respected all my wishes, all my inclinations. I was never punished in my life....
... In the shtetl we had all the parties which exist in Israel today. In the small shtetl we had likud, which was at that time called "Bitar" a right wing Zionist youth movement. We had Hashomer Hatzair, a Zionist socialist youth movement, the Meretz of today. we had the beginning of Labor and all the parties...
...My uncle was the head of Bitar, my aunt was the head of Hashomer Hatzair . So we were living it very Vividly.the greatest day was when books or oranges arrived from Israel. we used to smell even the paper that covered the oranges. when a Vishnevan made Aliyah to Eretz Israel, we all went to the railroad station to witness the great departure. it was always a great occasion......
from For the future of Israel

....Strangely this very small area produced some important people. The head of the Jewish Agencey, Nachum Goldman was born and raised there [left at the age of six]
A famous author, Buki Ben Yogi, was born there. A famous Rabbi, Rabbi Meir Berlin [Bar- Ilan]. the minster of finances Yehoshua Rabinovitz...You can see how deeply engaged shtetl Jews used to be.
to order the book click here;
-

Bacall,Lauren -- b.9/16/1924
Movie/Stage Actress, Jewish
b. in New York City; RN:Betty Joan Perske; How to Marry a Millionaire, Key Largo, Big Sleep, Cactus Flower; Humphrey Bogart's, then Jason Robards Jr.'s ex-; Shimon Peres' 1st cousin

.
USA -

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~pnlowe/jerusalem/g0000013.html#I1521

Harry RABINOWITZ
[948] 1894 - 1961
BIRTH: 1894, Vishnevo, Vilna, Russia
DEATH: 1961, New York Family 1 : Ida JERUSALEM
Edward RABSON
Roslyn RABINOWITZ
from Peter Lowe Page
Family History Research




click for familt tree page
USA -

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~pnlowe/jerusalem/g0000013.html#I1521

Harry RABINOWITZ

[948] 1894 - 1961


BIRTH: 1894, Vishnevo, Vilna, Russia
DEATH: 1961, New York Family 1 : Ida JERUSALEM
 Edward RABSON
 Roslyn RABINOWITZ
Peter Lowe Index Page
Family History Research

click here for the family three
USA -

Former Israeli prime minister's son speaks in Rancho Bernardo
Ven Griva
For the North County Times
ESCONDIDO ---- Dr. Yonatan Peres made no effort to hide his intense interest in the political developments in Israel on Saturday while attending an intimate luncheon at the spacious home of Judy and Gerry I. Bustain.
Peres stood in the family room of the Burstains' home and watched a CNN Headline News report showing current Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak announcing his resignation, calling for snap elections and declaring the vote a referendum on the Middle East peace process.

Dr. Peres has more than a passing interest in Israeli politics. His father is Shimon Peres, twice Prime Minister of Israel and, along with Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat, winner of the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize.

Peres, 48, a doctor of veterinary medicine and the head of the Israel Guide Dog Center for the Blind, had just finished speaking to the congregation at Ner Tamid Synagogue in Rancho Bernardo about the program he heads and its need for support. His first clue as to the goings-on in Israel came as he listened to the car radio on the drive from Rancho Bernardo to Escondido.

Afterward, sitting at a table in the Burstains' back yard with its view of the Laguna Mountains and the San Pasqual Valley, Peres said Barak's move was understandable. He said Barak's resignation did not indicate a crisis, but just another twist in Israel's politics.

"He's beating off challenges," Peres said. "By doing this, he doesn't give his opponents much time to prepare their campaigns."

Peres said Barak took the political initiative from a parliament that was prepared to dissolve and head to new general elections in late spring. Barak's resignation forces special elections within 60 days for prime minister alone. Under special election laws, the field of candidates is limited to members of Parliament and excludes his main nationalist rival, former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Netanyahu quit his seat in Parliament and the leadership of the Likud party the day Barak overwhelmingly defeated him for prime minister in May 1999.

Barak leads the Israeli Labor Party, the party of Shimon Peres. Nearly 10 weeks of strife between Palestinians and Israelis over autonomy in the Palestinian homeland have eroded Barak's popularity and cast a cloud over the peace process engineered in part by Dr. Peres' father, Shimon.

However, the younger Peres said he would counsel his 77-year-old father to deny the urgings of others to run for a third term as prime minister.

"I know many people are pushing him to do it," Peres said. "But I think it would be a mistake. It is time for my father to be an elder statesman."

Despite recent events, Yonatan Peres remains optimistic about the prospect for a lasting peace in Israel and the Middle East.

"Look what happened in the Intifada in '86," Peres said. "They sat down and worked it out. We've advanced in talks with the Palestinians.

"We've been through even tougher times," he added. "There is peace with Egypt. There is peace with Jordan. We are out of Lebanon."

Perez was in North County as part of a two-week, cross-country speaking tour seeking support for his guide dog center, a nonprofit organization devoted to helping blind people in Israel achieve independence and mobility. As the center's director of development, he spoke Friday at Congregation Beth Am in Carmel Valley.

This is not Peres' first North County visit. He is fond of the San Diego Wild Animal Park because of its link to his family.

Yonatan Peres' famous father was born Shimon Persky in 1923 in the town of Vishnevo in a region that what was then in Poland but is now part of Belarus. Afterward he immigrated to Israel and as a young man he was sent on a mission by Israel's first Prime Minister David Ben-Gurien to map the Negev Desert.

One day in the desert Persky encountered a rare and endangered bearded vulture called in Hebrew a peres. Seeing it as a lucky coincidence, a zoologist on the mission with Shimon Persky suggested that he change his name in accordance with custom to one that sounded more Hebrew and afterward Shimon Persky became Shimon Peres.

In time that bird and its mate were sent from a zoo in Israel to the Wild Animal Park, where other rare vultures such as the California condor have successfully reproduced. Before leaving, the bird had been named by Israeli zoo workers Shimon Peres and its mate was named Sonia Peres after the former prime minister's wife.

Peres added with a chuckle that it was said if this nesting couple hatched a boy it would be named Yonatan after himself.

Anyone interested in contacting the Israel Guide Dog Center for the Blind can call (215) 343-0373.

12/12/00
Name Death County
of Death County
of Residence Age at Death Volume Certificate
UNICOI BURBN BRIAN D PERSKY 1997 07 27 017
JEFFN GITEL PERSKY 29 01 22 070
BURBN 786UNKNOWN BRIAN D PERSKY 1997 07 27 017
Subject: From Vishneva?

Posted by: Doris Persky Leisawitz
Message: Hi Dimitri, Did you say that your familty is also from near Vilna? Do you know grandparents' names. Do you have any other information? Doris
Subject: Persky from Vishneva

Posted by: Lenn Zonder
Message: Doris, please contact me at lenwrite@surfree.com.
My maternal great-grandmother was a Persky from Vishneva
Lenn
Subject: INFO

Posted by: JAMI PERSKY
Message: I AM LOOKING FOR ANYONE WHO MIGHT KNOW THE
WHERE ABOUTS OF LAWRENCE LEE PERSKY. MY FATHER
WITH WHOM I HAVE NOT SEEN IN EIGHT YEARS.
YOU CAN CONTACT ME BY MAIL P.O. 257
ORONOGO MO 64855. THIS INFO WOULD BE DEEPLY
APPRECIATED.
Persky family name

Posted by: Olga Persky
Message: Hello to everyone on this board. Few years ago i was doing research on family name and was corresponding with a lot of Persky in US and Belarus.
It was a story in my family and i find confirmation on it from other Perskys everywhere in world that originally all Persky came from village Pershy in Belarus (this place was owned by Russia, Litva, Poland in different times and it was causing a lot of confusion). It's really small village - i was there 2 years ago and nothing from Jewish history is remaining there. BUT!!! In town Volozhin few km from there is Jewish cemetery. 90% of graves have Persky name there.
I will be very glad to contact Persky on this list and share info i have. I recently living in Toronto, Canada.
Posted by: Elaine Persky
Message: Hello Olga:I was more than happy to read your message.I thank you for sharing this with us. I did not know that their is a village of Pershy in Belarus and that the Persky's started there. In my search i also find that my great grand father came from Russia somewhere around Wishniva Vilus. I see on the 1920 census from Hartford Ct that my great grand father Issac came to the US in 1900 and his wife Bella and some of their eight children came to the US in 1904.I have not been able to find the ship or port that was used when Issac or Bella left Russia or port of entry they came through in the US.(maybe NY). I would love to know if Issac had any brothers or sisters,Mom or Dad that he may have left in Russia.any help would be more than appreciate. If you need more information on what i know of the Persky's on my side please let me know. Please answer soon.
Elaine Persky
email finecandy@aol.com
Subject: Persky from Volozhin

Posted by: Lenn Zonder
Message: To Olga and Elaine,
Wishneva or Vishneva is the same shtetl. The difference in spelling is one is Polish and the other Russian.
Elaine, perhaps your grandfather came through either New Haven or Bridgeport. Both were ports of entry until the 1950's and. of course, much nearer to Hartford.
Also both of you should get the autobigraphy of Shimon Peres. Peres was born in Wishneva in 1923. His grandfather was head of the Yeshiva in Volozhin for many years.
Peres says his name was originally Simon Persky (not my great uncle, but I believe a later relative).
Lenn
Subject: Re: Family information

Posted by: Jeffrey James Persky
Message: I was born in Chicago Il. I now live in Sunland CA. Im married to Patricia we have three children together two of which are boys to carry on the Persky name sake. My parents were Edward Clarence Persky and Ruth Hellen Kalish-Persky My parents had 7-children total.
Im told my father's mother or it might be grandmother's name was Gertrude Hannapel. If any one has any information I can be reached at persky5@mediaone.net
Replies:   Persky
Subject: Persky family

Posted by: Lenn Zonder
Message: Hi Jeff,
There might be a chance we are related. A couple of the names you mentioned ring a bell with me.
My question is: Do you know if any of your family -- grandfather or great-grandfather Persky came from New Haven, CT?
I have both Persky's and Kalish's in my family tree.
Please contact me direct at lenwrite@surfree.com
Lenn
Subject: SARAH PERSKY

Posted by: ELAINE PERSKY
Message: I AM TOLD THAT MY GREATAUNT SARAH ALSO CAME TO THE U.S. AROUND 1900-1904. I CAN NOT FIND THE NAME OF SHIP THAT ANY OF MY FAMILY CAME ON. SARAH WAS ONE OF 7 CHILDREN BORN IN RUSSIA, THE 8TH CHILD WAS BORN IN THE U.S. HER MOTHERS NAME WAS BELLA KAPLAN, ISSAC PERSKY WAS HER FATHER.I AM TOLD THAT SARAH AND HER FAMILY LIVED IN BROOKLYN N.Y.
WAS YOUR GREAT GRANDMOTHER A PERSKY? IF SO WHAT WAS HER MARRIAGE NAME? I WILL LOOK AT THIS BOARD EVERY DAY IN HOPE OF A QUICK ANSWER
ELAINE PERSKY
by: Lenn Zonder
Message: Hi Elaine,
My great-grandmother was from Volozhin, Minsk Gubernia, in modern Belorus.
To the best of my knowledge, which I acknowledge as incomplete, she had a brother Simon and a sister Anna Yale who settled in New Haven, CT. Also Bubbe and her husband lived in New Haven for a brief time, and eventually moved to New York and New Jersey.
She was married to Barnett Axelrod and they had several children.
Many of them remained in New Haven, one, Meyer, settled in Brooklyn and two others in Bayonne, NJ, where my grandmother died in 1953. Another of her children settled in Beacon, N.Y., and eventually moved with another daughter to Tuscon, AZ, where both died well-past their 100th birthdays.
Does any of this information jive with your family history. Are you a grandchild of Simon Persky?
Lenn
Replies:   Sarah Persky - Elaine Persky 7/25/00
           Sarah Persky - Lenn Zonder 7/25/00
                      Sarah Persky - Elaine Persky 7/25/00
right now i am working on a Persky Reunion.Last year we had 85 that i know i am related to and the year before we had 125 people. I would sure like to have some new perskys.This year it will be held on Sept.10,200.If you would like to keep in touch with me other than through this board you can email me at finecandy@aol.com.
The same for any other that may be related to the perskys that read this board.as always i will check this board offten.
Elaine
I AM TOLD THAT MY GREATAUNT SARAH ALSO CAME TO THE U.S. AROUND 1900-1904. I CAN NOT FIND THE NAME OF SHIP THAT ANY OF MY FAMILY CAME ON. SARAH WAS ONE OF 7 CHILDREN BORN IN RUSSIA, THE 8TH CHILD WAS BORN IN THE U.S. HER MOTHERS NAME WAS BELLA KAPLAN, ISSAC PERSKY WAS HER FATHER.I AM TOLD THAT SARAH AND HER FAMILY LIVED IN BROOKLYN N.Y.
WAS YOUR GREAT GRANDMOTHER A PERSKY? IF SO WHAT WAS HER MARRIAGE NAME? I WILL LOOK AT THIS BOARD EVERY DAY IN HOPE OF A QUICK ANSWER
ELAINE PERSKY
Lenn Zonder
Message: Hi Elaine,
My great-grandmother was from Volozhin, Minsk Gubernia, in modern Belorus.
To the best of my knowledge, which I acknowledge as incomplete, she had a brother Simon and a sister Anna Yale who settled in New Haven, CT. Also Bubbe and her husband lived in New Haven for a brief time, and eventually moved to New York and New Jersey.
She was married to Barnett Axelrod and they had several children.
Many of them remained in New Haven, one, Meyer, settled in Brooklyn and two others in Bayonne, NJ, where my grandmother died in 1953. Another of her children settled in Beacon, N.Y., and eventually moved with another daughter to Tuscon, AZ, where both died well-past their 100th birthdays.
Does any of this information jive with your family history. Are you a grandchild of Simon Persky?
Lenn
Subject: Vishneva and Volozhin

Posted by: Lenn Zonder
Message: For an eyewitness view of these two Belorussian towns read Shimon Peres' book: For the Future of Israel.
Peres, born Simon Persky in Vishneva in 1923, describes his boyhood in the Volozhin area in the opening chapters.
Lenn
Database: Aiken County, South Carolina Cemetery Inscriptions
Combined Matches: 2


Surname Given Name Birth Date Death Date Cemetery Comments
Persky Nathan 1888 1965 Bethany Cemetery son of Leah & Mordecai,born Russia
Persky Esther/ Surasky 1899 1985 Bethany Cemetery dau of Freidel & Chaim, born Poland




.
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Part of a note that I received from Uri Helberg in Israel;
....Dvora received an e-mail from Arlene of N.Y that her grandmother was also from the Elishkevich (Laskovich) family of Vishnive . We learned from her that there are many descendants of that family in The US. they are second and third cousins of Dvora . We managed to find out how they are linked.
Dvora`s brother, Zvi , translated more stories of Grandma, Chaya Elishkevich Rogovin, into English . Yuval will add it to the website in the coming days and you will be able to see it.

to read Chaya Elishkevich Rogovin story click here.
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Some preliminary notes on Israeli family names by Gershom Martin (comartin@wicc.weizmann.ac.il) Sources for Israeli family names are manifold:(A) Newly adopted family names in Israel Among the first returnees to the Land of Israel, a strong current ofsh'lilat ha-gola (negation of the diaspora/Exile) existed, which often included the exchange of Diaspora family names (which some regarded as"slave names") for purely Hebrew ones. Later, David Ben-Gurion z"l issued a directive under which all Israeli diplomatic personnel as well as civil servants and career officers above certain ranks were obliged to Hebraize (l'avret) their last names.Even later, as tensions between ethnic groups arose, the desire to disidentify with a "stigmatized" ethnic group or to merge into a "collective Israeli identity" created further impetus for Hebraizations.Hebraizations take one of the following forms:(a) direct translations of the Diaspora name examples: Goldberg- Har-Paz, Schlossberg- Har-Segor, Steinberg - Har-Even, Rosenstein- Even-Shushan, Herbst- Stavi, Silver[man]- Caspi, Quecksilber- Caspit [mercury] , Gold - Zahavi, Stahl[mann] - Peled[steel] Goldstein- Even-Zahav, Edelstein - Even-Chen [precious stone] Finkelstein, Diamant- Yahalom, Kristal, Gavish Bernstein - Inbar, Inbari [amber]
Shechter, Reznik/Resnick- Shochat [(ritual) butcher], Fried[man]- [Ish-]Shalom Ruehig, Stiller - Shalev [tranquil] , Weinstock- Gefen [vine], Weintraub- Einav, [grape] Weingarten-Kerem [vineyard], Wald[man] - Ya'ari Loewenberg- Har-Arieh, Har-Lavi, Lavi, Bergmann- Har-Ish, Harari [harar=mountain dweller], Fischer - Dayag, Dayagi, Schneider, Kravitz- Chayat [tailor] , Schuster -Sandlar (shoemaker), Burg- Ma'oz [fortress] Graff - Rozen [count], Shulsinger, Cantor - Chazan , Sanger/Singer, Nachtigall - Zamir [both "singer" and nightingale"] Wassermann- Maimon, Elfenbein- Shenhav [ivory], Morgen[stern] -Shachar [Hebrew for "dawn"], Morgenthau -Tal-Shachar, Gottesdiener- Ovadia [servant of G-d][Hungarian: Hegedus] - Ovadia, Gottesfreund- Yedidya [friend of G-d],
Fried[man]- [Ish-]Shalom, Freud-Simcha, Sasson [both meaning "joy"]
Lerner - Lamdan, Klug[er] - Chacham [wise], Navon [intelligent], Yavin [will understand] (newscaster Chaim Yavin, born Heinz Kluger), Lempel -Ner [light], Lapid- [torch](journalist-politician Yosef "Tommy" Lapid, born Tomislav Lempel) Cederbaum - Erez [cedar, ]Tannenbaum - Oren [pine-tree], Nussbaum- Luz [kind of nut-tree], Feigenbaum- Tamari [fig-tree], Eich[e],Eichler - Alon [oak-tree], Mandel[baum]- Shaked [almond (tree)] [German] rnbaum- \ Agassi [agas = pear][or Yiddish] Barenboim / Apfel[baum] - Tapuchi [tapu'ach=apple], Pomerantz- Tapuzi [Yiddish and Hebrew, resp. for "orange"], also: Hadar (meaning both citrus-tree and embellishment)

One special category are Jewish patronyms:Meyerson Ben-Meir [son of Meir] Mendelssohn- Ben-Menachem [son of Menachem (Yiddish diminutive: Mendel) ]Davidson- Ben-David Rubens- Ben-Reuven, Simon- Shimon, Ben-Shimon, Mozes- Moshe, Ben-Moshe, Wolfson - Ben-Ze'ev [son of Ze'ev=wolf], Hirsch(ensohn)- Ben-Tzvi , Lazarus- Ben-El`azar, Leiserowitch - Ben-Eliezer [Yiddish diminutive of Eliezer=Leiser]
Another one are minor "Hebraizations" of toponyms, e.g.
Wilner Vilna'i [both meaning "from Wilna"]
Deutsch(er) Ashkenazi [Ashkenaz=medieval Hebrew for Germany]

[contrary to popular belief, the common East European Jewish names "London"
and "Berlin" are NOT toponyms: "London" is a corruption of
"Lamdan" and "Berlin" the Slavic equivalent of "Baersohn" or "Ben-Dov"]

rather less minor is
Deutscher Ashkenazi [Ashkenaz=medieval Hebrew for Germany]



(a') negation of so-called "Ekelnamen" (deliberately insulting or demeaning
last names forced upon ancestors by malevolent officials)

e.g. Luegner [liar] = Amiti [truthful]
Ausubel [from garbage] = Ben-Tov [son of good]
Greif ["claw", indicating greed and/or miserliness]
Nadiv [benefactor]
(b) phonetic similarity (sometimes far-fetched) with a Biblical place
name, Jewish historical figure, or Hebrew word with a nice meaning
examples Meyerson Meir [brilliant; named for Rabbi Meir]
Gruen Ben-Gurion [historical figure]
Epstein Eilat [place name]
Kalb Gilboa [place name]
Berkovitz Barak [lightning]
Berlin Bar-Ilan [son of a (family) tree]
Uzan Oz [strength]
Gorodish Gonen [protector]
Rosen Rozen [Hebrew for a count]
Shertok Sharett [servant]
(Isser) Halperin Har-El [mountain of G-d (i.e. Zion)]
(Gen. Ariel) Schneiderman Sharon [place name]
(Shimon) Persky Peres [bearded vulture (don't ask!)]
(Mieczeslaw) Salomonowicz Prof. Michael Sela [rock]

Sometimes a name offers nice options for both (a) and (b)
Rosen Shoshani, Vardi (by meaning)
Rosen Rozen [Count] (by homophony)
Shkolnik Eshkol [cluster of grapes] (by homophony)
Shkolnik Lamdan [yeshiva student] (by meaning)
Feld Sadeh [field] (by meaning)
Feld Peled [steel] (by homophony)
Shneur, Shneior Shinar (by homophony)
Shneur, Shneior Bechor [1st-born son] (by meaning)
[Shneior is a Yiddishization of "Senior"]
Scheiner Shinar (by homophony)
Scheiner Me'ir (by meaning)
Diener Sharett (by meaning)
Diener Di-Nur [Aramaic: "from the fire"] (by homophony)
http://www.weizmann.ac.il/home/comartin/israelinames.txt


to read more of notes on Israeli family names click here
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The Persky family lived all around the Vilna area. many were related. I am posting some address for pictures and stories of and by Perskies from near by places;

Rabunski http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/rabunski.html Picture of Eltka nee Persky (sister to Shimon Peres' father Getzel and Lauren Becall father, William?) and her family. The Struggle to Survive http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_struggle.html Story by Zev Wolf the son of Eltka nee Persky. Dedicated to my parents, Rose and Wolf Rabunski http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_memoir_infancy.html a story by the grandson of Eltka nee Persky.
Welcome to the Volozhin Site Volozhin was near Vishnevo and the Persky families from both places were related. http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/volozhin.html
there are three Perskies in this picture of actors; Simcha Persky is on the top row far left, Sonia Persky is second from the right in the middle row. Mina persky is second on the bottom row.;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/1230_6_b.gif

Sonia Persky on the far right ; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/1230_12_b.gif http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/1230_12_b.gif
Yehuda Avraham Persky ;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/22301_6_b.gif
The Persky/ Shwarzberg family; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/12901_17_b.gif
The Persky/ tabachovitz family; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/20401_2_b.gif
Rikla nee Persky; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/21101_6_b.gif
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/21101_6_b.gif
Noach Persky, grandson of the leader of the community; Yosef Yozel Persky descendant of the wellknown Dayan, Shimshon who lived in the time of Chaim of Volozhin c 1770- 1830. also relatives of the writer, Daniel Persky;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/21101_8_b.gif http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/21101_8_b.gif
click here for the persky family from Volozhin
USA -

I just found this page and it gave me the chills!My father, Isaac Persky was born in Vishneva in 1913, son of Abraham and Rose Rudnick Persky. I saw many Persky"i on the martyr page. I imagine they were related. I would like to connect with other Perkys.
Doris Persky Leisawitz vilna13@aol.com
Reading, PA USA -

Name: Abraham Persky
Address: 25 Orchard St.
Volume #: 483
Page #: 123
Date: 03 May 1921

 

Name: Abraham Persky
Address: 1620 Madison Ave.
Volume #: 444
Page #: 54
Date: 29 Nov 1920

 

Name: Elias Persky
Address: 202 Henry St
Volume #: 327
Page #: 6
Date: 02 Nov 1918

 

Name: Ellis Persky
Address: 176 Monroe St
Volume #: 40
Page #: 239
Date: 15 Nov 1911

 

Name: Isidore Persky
Address: 210 Madison St
Volume #: 124
Page #: 157
Date: 10 Sep 1913

 

Name: Morris Persky
Address: 80 E 107 St
Volume #: 504
Page #: 46
Date: 18 Aug 1921

 

Name: Samuel Persky
Address: 21 E 115 St
Volume #: 181
Page #: 182
Date: 03 Feb 1914

 

Name: Selig Lowis (Lewis) Persky
Address: 38 Forsyth St.
Volume #: 311
Page #: 153
Date: 17 Sep 1918
.
USA -

Database: Ohio 1910 Census Miracode Index
Combined Matches: 5

Benjamin Persky
  Age: 28 State: OH
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0214
  Birth Place: AUS Visit: 0113
  County: Cuyahoga, Cleveland
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Relation Name Color Age Birth Place
Wife Bluma 26 RUSS
Daughter Anna 03 Ohio


Joseph Persky
  Age: 48 State: OH
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0233
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0243
  County: Cuyahoga, Cleveland
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Relation Name Color Age Birth Place
Wife Pearl 47 TUR
Son Abram 21 TUR
Son Louis 14 Canada
Son Jacob 06 Canada
Son Phillip NR Ohio


Louis Persky
  Age: 35 State: OH
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0233
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0140
  County: Cuyahoga, Cleveland
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Relation Name Color Age Birth Place
Wife Annie 35 Russia
Son Abraham 15 Russia
Daughter Marion 13 Russia
Son Benjamin 11 Russia
Son Jacob 03 Ohio


Samuel Persky
  Age: 45 State: OH
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0202
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0229
  County: Cuyahoga, Cleveland
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Relation Name Color Age Birth Place
Wife Miriam 43 Russia
Daughter Rebecca 21 Russia
Son Abraham 23 Russia
Daughter Rachel 19 Russia
Son Julius 17 Russia
Son Hyman 12 Ohio
Son Benjamin 10 Ohio
1 non-relative


Samuel Persky
  Age: 45 State: OH
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0193
  Birth Place: RUSS Visit: 0283
  County: Stark, Canal Fulton
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Relation Name Color Age Birth Place
Wife Ida 43 RUSS
Daughter Belle 18 Ohio
Daughter Esther 17 Ohio
Son Jacob 16 Ohio
Daughter Irene 10 Ohio
Brother-in-law Archie Ginsberg 22 Russia
Brother-in-law Walter Ginsberg 17 Russia
Benjamin Persky
  Age: 30 State: PA
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0144
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0103
  County: Lehigh, Allentown
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Wife Rosa 27, Russia
Daughter Sophie 01, Pennsylvania

Hary Persky
  Age: 31 State: PA
  Color: W Enumeration District: 0012
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0319
  County: Philadelphia, Philadelphia
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Wife Annie 29, Russia
Son Samuel 09, Pennsylvania
Son Nathan 04, Pennsylvania
Daughter Jennie NR, Pennsylvania

Leon Persky
  Age: 39 State: PA
  Color: W Enumeration District: 1005
  Birth Place: Russia Visit: 0196
  County: Philadelphia, Philadelphia
  Relation: Head of Household
  Other Residents: Wife Anna 39, Russia
Son Abe 14, Russia
Son Jacob 09, New York
Daughter Minnie 06, New York
Son Rube 03, New York
Search Results

Database: Kentucky 1910 Miracode Index
Combined Matches: 2
Louis Persky
  Enumeration District: 0088 Color: W
  Age: 53 Birth Place: Russia
  Visit: 0242
  County: Jefferson, Louisville
  Relation: Husband
  Relatives: Wife Gittel 52, Russia
Son Jacob 22, Russia
Son Ben 20, Russia
Daughter Pearl 12, Russia
Daughter Mary 09, Russia

Ralph Persky
  Enumeration District: 0100 Color: W
  Age: 23 Birth Place: Russia
  Visit: 0048
  County: Jefferson, Louisville
  Relation: Husband
  Relatives: Wife Rosa 23, Russia
Son Robert 01, Kentucky
Daughter Ethel NR, Kentucky












 
.
USA -

Wiszniew was a gmina town and a miasteczko (small city) with dependencies: Bohdanow, Bombaly, Doikniewicze, Kociowszczyzna, Sakowszczyzna, Slajkowszczyzna, Yhlu, and Zardle. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 957. The railway was 6 km. away, trainstop for limited transports in Bohdanow, line: Lida-Molodeczno. The post office and telephone were in Wiszniew k. Bohdanowa and telegraph in Bohdanow. Traby had 1 Catholic church and 1 Orthodox church and an Association Of Merchants. Markets were Wednesdays. Traby had mills, tanneries and sawmills
Dajnowa Wielka was a village of Zabrzez. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Nowogrodek. The 1928 population was 557. The railway was in 9 km away in Horodzki. The post office and telephone were in Zabrzez. The telegraph was in Wolozyn.
Bakszty was a village and gmina town with dependencies: comprising: Borysowo, Nierowy, and Pacewicze). Iwieniec was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Nowogrodek. The 1928 population was 497. The railway was in 24 km away in Juraciszki. The post office and telephone were in Bakszty. The telegraph was in Wolozyn. Bakszty had a wood industry
Wolozyn was a gmina town and a miasteczko (small city) with dependencies: Dworzyszcze, Gintowszczyzna, Hackowo, Jewlosze, luzany, and Pieliwica. It was seat of the district of Wolozyn. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 2,630.The railway was in 16 km. away in Horodzki, line: Lida-Molodeczno. The post office, telegraph, and telephone were in Wolozyn. Wolozyn had 1 Catholic church, an Association Of Merchants. Wolozyn had Starostie, District Police Command, Bureau of Imports and Taxes, Public Revenue Dept., Inspector of Teachers, Rural District Office, Committee of District Colonization, Commission of District Expropriation, Customs Bureau, Dept. of Transportation, church, 2 Orthodox churches, 3 synagogues, Yeshiva, District hospital, District Health Office, and electric power station. The town had an Association of Merchants, Association of Town Employees, Association of State Employees, Association of Military Colonies, and Association of Jewish Artisans. Markets were Thursdays. Fairs: 5 for cattle, horses, and soil products. Wolozyn had mills, tanneries, and brandy making.
Zabrzez was a gmina town and a miasteczko (small city) with dependencies: Ciupaki, Dolewicze, Horodzki, Jozefpol, Moszki, Pienkowszczyzna, Pieslakowsczcyzna, Rozyslaw, Skrzypiewo, Truskowicze, and Uzbloc. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 306.The railway was in 4 km. away in Horodzki, line: Lida-Molodeczno. The post office was in Zabrzez, the telegraph in Wolozyn, and the telephone in Horodzki. Zabrzez had one Catholic church, an Association of Military Colonies, and an Association of Town Employees. Zabrzez had flax production
Losk was a village of Zabrzez. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 704. The railroad was 5 km away in Horodzki. The post office was in Zabrzez. The telephone was in Horodzki. The telegraph was in Wolozyn. Losk had one Catholic church.
Dubina Jruzducka was a village of Zabrzez. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 519. The railway was in 8 km away in Poloczany. The post office and telephone were in Zabrzez. The telegraph was in Wolozyn. The village had one Orthodox church

.
-

Searching for Town WISZNIEW/ Vishnevo
(D-M code 746700)
Number of hits: 176
Run on Monday 19 February 2001 at 23:53:18

This search request has been made possible through the JewishGen-erosity of Lynn Saxton

Town(coords)District Name /Company (registered)Street Occupation Notes
Wiszniew Wolozyn,W comestibles Wiszniew
Wolozyn ABRAMOWICZ, G retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn AMELJANOWICZ, H tea dealer/tea shop/cafe Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn ARAMOWICZ, dr. Stan. physicians
Wiszniew Wolozyn AREWICZ, M comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn BAJKOWICZ, R
grocer of staple items excluding bakery and dairy
Wiszniew Wolozyn BAKIEROWSKI, J comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERENSZTEJN, Mors M linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERKMAN, D drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERKMAN, F variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERKOWSKI: SEE RUDENSKI, mill
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERMAN, H drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERMAN, M drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERNADT, A mill wod Fryszerki
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERNSZTEJN, Maks (x) linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn BERZMAN, B fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn BIELINSKI, A wholesale salt Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn BLOCH, J tailor
Wiszniew Wolozyn BOHDANOW, wholesale produces from the colonies Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn BUNIMOWICZ, R linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn BUTENIEW: SEE CHREPTOWICZ, landowner Wiszniew Wolozyn CHAJKLIN, J drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn CHOS, J butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn CHREPTOWICZ-BUTENIEW, hr. Konst. landowner 18540
Wiszniew Wolozyn CWIERNEWSKI, S (x) liquor
Wiszniew Wolozyn CWIERTNIEWSKA, Br. midwife
Wiszniew Wolozyn CYLINSKI, J comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn DARSZON, Ch dentist
Wiszniew Wolozyn DASZKIEWICZ, F comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn DAWIDSON, H comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn DAWIDSON, J fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn DORFKA, W clock/watchmaker
Wiszniew Wolozyn DUBIECKI, B blacksmith
Wiszniew Wolozyn DUDMAN, J hairdresser
Wiszniew Wolozyn DUDMAN, M shoes
Wiszniew Wolozyn DUDMAN, M office supplies
Wiszniew Wolozyn DZIECHCLAR F, MARANY SZ AND B, F
forestry operation
Wiszniew Wolozyn DZIEDZIUL, W comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn ELIJASZEWICZ, D carpenter
Wiszniew Wolozyn ELJASZKIEWICZ, I tailor
Wiszniew Wolozyn GIRZON, Ch hairdresser
Wiszniew Wolozyn GIRZON, M variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn GITLIC, E baker
Wiszniew Wolozyn GURWICZ, Ch cheese
Wiszniew Wolozyn GURWICZ, E variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn GURWICZ, R (x) retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn GURWICZ, Sz fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn GURWICZ, W comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn HEJMAN, M baker
Wiszniew Wolozyn HORDYNIEC, J joiner/carpenter
Wiszniew Wolozyn HORDYNIEC, Sz barber-surgeon/feldsher Uhly
Wiszniew Wolozyn IWANCZ, A pork butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn JAKOWIEW, A wheelwright Bulkalowo
Wiszniew Wolozyn JAKOWIEW, P wheelwright Bulkalowo
Wiszniew Wolozyn JANKOWSKI, A wins and brandy
Wiszniew Wolozyn JANKOWSKI, J blacksmith
Wiszniew Wolozyn JAWIDOWICZ, S comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn JEDWABNIK, F linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn JEWELOWSKI, sawmill
Wiszniew Wolozyn JOSEL, M baker
Wiszniew Wolozyn JURGILEWICZ, J barrel maker
Wiszniew Wolozyn JURGILEWICZ, J butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAGAN, A fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn KALMANOWICZ, Ch hairdresser
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAMIONKA, leather and skins
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPELOWICZ, M butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, E fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, L drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, M fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, R drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, S tannery
Wiszniew Wolozyn KAPLAN, Sz sewing machines
Wiszniew Wolozyn KASA SPOLDZIELCZA, (x) savings and loan bank
Wiszniew Wolozyn KOLENDO, J tannery Bombaly
Wiszniew Wolozyn KOLENDO, T mason

Wiszniew Wolozyn KOPELOWICZ, M (x) fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn KOPELOWICZ, W (x) oil products
Wiszniew Wolozyn KOTLER, F shoes
Wiszniew Wolozyn KREMER, E fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn KRYCZYNSKA, Lubomila landowner Lostaja 110
Wiszniew Wolozyn KRYCZYNSKI, anat. landowner Pawilwowo 110
Wiszniew Wolozyn KWIATKOWSKI, J comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEBKOWSKI, M (x) liquor
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEJZEROWSKI, sz wholesale beer Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWICKI, A locksmith
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, H butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, L variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, L (x) inn
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, M wheelwright Klimy
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, S grain/seed
Wiszniew Wolozyn LEWIN, Sz variety store/sundries Wiszniew Wolozyn LIBERMAN, E baker
Wiszniew Wolozyn LICHTERMAN, I photography
Wiszniew Wolozyn LIWSZYC, M comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn LUBIANSKI, J iron
Wiszniew Wolozyn MAGIT, B (x) fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn MARANY:SEE DZIECHCLAR,forestry operation
Wiszniew Wolozyn MELCER, Ch comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn MELCER, S fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn MELZER, K felt factory
Wiszniew Wolozyn MILIKOWSKI, B fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn MILIKOWSKI, Sz fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn MINC, Sz fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn NAGROBECKI, S and E comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn NASIELSKI, I baker
Wiszniew Wolozyn NOCHIMOWSKA, F hardware
Wiszniew Wolozyn OLEWINSKI, S shoes
Wiszniew Wolozyn PIETRAK, M cement products
Wiszniew Wolozyn PITLIC, M fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn POBOL, B (x) pharmacy
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBERESKA, D retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBERESKA, P inn
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBERESKA, R ready-made clothes
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBERESKI, I blacksmith
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBEREZKA, Ch drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBEREZKA, N fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODBIERSKI, M butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn PODZELWER, dr. Girszon physicians
Wiszniew Wolozyn POTARZNIK, A fabric Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn PRACA, STOW. SPOZ., (x) cooperative
Wiszniew Wolozyn PYSKLO, J barber-surgeon/feldsher
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, B variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, J fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, J retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, M drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, S fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, S variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn RAPOPORT, M pitch factory Slajkowszczyzna
Wiszniew Wolozyn RODZIEWICZ, B (x) tobacco
Wiszniew Wolozyn ROZENTAL, H tea dealer/tea shop/cafe
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUBIN, B linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUBIN, B shoes
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUBIN, M iron
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUBIN, S retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUDENSKI AND BERKOWSKI, J, L mill mot
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUDEWSKI,Lew commander of volunteer fire dept
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUDNIK, J(x) retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUDNIK, Sz variety store/sundries
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUSOWICZ, W mill Kociowszczyzna Slajkowszczyzna
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUSZCZYC, F mill Dolkniewicze
Wiszniew Wolozyn RUSZCZYC, Regina landowner 250
Wiszniew Wolozyn SADOWSKA, J comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn SANANOWICZ, Jan veterinary aide
Wiszniew Wolozyn SKLEPOWICZ, J comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn SORSER, M fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn SPOLDZIELNIA OSADNIKOW WOJSKOWYCH,
(x) cooperative
Wiszniew Wolozyn STOLER, N butcher
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZAJBEL, M book binder
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZANIAWSKI, Marjan landowner 264
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZAPIRO, R drygoods/notions
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZCZEDREWSLO, A brickworks Karlinowo
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZWARC, M cobbler/shoe repair
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZYMSZELEWICZ, M fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZYMULEWICZ, J barber-surgeon/feldsher
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZYRO, I fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn SZYSZKO, N cheese
Wiszniew Wolozyn TOMKIEWICZ, S comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn TRABSKA, F fabric
Wiszniew Wolozyn TWO ZAKLADOW ZYRARDOWSKICH,(x)linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn WALKOWICZ, J photography
Wiszniew Wolozyn WEJSZENARES, M ready-made clothes
Wiszniew Wolozyn WILENSKI, S fabric Bukatowo
Wiszniew Wolozyn WISNIEWO S.A.,(x)wood industry Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn WISNIEWO S.A., (x) sawmill Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn WISNIEWSKI, A comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZAJC, K wheelwright
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZEBRPWSLO, W wholesale salt Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZEGALSKA, M wool combs Bohdanow
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Ch cheese
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Ch iron
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, F ready-made clothes
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, G retail brewery + bar
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, G comestibles
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, S (x) hardware
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Sz linen/flax
Wiszniew Wolozyn ZWIAZEK SPOLDZ. STOW. SPOZ., (x)
cooperative Bohdanow
\.
-

My grandmother, Matka nee Dolgov the wife of Yakov Weisbord was a relative of Chaim Avramson, Yehoshua and Cheina Rabinovitz and Zvi Dudman. I know that I was named after her mother, Bela nee Avramson. I remember that Chaim Avramson came to say goodbye to my grandmother in Volozhin before leaving to Ertz Israel., this was around 1925, many years later he was the mayor of Kfar Azar county in Israel and the editor of the Vishnevo Yizkor book. Yehoshua Rabinovitz was a teacher in Vishnevo, when he came to Tel Aviv he gave me a picture of my sister with him and his sister Chiena. Cheina was a partisan during the war and together with other partisans from Vishnevo - burned the town down in revenge for the towns' natives who helped the Germans kill the Jews that lived next door to them for so many years. Cheina came to Israel with a little girl that she had while she was hiding in the woods with the partisans. Yehoshua was the mayor of Tel Aviv, his wife Geola lives in Tel Aviv in Shikun Lamed.
They had three sons. Zvi Dodman lived with my family when he studied in Volozhin I knew his first wife and children, after his first wife died he left for Israel (in the 1930's about the same time as I ) he married again and his son was with him in Israel. His Daughter (Raisa Israeli?) was in Lithuania, she survived the war and came to Israel. The son Zalman Dudman Duday was killed while fighting the independence war in Haifa on 4-15- 1948.
Bela nee Kramnick

picture of my relatives, Zvi Dudman, Chaim Avramson and Yehushua Rabinovitz
Israel -

Dear Colleagues!

I want to inform all that Evgeny Anishchenko published a monograph
"The Pale of the Settlement: The Belorussian Synagogue During the
Reign of Catherine II (Minsk, 1998) - 160 pp. Dr. Anishchenko (1955)
is a researcher at the History Institute of the Belorussian National
Academy of Sciences and expert on the history of Belorussia in the
16th-18th centuries. The present work is the first serious attempt
made in Belorussia to examine the complex economic and political
processes which took place in the north-west region of the Russian
empire in the late 18 century. No studies of this kind have yet
been undertaken in Ukraine or Russia, a large part of the areas of
which were also included in the Pale of Settlement. Anishchenko, a
native Belorussian, provides vivid insight into the history of the
Pale's esteblisment and development, revealing the unique features
of its economic growth and introducting the reader to little known
facts of Jewish life in Vilna, Grodno, Polotsk, Mogilev and Minsk
provinces.

The monograph is written in Russian, has name and geographical indexes.
It is published in only 500 copies. If anybody need it, please, let me
know:
mailto:smilov@netvision.net.il

Sincerely yours,
Leonid Smilovitsky, Ph. D.,
Jerusalem.




.
-

Podberski, Y
ID(UCT) 12655
Reg. Volume 10
Ref. Nr. 501
Date entered. 05-02-1909
First name Y
Surname Podberski
Gender
Age 19
Birthplace Vilna
Mar. Status s
Nr. of Children -1
Place from Bremen
Occupation locksmith
In via
Stay 1
Date left
Place to Brazil/Sao Paulo
Eventual dest.
Ship Aragon
Agent
Notes Aragon left 1909.02.19


Ragowem, H
ID(UCT) 812
Reg. Volume 3a
Ref. Nr. 464
Date entered. 03-02-1899
First name H
Surname Ragowem
Gender
Age 44
Birthplace Vilna
Mar. Status m
Nr. of Children 5
Place from Grimsby
Occupation carpenter
In via
Stay -1
Date left
Place to America
Eventual dest.
Ship
Agent
Notes America Per Kolm


Ragowem, W
ID(UCT) 813
Reg. Volume 3a
Ref. Nr. 465
Date entered. 03-02-1899
First name W
Surname Ragowem
Gender
Age 26
Birthplace Vilna
Mar. Status s
Nr. of Children -1
Place from Grimsby
Occupation smith
In via
Stay -1
Date left
Place to America
Eventual dest.
Ship
Agent
Notes America Per Kolm



search the Poor Jews' Temporary Shelter Database
-

Does anyone have any light to shed on the surname Aleskevitz? I just found
out that this was my great grandmother's family name. Son of ?
Thanks,
Ruth Hyman

There were many aleskevitzs/ Elishkevitz in volozhin ( picture of Volozhin Eliskevitz; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/volozhin/vol_images/20601_8_b.gif and Vishnevo Welcome to the Vishnevo Site click to see pictures and to read stories. One of the stories is by my relative Dvora...."These stories were told to me by my Mother of blessed memory, Chaia Elishkevich Rogovin from Vishnevo. The period covered is from World War I (1915) until her Aliyah to Eretz Israel in October, 1938."

read the story of the Elishkevitz family during world war I.
From the list of perished in Vishnevo
Elishakevitz:

1. Fruma Rokhl
2. Khonon
3. Rivke, his wife
4. Their daughter
5. Sore (Sarah) Dvore
6. Itke, their daughter
7. Rivke, their daughter
8. Herschel
9. Rokhl, his wife
10. Chaim, their son
11. Esther, their daughter
12. Chaya, their daughter
13. Leybl
14. Meier Yitzhak
15. Pasha, his wife
16. Esther, their daughter
17. Reyzl, their daughter
18. Batia, their daughter
19. Zisl, their daughter
20. Moshe, their son
21. Srul
22. Luba
23. Yosef
24. Zelda, his wife
25. Natan, their son
26. Mordechai
27. Chaya, his wife
28. Yakov, their son
29. Sore (Sarah), their daughter
30. Risha, their daughter
31. Fruma, their daughter
32. Yosef
33. Chaya, his wife
34. Penina, their daughter
35. Avraham, their son
36. Yakov Tzvi
37. Teybl, his wife
38. Benyamin, their son
39. Chaim, their son
40. Simkhe
41. Leah
42. Dovid Hirsh
43. Baruch
44. Chashke
45. Her husband
46. All their children
47. Nechama (Bubke) Leybovitz
48. Leybovitz, her husband and their children--two girls
49. Avraham Yitzhak
50. Sima
51. Malka
52. Rokhl
53. Bonke
54. Her husband and the children
55. Chava, her husband and the chldren
56. Henia [Chienna?]
57. Fige and her mother
58. Yitzhak
59. Rokhl
60. Reuven
61. Yakov
62. Khonon
63. Rivke, his wife
64. Their children
from the list of the perished in Volozhin;
Elyashkevits Golda, her son Shimon Elyashkevits Hirsh, his wife Masha, Elyashkevits Israel, his wife Lifsha, Elyashkevits Shimon, his wife Rivka, Elyashkevits Yosef, his wife Haya, their daughter Pnina
as you can see each person spelled the name another way - in hebrew Aleskevitz-Elyashkevits- Elishakevitz:-Elishkevich are the same name. Vishnevo Links look at the first link.


of ?
Thanks,
Ruth Hyman



read the story of the Elishkevitz family during world war I
-

ZONAL STATE ARCHIVES IN MOLODECHNO
Address: 69, Libavo-Romenskaya St., Molodechno, 222310, Republic of Belarus
Tel: (375-017-73) 7-26-76, 7-77-33

Director: Rostislav F. Gerasimovich

Previous names:
State Archives of Vileika region (1940-1944),
State Archives of Molodechno Region (1944-1960),
Branch of the State Archives of Minsk Region in Molodechno (1960-1996)

Historical information. The State Archives of Vileika Region was established in 1940. Since June 1941, the activities of the Archives had been temporarily stopped by the Nazi invasion. The archives were moved to the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.
In July 1944, the State Archives started its work again in Vileika. The same year, the Vileika region was reorganized as Molodechno region. The State Archives of Vileika Region was renamed the State Archives of Molodechno Region and was transferred to Molodechno.
In 1960, the State Archives of Molodechno Region was reorganized as the Branch of the State Archives of Minsk Region in Molodechno. In 1963, the Archives of Vileika, Volozhin, Molodechno and Myadel districts were abolished and their holdings were moved to Molodechno. In September 1996, the Branch of the State Archives of Minsk region in Molodechno was renamed as the Zonal State Archives in Molodechno.

Amount of holdings: 1,736 fonds (149 fonds of the Polish period and 1,578 fonds of the Soviet period), 236,605 items (45,523 items of the Polish period 1919-1939, and 191,082 items of the periods 1939-1941, 1944-1995),
2,172 linear metres

Chronological period: from 1919 to the present

Territory: The documents on history of the Western Belarus of the Polish period cover the territory of Braslav,Vileika, Vilno-Troki, Volozhin, Disna, Dunilovichi, Molodechno, Oshmyany, Postavy and Sventsyany povets of Vilno province of Poland.
The documents on history of the Soviet Western Belarus cover the territory of the former Molodechno region, and also Vileika, Volozhin, Molodechno and Myadel districts of Minsk region.

Brief holdings description: The most interesting fonds are those of Vilno voevoda's administration and Vilno okrug land administration, of povet starostvs, povet land administrations, povet commandant's offices of state police, povet committees on land allotment and okrug electoral commissions on elections to Seim and Senat.
The documents of Vilno voevoda's administration, 1919-1939, and Vilno okrug land administration, 1919-1933, contain information about realization of agrarian reform in the territory of the above mentioned povets of Vilno voevodstvo, classification of lands and their evaluation, structure of land-ownership, giving allotments to soldiers and civilian osadniks, conducting the parcelling of land,sending the peasants to work in khutors (separated farm), selling the land plots and land properties to peasants and citizens, giving loans to peasants and osadniks, the exaction ofrent and payment for plots, granting the peasants a right to use and liquidate servitutos, the compulsory repayment of land properties into the state property, the transfer, recognition and deprivation of property rights on land plots, the transfer and acceptance of land plots and land properties into state property, the setting of bounds and measurement of land plots.
The documents also keep the lists of buyers and owners of the land, khutor peasants, peasants without land and those having it insufficiently and others.
The other fonds of the Polish period contain information on agriculture, industry, education, penetration of foreign capital, fiscal policy, the state of workers and peasants, economic, political and moral state of the povets, closing of Belarusian schools, activities of the Polish political parties and public organizations, the Communist party of Poland and Western Belarus, Young Communist League (Komsomol) of Western Belarus, Belarusian Workers' and Peasants' Gramada, Association of Belarusian schools, elections to the Seim and Senat, etc.
The fonds of the okrug commission on election to Seim and Senat of Poland contain the lists of voters, which are used when performing consular and genealogical inquiries.
In the fonds of the povet starostvs there are more than 4,000 items of cartographical documents, which present projects and plans of boroughs, villages, state and private estates, church lands, plans of land reclamation measures and land classification, maps of povets, estates etc.
The documents on history of Western Belarus in the Soviet period cover the territory of the former Molodechno region and also Vileika, Volozhin, Molodechno and Myadel districts of Minsk region.
The main group of records of the Soviet period is formed by the documents of local authorities and administration and also by documents of state and people's control bodies. Attention should be paid to the documents of people's courts, prosecutor offices,maintenance of public order bodies, departments of Molodechno region executive committee, municipal and districts executive committees, Molodechno region and districts agency of statistics, Board of directors of broadcasting network.
The documents contain information on nationalization and confiscation of private enterprises and buildings of the well-to-do inhabitants of the Western Belarus after joining the Soviet Belarus; preparation, conducting and the results of elections to the higher and local authorities and people's courts, observance of Socialist law and maintenance of public order, development of different branches of national economy, collectivization in Western Belarus, Nazi damage, criminality and prevention of crimes, etc.
The documents of the Soviet of People's Deputies of Molodechno region, its executive committee, municipal and district Soviets and executive committees, Molodechno region prosecutor office contain information on people subjected to repression in the period 1939-1940 (kulaks and exiled persons), history of town streets in Vileika, Volozhin, Molodechno etc.
The documents of authorized councils on religion and the affairs of Russian Orthodox Church [Upolnomochenny sovet po delam religii and russkoy pravoslavnoy tserkvi] contain information concerning the amount and state of churches, cathedrals and other buildings of worship, the amount of registered religious communities, quantitative and qualitative composition of believers,control of the performance of religious ceremonies by the state governmental bodies.
The complex of documents of the pre-war period 1939-1941 is presented by partially preserved documents from 59 fonds. The most interesting among them are the documents of Vileika region prosecutor's office about criminal cases on espionage, high treason,sabotage, counter-revulutionary activities, illegal crossing of the state border.



http://www.president.gov.by/gosarchives/EItd/ETK_FR.htm

The Belarusian archives
USA -

Dear All,

In recent months it has become apparent that some researchers in the employ
of the Belarus Archives have attempted to monopolise all requests for
research. Prime amongst these is an individual involved in a firm which has
figured prominently in recent discussions on the SIG. The archive itself
has attempted also, at about the same rates as these researchers, to control
access to records.

At the moment the official National Archive rates are as follows:
1. Family name search $80.00; This is just an initial search to
determine if information exists in the archive. If it does the archive
‘negotiates’ a price for releasing the information. You can pretty much
count on a charge of at least $200.00 on top of the original $80.00
2. A full search with a family tree will cost $500.00; that’s on top,
once again, of the original $80.00. None of this includes copies or
translations. By the time one’s finished the total price will be $700-$800.
I think all of this underlines the point that I made several months ago:
any arrangement which results in the archive being the sole provider of
research will result in deep price gouging.

It is still possible, however, to have private research done by reliable
researchers. Again, I should point out that I am not a disinterested party
and that the East European Jewish Heritage Project does derive funding from
genealogical research. Consequently we can be seen to be competitors to the
archive and to other researchers. The price information above, then, should
be seen as factual while the rest of this message is opinion.

Best regards,

Frank


Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS, DONATE NOW: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm



East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd
-

My FRANKEL grand aunt was married to Simon Persky from Volozhin/Visnevo, so if you come across a Simon, let me know
Diane Pressman Frankel
North Miami Beach, FL
dlfrankel@mindspring.com

Diane Pressman Frankel dlfrankel@mindspring.com
USA -

Dear Eilat,

Thank you for your lovely site.

Attached here is what we have in our database. Our spellings are a bit different than yours - they aren't in English but in the vernacular languages.

bhrsrch@post.tau.ac.il (Danna Paz Prins)
Beth Hatefutsoth
Beth Hatefutsoth, the Nahum Goldmann Museum of the Jewish Diaspora conveys the story of the Jewish people from the time of their expulsion from the Land of Israel 2,500 years ago to the present. It relates the unique story of the continuity of the Jewish people through exhibition, education and cultural endeavors, providing multiple avenues of personal historical identification. Our hope is that by sharing the unique story of Jewish endurance, new generations may find the key to their own. Many come and try: young and old, religious and secular, Israelis and tourists, civilians and soldiers.

The idea of establishing Beth Hatefutsoth was originally proposed in the late 50's by Dr. Nahum Goldmann, born in Vishnevo in 1894, who was the founder and then President of the World Jewish Congress.The idea was to create a monument to the Jewish Diaspora, past and present. The final conception of the Museum was based on the poet's Abba Kovner's proposal to divide the Permanent Exhibition into six thematic sections. When the Museum opened in May 1978, Beth Hatefutsoth was regarded by many Museum experts as one of the most innovative Museums in the world. It created a whole new concept of museum and has influenced Museum culture since. Today Beth Hatefutsoth has evolved into far more than a Museum: it impacts and touches the lives of Jews not just in Israel but throughout the world. It is truly, in every sense of the word, a Museum of the Jewish people.
click here for Beth Hatefutsoth
-

From: Sid Moosnick
Organization: MindSpring Enterprises
Subject: "Za-pru'-gy" or "Za-pru'-gin" info requested
Comments: To: Multiple recipients of JewishGen
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Requesting any info on this village near Volozhin, Olshan, and
Vishnevo. Don't know correct spelling; the above is phoenetic.

Today the area is part of Belarus. Pre WWI it was part of Lithuania;
between WWI and 1941 it was part of Poland.

Zaprugy/Zaprugin not listed in ShtetlSeeker. While my mother and aunt
described it as a Christian village, they were born there on my
grandfather's farm.

Any info would be most appreciated. TIA

Sid Moosnick


-=-
Email address: smoosnick@mindspring.com


click for map of the area
-

Reuven Rogovin is not a relative. My mother explains that there were several ROGOVINS in Valozhin and Vishnevo, many were not directly related. Perhaps there is a common relationship, but I do not know. I will send you the family tree from my ROGOVIN relatives. I can send it as a Word file. My mother and father are first cousins. His parents are CHERTOW..from Minsk. Chaim and Chaya. They emigrated to America in 1906, 3 months before my father was born. Since my grandfather already had a sister in Chicago, that is where he went. My mother's parents are Moshe and Hinde ROGOVIN. Chaya was a sister to Hinde Their name was Mordochovitch..and they come from a large family from Derevno which is near Valozhin. So my grandmothers were sisters.

My father wanted to see the Old Country and left Chicago in October 1930 and returned to America the following year.. maybe October, 1931. But he brought my mother with him. They were married in Valozhin in June, 1931. I have a journal of his travels throughout Europe, visiting family.

My brother went to a reunion of the Perski family from Valozhin. He desiged a map of Valozhin, which I have. I can email that to you also.

I work in spurts on the ROGOVIN family tree. Now you renewed my interest once again.
Keep me informed.
LAUREL

.
USA -

Thank you very much! Some of the information I knew -- for example that the Brisker Rav Soloveitchik's mother was an Efron. I will need to check the other information, which is new, and see if it can connect information for me. For example, I know that there are relations between Lurias and Efrons in one branch of the Efrons, which must be the branch from where the Vishnevo Efrons come.

Many thanks,

Jim

Jim Yarin & Suzi Solomon-Yarin
Somerville, MA
Yarin@rcn.com
http://users.rcn.com/yarin/Index.html

Jim Yarin & Suzi Solomon-Yarin site
USA -

http://istg.rootsweb.com/newcompass/pcindex.html

The Compass is a guide to assist you in your search for immigrant related information. Our aim is to provide you with the best and most up-to-date information available with special emphasis on passenger lists, ships, ship images and descriptions, emigrant and ethnic databases, and resources such as archives, libraries and museums both on-line and off-line. There are indepth descriptions of each site, and some, due to the extensive amount of information, are listed under more than one topic.



click for immigrant related information
USA -

Eilat,

Thanks for letting me know about the commemoration in Volozhin. Since
my grandfather was born there in 1896, I have a special feeling for it.
He said as a child in Vishneva, more than anything he loved to visit his
family in Volozhin. Unfortunately, his mother died in 1900-01,
orphaning him and three siblings. He always talked about the warmth of
the mishpokhe in both Vishneva and Volozhin. Coming to New York was
very difficult for him.

I would love to go to Volozhin. Unfortunately it's a long way and quite
expensive for me. Someday. I've tentatively considered taking a
genealogical trip to Lithuania with Howard Margol, of the Litvak SIG, in
September. At that time, if I go, I plan to visit Belarus also.

I was under the impression that Franklin Swartz of the East European
Heritage Project was overseeing the renovation of the old yeshiva in
Volozhin, to change it from a bakery to a Jewish landmark. I wonder if
that was just a dream.

Eilat, do you have any idea how I can get information about my
great-grandmother, Rachel Persky, born in Volozhin and died in Vishneva
(1900-01)as Rachel Rabinovich? This was my grandfather's mother. He
loved her very much and missed her terribly. My cousin is named for her
and wants to know more about her. But I can't seem to find any
information on the Belarus SIG or the Litvak SIG. She would have been
born in the 1870's, I imagine.

Let me know when you get the photographs!

Cheers,

Diane

.
USA -

From: unkala@earthlink.net (Saul Meltzer)
To: EilatGordn@aol.com




My name is Saul Meltzer......My grandfather Abraham Jacob was from Volozhin as was his father Moshe and many more Meltzers back to before the time of the Vilna Gaon. A young cousin of mine, Jonathan Meltzer was able to reach me through the web site I created for my grandfather.

Today, Jon e-mailed me with the links to the Volozhin site and I was very excited when I opened it. Any and all information that I'd be able to obtain from you would be very much appreciated......My grandfather had ten children and all but three, were born in Volozhin.

Saul Meltzer
unkala@earthlink.net

PS....I already called my son Yoel in Yerushaliyam with the news that Shimon Peres is his fourth or fifth cousin and told him to try and contact him.






Saul Meltzer unkala@earthlink.net
USA -

Thank you so much for the information and web sites. Still trying to find related Meltzer families from Volozhin. My ggf's name was Lazer Shmuilov Sklut-Meltzer and he was living in Volozhin in 1910 according to his passport/travel papers.

Eddie Meltzer
USA -

Eilat, this is simply amazing! Thank you. I am sending this to my father, Herman, age 87.



Richard Rogovin rrogo@micron.net
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Subj: SV: Jewish and non-Jewish families sharing the same last name
Date: 1/17/01 12:07:29 PM Pacific Standard Time
From: adam.katzeff@mail.bip.net (Adam Katzeff)
To: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org (Belarus SIG)



Dear all,

All the messages so far in this discussion have had the conclusion that
Christians families with the same surname as your Jewish ancestors must have
converted at any time in history. This is my two cents to the discussion:

It's a wellknown fact that many Eastern European surnames appears in Jewish
as well as Christian families, without any connection between the two
groups. One good source for this discussion is Alexander Beider's two books
about surnames in the Russian empire and the Kingdom of Poland. Sometimes
the Jewish and the Christian surnames have different origin and sometimes
they have the same origin.

Why did Jews used the same surnames as Christians? There is no absolute
answer to this, but there are some things that can be a part of the reason:

*Toponymic surnames derived from placenames is known to have been used by
both Jews and Christians.

*Surnames going back on characteristics for the bearers could naturally be
used both by Jews and Christians.

*Very few Eastern European Jews had surnames before 1800, while Christians
used surnames much earlier. Even if the authorities wanted Jews to adopt
surnames that would distinguish them from the Christians, certainly many
Jews took surnames that already were in use in the Christian society around
them.

To round of, I'm giving one example from my own family on a surname that
seems to have been used by both Jews and Christians in the former Russian
empire:

*The surname NEMETS, with many different derivates as for example NEMTSOV,
NEMCHENKO, NEMTSOVITSKIJ, NEMCHIK etc, all goes back to the Slavic world
"nemets/nemec", which today means "German". In old days it was used for
people who spoke with an accent as well as dumb/mute ones. These surnames
are not uncommon among Jews, but it seems like they were even more common
for Christians all over Eastern Europe.

Best regards

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

adam.katzeff@mail.bip.net

Researching:
LEVINTAL / LEVINTHAL: Surazh+Vitebsk+Yanavichy, Belarus
NEMTSOV / NEMZOFF: Vitsebsk, Belarus; Sweden; Denmark
NEMCHENKO / NEMCHENOK / NEMTSCHENKO: Mstislavl+Surazh+Vitsebsk+
Yanavichy, Belarus; St Petersburg, Russia; Sweden
NIVOROSHKIN / NEWOROSCHKIN / NIVAROSCHKIN / NIWOROSCHKIN:
Astrouna+Surazh, Belarus; Sweden; Denmark; New York, NY, USA




.
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I come from the Rogovin, Farberman, Kagan family from Volozhin, and would like to get any information I can from other descendents of these families. Robert B. Rogoff
Robert B. Rogoff LRR18@aol.com
Passaic , NJ USA -

Rabbi Zundel Loria Came to Vishnevo from Slovak when he married Elka, the daughter of Rabbi Yehoshua- Heshel Margalit (Perlman).
Zundels' father was the renowned rabbi of Slovak, Bezalel Loria.
Beginning with the day Rabbi Yehoshua Heshel Perlman left Vishnevo for Eretz Yisrael, to become the Rabbi of Rehovot- his son in law, Rabbi Zundel Loria took his place, and was the Vishnevo Rabbi until his premature death in 1924.
His Daughters Bluma Rubin and Zerna Aharoni, recall him frequently sitting by the table and reading from the Gmara. Sometimes, during cold winter nights, when the girls awoke in a midnight hour, they would see light coming from his room and the sound of a soft somber tune will resonant in the house.
He had a unique way of showing affection to his daughters, in the midst of intense reading of the Gmara he will summon the girls embrace them and caress their faces and that would make them feel that they are much loved. He was a very honest man and the truth was dictating his steps like a candle in the dark. He did not hesitate to speak the truth openly even when facing other leaders of the community. Sometimes this quality would cause him some unpleasantness however everyone respected and loved him.
The daughters write that their mother Elka was foremost a Yiddishe Mama, just talking about her fill their hearts with warm feelings. She knew when to be quite and when to forgive and she had a great insight concerning their feelings. She was clever and refined. She had a lot of common sense and talents. She loved to read books and knew the bible well. Her father would often tell her "with your talents if you were a boy you would have been a rabbi". The family came to Vishnevo when She was five years old. Her father became the town Rabbi.
When Rabbi Zundel Lorria passed away, he was replaced by a relative, Rabbi Efron.
Rabbi Efron was a good-looking man. He was tall and strong with a long beard, he was very learned and clever man. He had a liberal approach to life and treated everyone with respect and love, young and old, religious or non-religious was all respected by him. For that, he was respected by the entire community. In1927 he made "Aliyah" to Eretz Yisrael and replaced Rabbi Margalit (Perlman) as the Rabbi of Rehovot, for health reasons he returned to Vishnevo and later move to Shtzozin to become the rabbi. He perished in Stzotzin. His son moved to a kibbutz in Israel and died there in 1934.
From the Vishnevo Yizkor book.
Email of the grandson of Rabbi Margialit/Perlman and descendant of Rabbi Chaim of Volozhin poratm@netvision.net,il
Israel -

Dear Eilat Gordon,
Hello. Are you related to the Podbereskis, and if so how? I believe that that the Gordon were first cousins to Zev Wolf (my great grandfather) but I don't know how they are related. Can you tell me more? Also, is there and English translation of the Hebrew on the pictures you have posted? You may post some photos on your site and link to my site.
Thank you.
Zane Buzby


click here for the Podbereski site
USA -

Thank you again for the excellent web pages and also for your responding with Persky and Bunomovitch families from Vishnevo. I am sorry I did not find the Volozhin
site before writing in the Vishnevo site! I hope your data will continue to expand.
I know at least parts of the Volozhin Yizkor Book have been translated as well as the the list of Volozhiners who died in 1942. Your data has made me aware of the
importance of knowing more about the communities and their residents in the vicinity of our ancestral communities. I have done fairly well with the help of others
in researching my Persky family but only back to my great (and great-great ) grandfather
Eliyahu Zvi Persky. I have not done well on the Bunamovitch family.
Thanks again
and I hope to keep up with your web pages.
Rena Weiner
Shankman, Memphis, Tn., USA
Researching: PERSKY, BUNOMOVITCH, LEIBMAN, CHASSMAN of Volozhin
and Ivye; WEINER, WISE, LEVER, KREGER of
Joneskelis and
Vashki, Lith; SHANKMAN/SHEINKMAN, CHAITMAN,
ADLER,
PEARLMAN/PERELMAN of Retchka, Mozyr and
Nevitzh (?).


.
USA -

A picture of The Podbereski Family, c. 1901
Pictured L to R: Ethel Farberman Gordon (relative of actress Lisa Kudrow), Esther Genya (Stepmother), Philip Podbereski, Zev —Wolf (Velvel) Podbereski, Libby-Duska Podbereski, Rivka-Baila Podbereski
Not Pictured: Max Podbereski Gordon (changed to Gordon upon arrival in America) who studied at the Yeshiva in Volozhin and emigrated to America to escape the Russian army. Jewish boys and men drafted into the Russian army were expected to complete 25 years of service.
Basha-Ita Danishefsky Podbereski (Mother) died c. 1898).
http://www.russiansamovars.com/immigrants.htm
The Podbereski Family






click for the picture at the bottom of the page
USA -

The pictures are very interesting. Does anyone know anything about who they are or the circumstances of the photos?
Norma K. Stone normastone@aol.com
USA -

From the list of Jews whom perished in Vishnevo;
Bunomovitch Leib, his wife Yelda their son Herzel.
Bunomovitch Akiva
Buminovitch Reyzel with one son.
Persky Yakov
Persky Rachel
Persky Eliezer
Prezky Zisel
Perzky Pasha
Perzky Yitzhak Mordechai
----------------------------
Shimon and Gershon Peres father was Gezel Persky, he wrote in the Vishnevo
Yizkor book. One of his sisters was Eltka who married Yitzhak Rabunski
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/rabunski.html. her family
picture. Rabunski she perished in Kurenets.
she had four children; Leo and Wolf who survived the war- Chana and Yakov
perished. to read Wolf story, The Struggle to Survive
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_struggle.html. to
read his son Jay story;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_memoir_infancy.html

there is a picture of Zelda Buminovitch with two sons in the Vishnevo site
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_images/12_6_2vish_b.gif also
l
look at the Welcome to the Volozhin Site
-

Thank you for the interesting website. My maternal grandfather
Benyomin Yitzkah PERSON (PERSKY)from Volozhin and his brother
Yehuda Leib PERSKY from Volozhin and Ivye immigrated to
Louisville, Ky. Two brothers Samuel and Moshe Yonah Perski
remained in Volozhin. They were the sons of Eliyahu Zvi
Perski and cousins of Shimon Peres' family. Their mother
was Esther (Bunimovitch) Perski and there was probably a
sister Rifka (for whom I was named). The Volozhin Yiskor
book lists many who were killed in Volozhin in 1941, including
many Perski and Bunomovitch families. Does anyone know the
names of the Vishnevo Perski and Bunomovitch families?
Rena Weiner Shankman rwrshank@bellsouth.net
Memphis, Tn USA -

INFORMATION FROM THE VISHNEVO YIZKOR BOOK.
Vishnevo next to Volozhin, Latitude: 54_08' Longitude: 26_14'


According to the Russian encyclopedia in 1796 when the Russians took control of the area there were 219 Jews in the town. In 1892 there was a total of 1849 inhabitants. according to the Russian Jewish encyclopedia in 1844 there were 336 Jews and in 1897 Vishnevo and the neighboring villages had a population of 2650 and 1463 of them were Jews. According to the Polish (in 1921 it became
part of Poland until 1939) there were 1000 Jews in 1928. On August 30, 1942, the day of the town's destruction, 1100 Jewish men, women, and children were cruelly murdered. the original settlement of the jews in the area was in Bogdonova five miles away. Graf Charpatovitz made his Vishnevo land available for lease to the Jews. Many Jews took his offer and moved to Vishnevo. In the 1800s' there were two very wealthy Jews in Vishnevo; Kopel and Chaim Isar Berkman. well known natives of vishnevo; Shimon Peres (Perski, Meltzer and Zusman) Zionist leader Nachum Goldman (Dudman), Yehoshua Rabinowitz who was the seventh mayor
of Tel Aviv. Abraham Dickenstein the head of the bank of Israel. Some names from Vishnevo; ELISHKEVITZ, EIZKOVITZ, EZIKOVITZ, ASISHKIN, ABRAMOVITZ,
AGLONIK, ARZUKER, EPSTEIN,BRAKOVSKY, BERGMAN, BLOCH, BERKMAN, BUMINOVITZ,
BIKOVITZ, BOR, GIRSHOVITZ, GOLOV, GUMNITZ, GIRZON, GUREVITZ, GLICK,
GOLDSMITH, GORDON, GIRKUS, GITLITZ, GINSBURG, DORER, DAVIDSON, DUDMAN ,
DICKENSTEIN, HALPERIN,HEYMAN,HOFMAN, HORVITZ,HESSEL,ZUSMAN, ZACKS, CHAYKLIN,
CHEZKEVITZ, TRAVSKI, YUZIK, EINBINDER, YASEL, YACHAS, LAVIT, LEVIN,
LICHTERMAN, LUBSHENSKI, LIBERMAN,LIPKOVITZ, MILIKOVSKI, MELTZER, MINTZ,
MAGID, NOVOPROZKI, MISHKIN, STOLLER, SORAS, SOBOTNIK, PODBERESKI, PERSKI,
PERZKI, FORMAN, PATASHNIK, PODZVALER, PEYBISHOVITZ, ZIROLNICK, ZIPILEVITZ,
KOTTLER, KAPLAN, KOPILOVITZ, KOZLOVSKI, KOSHLINSKI,KOKIN, KARLZUK, KELMAN,
RABINOVITZ, ROZNICK, RESNIK, RUBIN, RODINSKI,ROSENBERG, ROGOVIN, SHUSTER,
SHRIRA, SHIMSHELOVITZ, SHIMSHY, SHAPIRA, SHISHKO, SHWARTZ, SHILOVSKI.
You will find many old pictures of the people of Vishnevo at;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/vishnevo.html,
Please sign the guest book.
Eilat Gordin Levitan. Los Angeles.
Searching : Gurevitz, Alperovitz, Zimerman, Shulman, Kramnick, Weisbord,
Shafer, Dolgov, Sosenski, Rogovin, Elishkevich. from; Kurenets, Dolginovo,
Vileyka, Myadel, Radeshkovichi, Volzhin and Vishnevo.

,
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Surname Given Name Middle Name Sex Birth Date Death Date Birth Place Death Place Social Security # Mother's Maiden Name Father's Surname
PODBERESKI GEORGE MALE 12/25/1896 02/15/1969 RUSSIA MONTEREY 325262418 BRODOWSK
PODBERESKI JERZY MALE 12/25/1896 02/15/1969 RUSSIA MONTEREY 325262418 BRODOWSK
1961 12 14 Piotrowski, Stanis aw Morel, 1939-40 12 15 Podbereski, Tereszczenko, Jerzy, 1948 13 1 Polam Novelty Company, 1939 13 2
URL: www.uwm.edu/Library/arch/findaids/uwmmss46.htm







Podbereski, Tereszczenko, Jerzy
USA -

Search Terms: PODBERESKY (1)
Database: WWI Civilian Draft Registrations
Combined Matches: 1
Name Birth Date Ethnicity Birth Place City/County State
Jake Podberesky 24 Aug 1882 W naturalized citizen Lauderdale# 1 MS
Death Year: 1956
File Number: 11286
Surname: PODBERESKY
First Name: ABRAHAM
Middle Initial:
Sex: Male
Month of Birth:  
Day of Birth:  
Year of Birth:1870
White
Hispanic Origin:
Age Units: Years
Age: 85
Month of Death: May
Day of Death: 04
Death State: Connecticut
Death County: New London
Death Town: Colchester
Birth State:  
Birth Town: VISHNEVO? 
Marital Status: Widowed
Decedent's Last Spouse: ESTHER
Education:  
State of Residence: Connecticut
County of Residence: New London
Town of Residence: Lebanon
Father's Surname:  
Death Year: 1986
File Number: 08554
Surname: MAYERSON
First Name: RAE NEE PODBERESKY
Middle Initial: E
Sex: Unknown
Month of Birth: November
Day of Birth: 23
Year of Birth: 1899
Race: White
Hispanic Origin:
Age Units: Years
Age: 86
Month of Death: April
Day of Death: 11
Death State: Connecticut
Death County:  
Death Town: Manchester
Birth State: Russia
Birth Town:  
Marital Status: Widowed
Decedent's Last Spouse: JACOB
Education:  
State of Residence: Connecticut
County of Residence:  
Town of Residence: Windham
Father's Surname: PODBERESKY
Residence House Number: 645
Residence Street Name: VALLEY
Residence Street Type: ST
Residence Zip Code: 06280
Usual Occupation: HOUSEWIFE
Industry: AT HOME
Death Year: 1981
File Number: 02412
Surname: PODBERESKY
First Name: ROSE
Middle Initial: K
Sex: Unknown
Month of Birth: July
Day of Birth: 05
Year of Birth: 1909
White
Hispanic Origin:
Age Units: Years
Age: 72
Month of Death: January
Day of Death: 29
Death State: Connecticut
Death County:  
Death Town: Windham
Birth State: New York
Birth Town:  
Marital Status: Married
Decedent's Last Spouse: WILLIAM
Education:  
State of Residence: Connecticut
County of Residence:  
Town of Residence: Windham
Father's Surname: KAPLAN
Residence House Number: 116
Residence Street Name: BRIDGE
Residence Street Type: ST
Residence Zip Code: 06280
Usual Occupation: RET. SCHOOL TEACHER
Industry: WILLIMANTIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
Death Year: 1993
File Number: 07385
Surname: SALOMON
First Name: LEAH
Middle Initial:
Sex: Female
Month of Birth: July
Day of Birth: 07
Year of Birth: 1993
Race: White
Hispanic Origin: No
Age Units: Years
Age: 99
Month of Death: March
Day of Death: 14
Death State: Connecticut
Death County: Windham
Death Town: Windham
Birth State: Russia
Birth Town: 999
Marital Status: Widowed
Decedent's Last Spouse: GOTTL
Education: Primary/Secondary
State of Residence: Connecticut
County of Residence: Windham
Town of Residence: Windham
Father's Surname: PODBERESKY
Residence House Number:  
Residence Street Name: VALLEY
Residence Street Type: ST
Residence Zip Code:  
Usual Occupation: ASST DESIGNER
Industry: GARMENT INDUSTRY


Find Your Ancestors
-

I was very pleased & delighted to read your message. My husband is a cousin
to Jeremy Ditelberg. My mother-in-law's maiden name was Weisberg
Weisbord). She was a sister to the Isaac mentioned below. What is your
connection with the Weisbords?
Libby Flum
Tamarac, FL


.
USA -

david & rose podbresky came to usa in early 1900 with four children - max, jack, sarah & celia. max served with the english brigade in palestine and jack served in the usa army during world war one. after the war both boys changed their names to PADELL.


portia padell katz
USA -

david & rose podbresky came to usa in early 1900 with four children - max, jack, sarah & celia. max served with the english brigade in palestine and jack served in the usa army during world war one. after the war both boys changed their names to PADELL.
portia padell katz
USA -

Dear All,

You should be aware that copies of documents purchased direct from the Minsk Archives cost all of $5.00. Translations done here for legal purposes are
seldom more than $10.00. In terms of prices for hand copying you should be aware that the director of the archive only makes about $30 a month. It
seems ironic to me, in light of this, that comments are sometimes made about the exploitative pricing of the National Archive.
. . .Hand-copy of records, in Russian: $50.00
Hand-copy of records, translated into English: $60.00 (i.e., $50 for copying
+ an additional $10 for the translation)
Scanned image of records: $20.00

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS, DONATE NOW: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm





Franklin J. Swartz
-

this picture (click on blue words to see)was taken in 1934, when the two sisters feldman visited their mother who was not well. however, she lived on till 1942. it was taken in either Kurenitz or Budonovah.( (five kilometers from Vishnevo) Anyone having any information about Faiga Racha nee levin Feldman or the two men, please send it to me. Arthur Wouk (awouk@nilenet.com)
picture of the Fedman/ Levin/Wouk family
-

Podbersky was the most common last name amongst the Jews of Vishnevo,
Podbersky v. Kirwan is a landmark case on questions of public school desegregation, the use of scholarships for minority students as affirmative action recruitment programs, and state responsibility to remedy past discrimination against historically black colleges and universities.

..
-

For immigration information,look at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/#Immigration

http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/begin.txt
supply basic information.

Write to the INS for the paternal GGF
citizenship file that cannot be obtained easily in person and should be the first thing requested in doing research in the US.
A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for "the full and complete citizenship file" of ____ is made to the following:
Director Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Program
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Department of Justice
425 Eye Street, N.W., 2nd Floor
ULLICO Building
Washington, D.C. 20536
(202) 514-1722

See: http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/foia/index.htm

INS websites are very useful for understanding what
is available:

http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/history/index.htm

Census records searches, etc. should follow after obtaining (or not)a citizenship file. Having the INS file first makes other research much easier.

Ellen Sadove Renck-NY



Immigration / Emigration
USA -

Dear Eilat ,

We want to wish , Danny and all your family A VERY HAPPY HEALTHY NEW YEAR . We hope that this coming year will be a year of SHALOM.
Thank you very much for all the information you gave us about Shlomo Rogovin.
About Youval's Web. --- The correct adress is:
www.geocities.com/vishnive

and not gtcy .

Now I am working on a new Web. which incloud my mother's stories about her life in vishnive and life in vishnive -- an aoutentic docoument from 1915 - 1938 , when she came to Eretz Israel. The adress is:
www.geocities.com/biography1915

My brather Zvika started to translate it into English and there are already some pages in English . He and his wife Judy and thier son Danny , are visiting us now for two weeks. Their son Yoav is married and lives in Tel Aviv for almost 3 years.
Stay well, Yours, Dvora

Youval's Web www.geocities.com/vishnive
Israel -

I thank you for writing me, but I looked at both web sites and found no
information or reference to any Efron family members. Can you tell me where
precisely you found this information? Thanks!

--Jim

Jim Yarin & Suzi Solomon-Yarin
Somerville, MA
Yarin@rcn.com
http://users.rcn.com/yarin/Index.html
-----
In the Vishnevo Yizkor book there is a list on pages 17 and 18 of
Vishnovan's natives, who made "Aliyah" to Eretz Yisrael from 1924 to 1933.
Their names were Ben Zion Dikenstein, Dudman Aharon,Dudman Sara, Heyman
Ester, Magid Pesach, Yuchas Sara,Rabinovitz Moshe, Meltzer Chana,Rogovin
Gershon,Gitliz Freidka, Kelman Rivka, Chaim Avramson and his family. They all
became members of kibbutz Hacovesh.
"Chalav vedvash" (the milk and honey troop whose most other members were
from the Ukraine) came with Avraham Dikenstein, Eli Kisin, and Buruch Efron,
the son of Rabbi Efron. Baruch passed away a year later from Pnumonia.
While Getzel Perski came to Palestine in 1933, his wife named Sara nee
meltzer, as well as his sons named Shimon and Gershon Peres, came in 1935.
Both Benyamin Ytzhak Dikenstein and his family, as well as the Avidan family
came in 1933.Aharon Zvi Duday Dudman came on illegal ship that was cought by
the British. He manged to escape.

Eilat eilatgordn@aol.com
-

An email I received from Herman Wouks'first cousin in regards to village Bedanova, a few miles away from Vishnevo and the original place from where most Jew later came to Vishnevo according to the Yizkor book.
Hi,
The web site is exceptional and Baruch Zukerman's testemonial evoked
emotions and provoked thought. But why do you think the Levine branch of my
family is from Kurenets? I have been under the impression that My zeide,
Mendel Leib Ha'levy (Levine), who was a rabbi in Minsk and then rabbi of the
Minske shul in New York City (and eventually immigrated to Israel in 1951 at
the age of 86) came from the town of Bedaneveh. As a youth, he studied under the son of the Natziv.(from Volozhin) If you know differently, or have any
information in this regard, I would be very interested.
All the best,
Meir Edelman

Israel -
.
USA -

From an email of Alan Rabunski....
...Here's another bit of family trivia - Shimon Peres and my father were first cousins. My father's mother was a Perski - she and Shimon's father were brother and sister. (Until Shimon's family changed their name in Palestine,he was a Perski.) According to information published in one of Shimon's books, we are also descended from Chaim Volozener, who was a student of the Vilna Gaon, and also founded a famous yeshiva in Volozhin which was well regarded in the 19th Century.
.
USA -

How did the Jews get to Lithuania and Belarus?
there were many Jews who after being expelled from Spain and Portugal,went to Holland and then took advantage of the opportunities offered by the magnates in what became Lithuania. These Jews brought urban life to rural Lithuania.
The town of Kupiskis, Lithuania, was originally populated by Jews who originated in Spain. They were joined, of course, by other Jews from Germany and Poland, etc. A number of the names of these early Jewish
families still exist such as Trapido.
The oldest graveyard in Kupiskis which no longer exists was 300-350 years old and contained the graves of these early Spanish Jews. You will find this throughout Lithuania.


Ann Rabinowitz
USA -
-
-

I just read your informative website.  Any information about the family HEYMAN(Yiddish)--GEJMAN(Russian), or HEJMAN(Polish)  in this Vishnevo Yizkor book?

Thank you,
Harold J. HEYMAN
Northbrook, IL
A picture of Ester HEYMAN, she is sitting on the far right.
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_images/61vish_old_b.gif (Vishnevo - Old Scenes #14)
Ester was an active member of  "Hachalutz" a zionist youth movement. In the picture there are many who made "Aliyah" to a kibbutz in Israel Ester was in the very first group from Vishnevo who made "Aliyah" in 1925, they lived in kibbutz "Hacovesh". life was very hard for them and some returned to Vishnevo.  They wrote in the Yizkor book that Ester was dead at the time the book was written and in the list of the people who perished  in1942 they wrote: Ester Heyman and her family and another Heyman family without any first names.
They also wrote about Rabbi David Heyman from Vishnevo, I think that he died in the U.S.A They said that he was brought for a burial to Israel .
there is a long list of Vishnevo natives who lived in Israel in 1970 and their addresses and phone #; I found Lea nee Heyman Goldbiter, 10 Smolanskin street, Tel Aviv.
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn HEJMAN, M/ baker from the 1929 Polish Business Directory for Vishnevo/ Wiszniew
I found much more information about the Zusmans, the father of Shimon Peres wrote about his uncle Shimshel Zusman- let me know if you would be interested to hear about it .
Eilat eilatgordn@aol.com
USA -

Dear Eilat,
Thank you for sending me information about Davidson's in Slonim and
Vishnevo. My maternal grandfather, Louis Osher Davidson, was born in Slonim
in 1893. He emigrated to the US in about 1905. His father was Osher and his
mother was Shayna. We are not aware of any relatives named Moshe or Leib,
and we do not think anyone in the family was Chasidic. But that is possible.
Other relatives from Slonim are my grandmother, Celia Berneger Davidson, and
my other grandparents, Zelda and Louis Miller (formerly Mishkin).
It would be very interesting to find out if my relatives are related to Joe
Erber's who wrote to you 12/29/00.
Betsy Miller Jennings

Betsy Miller Jennings bjennin1@ix.netcom.com
USA -

Search Results


Search Terms: PERSKI (1)
Database: Biography and Genealogy Master Index (BGMI)
Combined Matches: 1
894776
Perski, Ludwik 1912-
Who's Who in the Socialist Countries of Europe. A biographical encyclopedia of more than 12,600 leading personalities in Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Yugoslavia. Three volumes. Edited by Juliusz Stroynowski. Munich, Germany: K.G. Saur, 1989. (WhoSoCE 89)



-------------------------------------------------------
-

from the Jewishgen sig...
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 1994 08:42:39 -0500
From: Arlene.Parnes@f18.n363.z1.cgsg.com ()
Subject: PARNES FAMILY OF NYC
Message-ID: 774725082.AA00043@trace.cgsg.com

Hi: Please give me your snail mail address and I will give you my info. My
grandfather came to US around 1890 from VISHNEVETS. Parnes not original name.
Would be happy to correspond - Do you have an Internet address? - My family was
in the dress business in NY - Arlene

arlene.parnes@cornucopia.oau.org


Arlene Parnes
USA -

TO THE MEMORY OF THE ANCESTORS.

During the month the members of Polish historical centre were researching ancient burial grounds in our district. During their stay Ann and Yatsek Levkovsky and Voitekh Valchekh visited Soly, Krevo, Bolshaya Mysa, Panara, Stymony, Aslsventy and Strypuny. The researchers found that the oldest burial ground in our district is Zalessye cemetery. Not that where people bury today, but graves not far from the road to Myhnevitchy.

The oldest of them dates back to 1797. Others are from the middle of19th century. The names Sologub, Ruban and others testify that it is nobility cemetery. The historians say that these families had their own emblems and belonged to the social class of people serving the king. There are ancient graves of representatives of famous families such as Shabanobichy, Alexandrovichy, Ilyasevichy, Vforonovichy in the village of Dovbuchki. Vilnus judge Aly Krichevsky and Kiev general- governer are buried here. The slab from the grave of landowner Sventajetskaya is preserved in Bolshaya Mysa.

After their travel Ann Yatsek and Voitech are going to publish catalogue of ancient cemetery, existed in Smorgon, publish their plans, lists of names which they came across most of all, in order the tourists and relatives can find and pay homage to ancestors.




Òàòüÿíà Êëåùåíîê- "Íîâàÿ ãàçåòà Ñìî_ãîíè"
Smorgon -



Caracas.- Con el propósito de promover el Instituto Peres para la Paz, creado en Tel Aviv en octubre de 1997, el ex primer ministro de Israel y Premio Nobel de la Paz, Simón Peres, llega hoy al país para efectuar una visita privada de tres días, informó la agencia Venpres.

Peres arribará al aeropuerto internacional Simón Bolívar de Maiquetía a las 8:30 de la mañana, desde donde partirá en vuelo privado para el Parque Nacional Canaima.

Según la agenda oficial ofrecida por el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Peres pasará parte del domingo en el parque desde donde será trasladado en helicóptero al Salto Angel y luego mantendrá un encuentro con la comunidad indígena de la región. A las cuatro de la tarde está contemplado el regreso a Caracas.

El lunes 26 asistirá a un desayuno privado con el ex presidente venezolano, Carlos Andrés Pérez y se reunirá también con la dirección nacional de Acción Democrática.

Al mediodía sostendrá una reunión con el canciller Miguel Angel Burelli Rivas, en la Casa Amarilla y a la una de la tarde asistirá a un almuerzo ofrecido por el presidente de la República, Rafael Caldera, en el palacio de Miraflores.

A las tres de la tarde visitará la Universidad Católica Andrés Bello donde le será conferido el doctorado Honoris Causa; posteriormente efectuará un encuentro con estudiantes de todas las universidades del país.

En horas de la noche celebrará un encuentro con la comunidad judía residenciada en Venezuela.

El martes 27, último día de visita, Simón Peres asistirá a un desayuno con la nueva generación de la comunidad hebrea en el hotel Caracas Hilton. A las 8:30 será trasladado al aeropuerto internacional en Maiquetía, de donde partirá hacia la ciudad de Nueva York, Estados Unidos.

Peres, líder del Partido Laborista de Israel, visita a Venezuela a fin de promover el Instituto Peres para la Paz, que fuera creado en Tel Aviv en octubre de 1997 por iniciativa propia. Ha invitado al canciller Miguel Angel Burelli Rivas a formar parte de la Junta Internacional de Directores de la citada organización.

Simón Peres nació en 1923 en Vishniev, Belarús y emigró a Israel en 1934, donde efectuó sus estudios y desde muy temprana edad estrechó vínculos de amistad con los líderes del movimiento laborista en esa nación. Se inició en la política a los 16 años y posteriormente asumió la responsabilidad de comandar la tropa durante la independencia de Israel. El dirigente israelí tiene una amplia trayectoria política, durante la cual ha ejercido altos cargos, entre los cuales destaca el de primer ministro del Gobierno de Unidad Nacional.




Caracas
-

Letters from Tsar Nicholas to Tsaritsa Alexandra - March 1916
Stavka. 9 March, 1916.
MY BELOVED SUNNY,
I thank you most warmly for your dear letters, and for the love which enriches every one of your lines! I rejoice in them, drinking in each word of the letter, breathing its perfume, and pressing to my lips the paper which has been touched by your hands.How strange that the weather with you has suddenly changed, and that severe frosts have set in! Whereas here it is thawing rapidly - that is the chief reason why our offensive is beginning in a few days. If we wait another week, the trenches in many sectors of our front will be flooded with water and the troops would have to be taken very far back. If that happened they would be deprived of the chance of moving forward for a month or a month and a half, till the roads got dry.Then the Germans would undoubtedly attack us with an enormous mass of heavy artillery, as they did last summer. For this reason, therefore, it has been decided to take the initiative into our own hands, taking advantage of the onslaught at Verdun. May God guard and bless our valiant troops! I beg you not to tell anyone of this.Yesterday I went to a cinematograph which was particularly interesting, because we saw many photographs of Erzerum immediately after its fall. The high mountains are amazingly beautiful covered with deep snow, glistening in the sunlight.After this we saw two amusing pictures with Max Linder in the chief part - this would probably have appealed to the children.I am glad that you have found a new book for us to read aloud (for our reading aloud). Have those two books from Marshton (Marston) come yet from England? So far I have no time to read for my own pleasure, although I play dominoes in the evening every other day.Well, I think it is time for me to finish my letter. God guard you, my darling Wify, and our children! I kiss and embrace you all tenderly.Your old hubby NICKY.
NOTES: "Our offensive is beginning in a few days," In connection with this offensive (preceding the great offensive of Broussilov) the following passage from Ludendorff is worth quoting: "From the 18th to the 21st of March the situation of the 10th (German) Army was critical and the numerical superiority of the Russians overwhelming. On the 21st they won a success on the narrow lake sector which affected us gravely, and even the attack west of Postovy was only stemmed with difficulty" (P. 21 1). By the end of April, however, the 10th Army had regained the ground which it had lost between Lake Narotch and Lake Vishniev.(Vishnevo)
http://www.alexanderpalace.org/letters/march16.html




Letters from Tsar Nicholas to Tsaritsa Alexandra - March 1916
USA -

from an email I sent to LRROBBINS@aol.com
the Vishnevo Yizkor book is written in a strange way, the stories are blended according to a chronological order. in page 20 there is a story about Avraham- Eli Rabionovitz
...The grandfather of Yehoshua, Cheine and Yitzhak who are with us (In Israel) His image is in front of me. A short, skinny Jew that would walk erect with his head up high as if wanting to better observe the world and the men around. Sharp and knowledgeable in bible studies, he would pace back and forth repeating complete passages from the Talmud. Cheine Rabionovitz told me details of his earlier life: In his youth, he studied in the famous Rameila Yeshiva in Vilna, along with is well-known friend, the genius, "Chafetz Chayim". They studied together for days and nights, and both names became renowned, not only in the Yeshiva, but in the entire Jewish community. They both came from poor families. During the early 1850's there was a period where they (Jews who worked for the Russians) would kidnap Jewish boys to serve in the army. When Avraham Eli Rabionovitz was fourteen, the Jewish kidnappers came to his apartment and gave him to the Zarist authority to be sent with thousands of Jewish children to the army. They started on their long walk, and passed through Vishnevo to sleep overnight. When Reb Kopel and Reb Chaim Burkman found out about the Jewish boys' situation, they bribed the officers. The officers released a few boys, and among them was the young boy Avraham Eli. there he married the daughter of Yona -Yetza Rabinovitz and changed his last name to Rabinovitz.


Eilat Gordin Levitan eilatgordn@aol.com
USA -

In a message dated 12/29/00 7:39:52 AM Pacific Standard Time, joe_erber@hotmail.com writes:

Can You please tell me what You know about this person, Leib Davidson? My maternal Grandmother was Shoshe Rachel Davidson bas Mayer Zolmon Davidson.
Thanks



I will started with information from the Vishnevo Yizkor book about Moshe davidson;
"..…. Moshe Davidson, the grandfather of Yehudit (Abramson?) and of zev Davidson, who live with us here, (in Israel, written in 1970) our generation (born around 1900) knew him when he was around a hundred years old. on every Shabat he was still arranging a table and hosting a number of Chassidic admirers and followers from the neighboring towns, (Since Vishnevo was only 20 kilometers from Volozhin, a center for the "mitnagdim", there were just a few "Chassidim" in the area) .
The old man, as his Guests, were all "Slonim Chassids" (see ShtetLinks Page Slonim -http://www.zah.ndirect.co.uk/slonim.htm) For the "slonim chassids" in the area, Moshe Davidson was only second to the Rabbi in Slonim who lived too far for frequent pilgrimages, for that reason they gathered close to the shadow of Moshe Davidson to hear proud Chassidic tales and insights of Chassidic wisdom, and that sustained them and "quenched their thirst" and their deep desires to elevate their souls in the "Yard " of the Rabbi from Slonim…. "
in another refernce they wrote that his son, Ytzhak Davidson the Wagoneer, replaced him as the head of the "Chassids" A picture of Ytzhak Davidson; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/v_images/27_9vish_b.gif
in another refernce ".....There were a few bakeries in Vishnevo,you could find fresh bread in Ytzhak Davidson bakery, Ester Dudman bakery, Henyas' and Benyamin Ytzhak Dikenstein...."
now for Leib Davidson, I am sorry to say I found that name with his wife Nechama and the children, on the list of the perished Martyrs of Vishnevo.
The book was written in 1970, they give addresses of Vishnievans in Israel, for Davidsons: Yisrael Davidson, Hertzel street #2, Haifa, Israel
Zev Davidson, Sachna Darvish, 227 Street #48 , Yafo, Israel.
The only Yehudit I found was; Abramson Yehudit & Chanoch (brother of the book edditor) Rabenu Bechayayi Street #16 Bnay Brak.
Thank you , Eilat
if anyone else wants to know about their family from the book, please email me.
Eilat Gordin Levitan eilatgordn@aol.com


. Dear Eilat,

Thank you for writing to me about the Weisbords. My
aunt said her father, Isaac Weisberg, emigrated from
Volozhin around the turn of the century. I learned
from another relative that his original surname was
Weisbord. I would love to compare our data and see
what kind of connection there is. I probably won't
have time to collect my data until next week. And I
am sorry I couldn't get back to you until now; I am a
pathology resident and a father of a 2 year old girl.

I will try to get back to you next week. I look
forward to seeing a Volozhin page on your very
impressive website.

Sincerely,


Jeremy Ditelberg
USA -

Husband: Ike Isaac GELMAN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Born: 28 APR 1872 at: Wolozin, Vilna goberniya
Married: at: Poland
Died: 22 DEC 1944 at: Greenwood, Mississippi
Father:Moishe Morris GELMAN
Mother:Udasha UBERSTINE
Other Spouses:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Wife: Sophie Ruchel DAVIDSON
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Born: 4 NOV 1879 at: Vishniev, Lithuania
Died: 11 MAR 1951 at: Greenwood, Mississippi
Father:Mayer Solomon DAVIDSON
Mother:Etta Miriam


Family History Web Page Design Center smrogers@CousinsPlus.com
USA -

Reference to the vishnievo guestbook; The lady who mentioned
how the Jewish people died in 1942 in visnievo was more
horrible than what she says happened. The German killers
entered the Ghetto with trucks and when filled took the Jews
to the top of the street made them get into 3 or four buildinds, sprayed the buildings with gas and began shooting
with machine guns at the ones that tried to get out. The next day the non Jews of visnievo, bogdanowo ant others began tearing at the bodies which were almost glued together from the fire and were removing the gold teeth and
searched the bodies for other valuables.I don't want to go any further, but I was there when all this happened. Since
1992 I traveled to visnievo 5 times and visit the site. I have pictures of the monument. I keep going back to see if it really happened.

Then what about the Jewish cemetery? Or is it like it's no longer there. I wittnessed many Jewish men shot there and
burried in mass graves this should be restored. At present
it is covered with large trees, weeds and tall grass. I was there three years ago and it is still is the same. Anyone that
wants a picture of the hollocust site in visniewo just send me a e-mail to plastic6@JUNO.COM

Thanks for reading

Charles Straczynski
3150 Kennelworth Lane
Bonita,CA 91902
619-472-0490 fax 619-472-1040


Charles Straczynski plastic6@juno.com
Bonita, CA USA -

Reference to the vishnievo guestbook; The lady who mentioned
how the Jewish people died in 1942 in visnievo was more
horrible than what she says happened. The German killers
entered the Ghetto with trucks and when filled took the Jews
to the top of the street made them get into 3 or four buildinds, sprayed the buildings with gas and began shooting
with machine guns at the ones that tried to get out. The next day the non Jews of visnievo, bogdanowo ant others began tearing at the bodies which were almost glued together from the fire and were removing the gold teeth and
searched the bodies for other valuables.I don't want to go any further, but I was there when all this happened. Since
1992 I traveled to visnievo 5 times and visit the site. I have pictures of the monument. I keep going back to see if it really happened.

Then what about the Jewish cemetery? Or is it like it's no longer there. I wittnessed many Jewish men shot there and
burried in mass graves this should be restored. Right now
it is covered with large trees, weeds and tall grass. I was ther three years ago and it still is the same. Anyone that
wants a picture of the hollocust site in visniewo just send me a e-mail to plastic6@JUNO.COM

Thanks for reading

Charles Straczynski
3150 Kennelworth Lane
Bonita,CA 91902
619-472-0490 fax 619-472-1040


Charles Straczynski plastic6@juno.com
Bonita, CA USA -

Reference to the vishnievo guestbook; The lady who mentioned
how the Jewish people died in 1942 in visnievo was more
horrible than what she says happened. The German killers
entered the Ghetto with trucks and when filled took the Jews
to the top of the street made them get into 3 or four buildinds, sprayed the buildings with gas and began shooting
with machine guns at the ones that tried to get out. The next day the non Jews of visnievo, bogdanowo ant others began tearing at the bodies which were almost glued together from the fire and were removing the gold teeth and
searched the bodies for other valuables.I don't want to go any further, but I was there when all this happened. Since
1992 I traveled to visnievo 5 times and visit the site. I have pictures of the monument. I keep going back to see if it really happened.

Then what about the Jewish cemetery? Ot is like it's no longer there. I wittnessed many Jewish men shot there and
burried in mass graves this should be restored. Right now
it is covered with large trees, weeds and tall grass. I was ther three years ago and it still is the same. Anyone that
wants a picture of the hollocust site in visniewo just send me a e-mail to plastic6@JUNO.COM

Thanks for reading

Charles Straczynski
3150 Kennelworth Lane
Bonita,CA 91902
619-472-0490 fax 619-472-1040


Charles Straczynski plastic6@juno.com
Bonita, CA USA -

Reference to the vishnievo guestbook; The lady who mentioned
how the Jewish peple died in 1942 in visnievo was more
horrible than what she says happened. The German killers
entered the Ghetto with trucks and when filled to the Jews
to the top of the street made them get into 3 or four buildinds, sprayed the buildings with gas and began shooting
with machine guns at the ones that tried to get out. The next day the non Jews of visnievo, bogdanowo ant others began tearing at the bodies which were almost glued together from the fire and were removing the gold teeth and
searched the bodies for other valuables.I don't want to go any further, but I was there when all this happened. Since
1992 I traveled to visnievo 5 times and visit the site. I have pictures of the monument. I keep going back to see if it really happened.

Then what about the Jewish cemetery? Ot is like it's no longer there. I wittnessed many Jewish men shot there and
burried in mass graves this should be restored. Right now
it is covered with large trees, weeds and tall grass. I was ther three years ago and it still is the same. Anyone that
wants a picture of the hollocust site in visniewo just send me a e-mail to plastic6@JUNO.COM

Thanks for reading

Charles Straczynski
3150 Kennelworth Lane
Bonita,CA 91902
619-472-0490 fax 619-472-1040


Charles Straczynski plastic6@juno.com
Bonita, CA USA -

PODBERSKY in the U.S (A very common name in Vishnevo)
ESTHER PODBERSKY

  SSN 020-38-2205 Residence:
02150  Chelsea, Suffolk, MA
  Born 3 Aug 1904 Last Benefit:
  
  Died Jun 1984 Issued:
MA (1964)
year: 1950
File Number: 01852
Surname: PODBERSKY
First Name: ESTER
Middle Initial:
Sex: Female
Month of Birth:  
Day of Birth:  
Year of Birth: xxxYOB
Race: White
Hispanic Origin:
Age Units: Years
Age: 84
Month of Death: February
Day of Death: 23
Death State: Connecticut
Death County: New London
Death Town: Colchester
Birth State:  
Birth Town:  
Marital Status: Never Married
Decedent's Last Spouse:  
Education:  
State of Residence: Connecticut
County of Residence: New London
Town of Residence: Lebanon


ISADORE PODBERSKY   SSN 010-09-0752 Residence:
02151  Revere, Suffolk, MA
  Born 3 Aug 1896 Last Benefit:
  
  Died Dec 1968 Issued:
MA (Before 1951)

ROSE PODBERSKY   SSN 047-38-1974 Residence:
06226  Willimantic, Windham, CT
  Born 5 Jul 1908 Last Benefit:
  
  Died Jan 1981 Issued:
CT (1963)

WILLIAM PODBERSKY SSN 041-34-1610 Residence:
06226  Willimantic, Windham, CT
  Born 17 Jan 1905 Last Benefit:
  
  Died 2 Mar 1997 Issued:
CT (1959 And 1960)

Phone and Address Listings;
NOAH PODBERSKY 400 KINGS POINT DR   MIAMI FL 33160 4776 (305) 945-4435

Husband: Mike Podberski Father:    
    Mother:    
Wife: Alma Giannini Father:   Guiseppe Giannini
    Mother:   Rita UNKNOWN
Marriage Date:   Marriage Place:  
Children: MariaJo Podberski






Ancestry.families.aol.com http://www.ancestry.families.aol.com/main.htm
USA -

I INADVERTENTLY SUBMITTED THE FOLLOWING NOTE. IT SHOULD BE: Email correspondence with Diane Rabson
Shalom Diane,
I created a page for a shtetl near Vishnevo
www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/kurenets.html. I Hope I could do the same quality page for Vishnevo.
My address; Eilat Gordin Levitan
3895 Eureka Drive
Studio City, Ca 91604
My phone # (818) 506 4136.
I will be happy to post on this site any pictures of your family (old or new).
Eilat Gordin Levitan
USA -


Email corespendence with Diane Rabson
Shalom Diane,
I created a page for a shtetl near Vishnevo
www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/kurenets.html. I Hope I could do the same qulity page for Vishnevo.
I had a lot of help from the native kurenitzers in Israel.
For Vishnevo, my relatives from the Rogovin/ Alishkevitz family of Vishnevo are great help- however they (as I )
were born in Israel. could you tell me who helped you with the pictures titles from the Yizkor book of Vishnevo?
all the pages I am doing are posted on jewishgen. (Kurenets, Dolhinov, Vishnevo) I am also starting a page for Volozhin.
Thank you , Eilat
Eilat,
My great-grandmother was Rachel Persky of Volozhin! I have the yizkor book for Volozhin, which I bought in Israel. But no translation yet.
Nili Feingold of Boulder (an Israeli) translated most of the Vishnevo translation. She also did the photographs. Shimon Podberesky of Kibbutz Eilon helped Leonard Robbins with identification of some of the photographs in the book. Nili also translated the necrology--list of people who were murdered in the Holocaust.
Can you open attachments in Word '97? I can send the necrology on Monday or Tues. The photographs have been translated by hand. Where do you live?
Send me your postal address and I'll mail them. The translation is in Word '97 also--I have a little formatting to do, though.
By the way, I'm thinking seriously of studying Yiddish in Vilnius next summer. I will go to Belarus too and see Volozhin and Vishnevo; I'd like
to go for a walk in the Naliboka Forest. (And photograph--I'm a photographer).
Cheers,
Diane


My Address; 3895 Eureka Drive.





Eilat Gordin Levitan
Studio City, Ca USA -

My great-great grandparents were Joseph Benjamin Podberesky (b. 1840) and Libby-Duske Podberesky (b. 1840). They both lived and died in Vishnevo. They had five children: Frieda (b. 1859), Zev Wolfe (b. 1862), Chivya (b.?), Abraham (b.1871), and one other daughter, about whom very little is known. My great-grandfather was Abraham Podberesky. Abraham married my great-grandmother, Esther Davidson (b.1868), also a Vishnever. While stil in Vishnevo, Abraham and Esther Davidson Podberesky had two children, Leah (b.1893) and Rachel (b.1899) Podberesky. The family of four emigrated to the United States very near the turn of the century, probably between 1898 and 1902. Once in the United states, Abraham and Esther had three additional children: William (b.?), Annie (b.1906), and Bess (b.1908) Podberesky. Annie Podberesky was my grandmother.
I hope that this information is of interest to some of you visiting this site.
Sincerely,
Jessica Cooper
coopshaff@aol.com
Jessica Cooper coopshaff@aol.com
New York, NY USA -

Russo-Japanese War Town/Name Index
Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905

Database of Russian Army Jewish soldiersinjured, killed or missing in action Records Sorted by Province(Guberniya)-Town/Surname

Vilna Vishnevo Zusman
FAST Genealogy ServiceRussian-Japanese War of 1904-1905


Database of Russian Army Jewish soldiers injured, killed or missing in action Order Form(Please print, fill out and mail to:FAST Genealogy Service8510 Wild Olive Drive Potomac, MD 20854, USA)

Please translate and mail the following records:No(s): _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, _________The fee of US$ 18.00 for each record, total of US$ _____________ is enclosed.Please mail the records to:
Russo-Japanese War Town/Name Index
USA -

A passage from Jay Rabunskis' "Memoir of infancy in the Vileyka camp"
....The factory would produce root beer out of black bread and sugar, called Kvas. My Grandmother had soon joined in partnership with her brother, who was the father of Shimon Peres, the ex-prime minister of Israel. The maiden name of my grandmother was Perski. She had several brothers and sisters that were scattered all over the world. One of them was the father of Loren Becall. (Who used to be called Perski)....
You can read the rest of the very moving memoir at; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_menu.html

eilat
USA -

Wonderful site! I will send it to all my Rabinowitz
Relatives!! Happy Hanukkah!

Cliff Karchmer
Cliff Karchmer Rabinowitz@juno.com
Silver Spring, MD USA -

Date: Mon, 17 Nov 1997 14:42:34 U
Reply-To: Jay Paul
Sender: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group
From: Jay Paul
Subject: Which Vishnevo?
Comments: To: Multiple recipients of JewishGen
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"; Name="Message Body"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
SUBJECT: Which Vishnevo?

Dear JewishGenners,
I recently received a family history taken down by a distant cousin in
1962 from her grandparents, etc. Her grandfather (who was not directly
related to me), talked about coming from a small town, "Vishniva, Wilna,
Poland." Given that the story also involved her great-grandfather
studying to be a rabbi in "Volozen, Wilna, Poland" (and checking Shtetl
Seeker), and mention of living in Minsk, I figured out that Vishniva
probably is Vishnevo, Belarus (and Volozen is Valozhyn or Volozhin in
Belarus). However, the Shtetl Seeker lists 3 different Vishnevos:
5524 lat 2839 long N (112.2 miles NNE from Minsk),
5443 lat 2632 long N (70.1 miles NW from Minsk), and
5408 lat 2614 long N (56.4 miles WNW from Minsk).
How do I tell which is the likely contender? The only other information I
have is that Israel and Ida PODBERSKY, who lived there, had a winery.
They had two daughters (Rifka, and Rasha) and one son (Julius--who moved
to the USA in 1890, gave up his rabbinical career to open a deli in the
Lower East Side, and who changed his family name to BERMAN). Julius was
married to Faygel PERSKY from Volozhin, had 4 children (Michael, Raye,
Charles, and Max), all of whom came to the USA. Max then married the
daugh ter of my great-uncle Harry LEVITSKY in Brooklyn, NY.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

Jay Paul (jay_paul@quickmail.ucsf.edu)


-=-


Jay Paul
USA -

Date: Sat, 22 Nov 1997 14:53:39 -0500
Reply-To:
Sender: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group
From: JimYarin
Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com
Subject: Re: Which Vishnevo?
Comments: To: Multiple recipients of JewishGen
Jay Paul writes:

However, the Shtetl Seeker lists 3 different Vishnevos:
5524 lat 2839 long N (112.2 miles NNE from Minsk),
5443 lat 2632 long N (70.1 miles NW from Minsk), and
5408 lat 2614 long N (56.4 miles WNW from Minsk).
How do I tell which is the likely contender?

The Shtetl Seeker is an amazing database with search engine, but it includes a
huge number of the tiniest municipalities. Our ancestors would not very likely
list on a document the name of their little tiny village (though this does
sometimes happen). So your objective is to determine which of the above towns
had any sizeable Jewish population. The best source for this is Where Once We
Walked (WOWW) By Mokotoff and Amdur Sacks. Also useful, but to a lesser degree
(it lists much fewer places, but they are the much larger Jewish towns) is the
Shtetl Finder Gazateer by Chester Cohen.

Jim Yarin
JimYarin@aol.com

Reasearching EF(F)RON, AFFRON and (Jewish) HEFFRON and variants of all
locations; SILVERBROOK and YESHIVABUCHER anywhere; YARIN anywhere; the town of
Amdur in Grodno Gubernia.
JimYarin@aol.com
Somerville, MA




JimYarin jimyarin@aol.com
USA -

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 18:50:33 EST
From: DBH12345@aol.com
Subject: Oshmiany District Records Being Processed
Dear Belarus SIG:

The Oshmiany Research Group of the LitvakSIG has already acquired and
partially translated 1858 Revision List records for the Oshmiany District. In
the mid 19th Century Oshmiany was one of the four districts that were part of
Vilna Guberniya, that later became part of Belarus, and their records were
accessible at the Vilnius State Historical Archives. Most of the expenses for
the purchase and translation of these records have been covered by this group,
but more help is needed. The data is going to be part of a mid-19th Century
census of Lithuania based primarily on revision and family lists, supplemented
by other kinds of genealogical records. The LitvakSIG is a JewishGen hosted
SIG and the "All Lithuania" Database will be accessible to everyone.

Discussions are underway for joint sponsorship by Belarus SIG and the
LitvakSIG of research groups for Disna, Lida, and Vileika uyezds in which the
data will be accessible thru both the LitvakSIG's "All Lithuania" database and
a similar database for the Belarus SIG.

The towns of Oshmiany Uyzed include:

1) Oshmiany, 2)Nalibokoye(Nalibotz),3) Vishnevo, 4) Volozhin, 5) Dereviany,
6) Devenishki, 7) Zhuprany, 8) Zaskeviche, 9) Ivoye, 10) Krevo, 11) Lipnishki,
12) Solsk, 13) Smorgon, 14) Traby, 15) Golshany.

Revision Lists are among the most important and valuable genealogical
documents we can obtain. They list every member of the Jewish community, on a
shtetl by shtetl basis within each household. These census's were made for
purposes of taxation and conscription and clearly show all of the people who
resided in a household: the head of household, father's name age and all the
relationships between members of a family, Additional data is provided, noting
any change in status of a personal which had taken place since the last
revision, eight years before. And since additional notes were made for a
number of years after 1858 on the same Revision List, we have a lot of
information about what happened to people over a period of 10 or 12 years (and
sometimes more). These notes include information about death, conscription,
moving away (and sometimes where to) and various court actions, all with
dates.

Separate lists were kept for workers, merchants, craftsmen and artisans (in
some cases) and notes are added when this status changed.

Because our ancestors moved around a lot, to marry, to be educated, find
jobs, to trade - looking at an entire district instead of a single town is
valuable.
You can also track women who married and were thereafter listed under their
husband's or husband's father's household, and also note men who married into
a family and for some reason chose to take the bride's surname. So with
Revision Lists for uyezds we can discover many more ancestors, and learn more
about them than would otherwise be possible in any other way. You will almost
certainly be able to find ancestors in several different shtetls within the
district.

If you are interested in joining this research group and helping complete the
project, please contact one of the three Oshmiany coordinators. With your
help the remaining records can be translated and will be available on the
Internet very quickly.

David Hoffman & Davida Noyek Handler
Co-Coordinators, LitvakSIG

Eric Goldstein
Research Group Coordinator

Please contact:

Samuel A. Arutt
Cliff Karchmer,
Joanne Saltman

Oshmiany Research Group Co-Coordinators

MODERATOR'S NOTE: I would like to thank David Hoffman, Davida Handler, and
Eric Goldstein for posting this most informative message. Because of the
changing borders in eastern Europe, many of the SIGS have overlapping
geographic areas of interest. As a result, it is in the best interests of
everyone that the SIGs cooperate in research efforts that benefit their
fellow researchers. I will be working with the Litvak SIG in efforts to
share information and include data from overlapping areas in both the All
Litvak Database (ALD) and the All Belarus Database (ABD).

The current issue of AVOTAYNU (Vol. CIV, No.3, Fall 1998) has an excellent
article by Boris Feldyblyum title, "Russian Revision Lists: A History".
This is must reading for anyone researching Belarus or any other areas
that were once part of the Russian Empire.


fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator




David Fox fox@erols.com
USA -

Date: Tue, 13 Oct 98 01:40:34 +0300
From: "East European Jewish Heritage Project"
Subject: Volozhyn Yeshiva
As Oleg Perzashkevich mentions, the Union of Religious Jewish
Congregations of the Republic of Belarus is about to take title
to the Volozhyn Yeshiva. The East European Jewish Heiritage
Project, a registered charity based in London and Minsk, has
worked with the Union and negotiated the arrangement. It is the
hope of the Union and ourselves that we will complete the
restoration of Yeshiva and its conversion into a Jewish
Research and Cultural Resource Centre by 2003, the two
hundredth anniversary of the Yeshiva's construction. One of the
functions of the Yeshiva will be to serve as a repository for
the many scattered recods of pre-War Jewish life now held in
private hands.

The project has been endorsed by, amongst others, Shimon Peres,
whose ancestors are from the nearby village of Vishnevo. If
anyone would like further details or is interested in assisting
and/or supporting this project you may either contact the Union
by fax at the numbers given by Oleg or the EEJHP by e-mail at
. I'll be glad to post photos and other
info.. Anyone who would like to participate in the design phase
would be most welcome.

Regards,

Frank Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project

East European Jewish Heritage Project root@eejhp.open.by
USA -

Date: Tue, 08 Aug 2000 11:00:10 EDT
From: ane@aoHJKl.com
Subject: Vishnevo and Oshmiany uyezd vital records
Although I was aware that the shtetl Vishnevo, and the Oshmiany uyezd, are now located in Belarus, I was surpised when I received a negative response to my request for Vishnevo vital record copies and translations from the Lithuanian State Historical Archives in Vilnius. The Archives does acknowledge that Vishnevo and the Oshmiany district were located in the pre-WWI Vilna gubernia. However, they state that their archive has not received any vital records for Vishnevo Jews. They suggest searching the Belarus archives.

Harold J. Heyman
Northbrook, IL
Searching: HEYMAN, GEYMAN from Vishnevo

MODERATOR'S NOTE: As part of efforts by Litvak SIG's Oshmiany District Research Group, listings from Vishnevo from the 1858 revision list (census) are searchable in the All-Lithuania Database. In some cases in which vital records did not survive, other records, such as revision lists, can provide significant genealogical information.




Harold J. Heyman ane@aoHJKl.com
USA -

from jewishgen Date: Thu, 30 Dec 1999 08:48:30 -0500
From: Clifford L Karchmer
Subject: Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian ... and French??
Recently our family, which has traced its roots to Lithuania and Belarus,
found new information on our great great great grandfather, Nathan
RABINOWITZ. From an old family letter, we learned that he was literate
in the core languages of Hebrew and Yiddish, as well as Russian and
French. The inclusion of French really puzzled us, as it would seem to
have no relation to shtetl life in that part of Eastern Europe.

Nathan was in the flour milling business and, we believe, also in flax
production, in the Dievenishkes-Oshmiany and possibly Vilna areas. But
what would that have to do with fluency in French?

We thought this might be a clue to where the family came from--but we
have no idea of family origins earlier than 1660 in Vishneva, Belarus.
Some family members believe we had Sephardic origins but there is no real
evidence of that, and even if so, why would anyone be French-speaking?

So, does anyone have an explanation--or even a reasonable theory-- to our
"French" question.

Many thanks,

Cliff Karchmer

Researching: KARCHMER, RABINOWITZ, MILNER, BLOCH, BLOCKMAN, LEVIN, and
DAVIDSON, from: Vishneva, Dievenishkes, Oshmiany, Lida, Lipnishkes, Voronova, Alytus, Olkenik, and Sventsyon


Cliff Karchmer rabinowitz@juno.com
USA -

Date: Thu, 9 Sep 1999 13:54:23 -0400
From: Clifford L Karchmer
Subject: Ostrowiec/Ostrowitz/Ostrovits/Astravets
I am trying to obtain records of family members who lived in Ostrovits,
also spelled Ostrowitz and Ostrowiec; a town about 15 miles NNW of
Oshmiany.

Does anyone know the Guberniya and Uezd in which it is located?

Has any Uezd study group obtained revision or other records for that
town; if so, are they translated?

Thanks,

Cliff Karchmer

Researching: KARCHMER, DAVIDSON, MILNER, AND RABINOWITZ, from
VISHNEVA, DEVENISHKES, LIPNISHKES, OSHMIANY, ALYTUS,
LIDA, AND VORONOVA


Cliff Karchmer rabinowitz@juno.com
USA -

Yehoshua Rabinowitz was born in Vishnevo.He was the seventh mayor of Tel Aviv-
Mayors of Tel Aviv
Meir Dizengoff 1921—1925
David Bloch 1925—1927
Meir Dizengoff 1928—1936
Israel Rokach 1936—1952
Chaim Levanon 1953—1959
Mordechai Namir 1959—1969
Yehoshua Rabinowitz 1969—1974
Shlomo Lahat 1974—1993
Ronnie Milo 1993—1998
Ron Huldai 1998
Beit Halochem, Tel Aviv opened its doors in 1974, after the Yom Kippur War. It was built on seven acres of land allocated to the Zahal Disabled Veterans Organization by the late Yehoshua Rabinovitz, then mayor of Tel Aviv. The principal contribution for the Center was provided by the Aktionskomitee "Pro-Israel" of Switzerland.


Yehoshua Rabinowitz Foundation for the Arts

D. Rubin
Israel -

The Yizkor Book Database
Searching for Town VISHNEVO
Number of Books: 1
Run on Sunday 10 December 2000 at 09:52:13

Vishnevo, Belarus
Original Title: Vishneva, ke-fi she-hayeta ve-enena od; sefer zikaron
English Title: Wiszniew; as it was and is no more; memorial book
Editor: Hayyim Abramson
Published: Tel Aviv 1972
Publisher: Wiszniew Society in Israel
Volumes: 1 Pages: 216 Languages: H,Y

Contacts
Name: Diane Rabson, rabson@ncar.ucar.edu
Address: 450 S. 41st St.
City: Boulder, CO 80303
Has book? Yes
Translation: As of 1/22/97, 71 pages have been translated, including numerous pages of photographs, as well as an appendix of Holocaust victims. Hopes to get remainder translated but it is quite expensive
Notes: Diane Rabson wrote: I'm writing a book about my great-grandfather, Moshe Yehoshua Rabinovich, who emigrated from Vishenovo in the early 1900s.

Name: Leonard Robbins, LRROBBINS@aol.com
Address: P.O. Box 838
City: Cleveland, TX 77328-0838
Has book? Yes
Translation: Working with Diane Rabson (see entry) to get book translated.
Notes:

Name: Joseph Rubinstein, rubinstein@coker.edu
Address: 114 East Home Ave.
City: Hartsville, SC 29550
Has book? Yes
Translation: none
Notes:
Libraries
Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel, Call No: D47(438)
Ahad Haam Library, Tel Aviv, Israel, Call No: 933.5(438) 142
Hebrew Union College, Los Angeles, CA, Call No: DS 135 R9.3 V5.98
UCLA Research Library, Los Angeles, CA, Call No: DS 135 R93 V755v
Holocaust Center of Northern California, San Francisco, CA, Call No: wisniwa
Price Library of Judaica, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Call No: Has book
Boston Public Library, Boston, MA, Call No: DS135.R93 V598
Harvard University Library, Cambridge, MA, Call No: 16718.346
Brandeis University Library, Waltham, MA, Call No: DS135.R93 V598
Jewish Theological Seminary Library, New York, NY, Call No: DS135 R93 V598 V5
New York Public Library, Jewish Division, New York, NY, Call No: *PXV(Vishnevo) 75-1443
Yeshiva University Library, New York, NY, Call No: DS135 R93 V598
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research Library, New York, NY, Call No: 9/77893
Congregation Neveh Shalom, Portland, OR, Call No: has book






JewishGen
USA -

Metric books of the Catholic churches
Oshmyany deanery Minsk province
National Historical Archives of Belarus in Minsk

Parish/Church Years Fond/Inventory Number of items

Bogdanov 1919-1922, 1942-1950 1781 /49 1
Derevnoye 1885-1920 1781 /49 12
Naliboki 1901-1912 1781 /49 1
Oborkovo 1885-1916 1781 /49 3
Vishnevo 1901-1915 1781 /49 14
Volozhin 1930-1938 1781 /49 1
Zaberezhye 1901-1915 1781 /49 13

eilat
USA -

Growing Up In White Russia
My memories of Belakoritz and Wolozyn (right next to Vishnevo) 1912-1931
By Cheyna Rogovin Chertow

This charming account of Jewish life in a shtetl in Europe was given to Laurel Chertow Glickstein by her mother, Cheyna Rogovin Chertow, in Chicago, Illinois, December 1997.
Background


A family wedding early June, 1931, in Wolozyn.
Zelik - Nachama - Abe Chertow (my dad) - Cheyna (my mom) - Aaron - Rifka
Front Row: Parents: Hinde and Moshe Rogovin.

My father Moshe Rogovin lived in Belakoritz, Poland (Belarus) with my mother Hinde (nee Mordochowitz) and they had 5 children: Nachama (1910), Cheyna (1912), Aaron (1914) , Rifka (1919), Zelik(1923). He worked for a Forestry Office, Agarkov and Heller, with headquarters in Paris, France. He worked in Belakoritz until about 1928. My family moved to Wolozyn [this variant spelling of Valozhin is used throughout by the author - Ed.] in 1925. In 1928, my father was transferred to the company headquarters in Mikeshevitch. We continued to live in Wolozyn. Although the towns my father worked in were not physically so far away by today's standards, it was difficult to commute and my father often was not home for weeks and months at a time. The company marked and cut trees to make veneer. He worked there before World War 1 and once the war ended, he was rehired.

The Town of Belakoritz
Belakoritz was a beautiful town, a resort town in White Russia - it had moving water, beautiful trees: white bark trees. We lived in a nice house. The people were White Russian. Later, Belakoritz became Polish, in about 1925. I rode bare back in Belakoritz, with a Gentile friend who had horses: her name was Zena. The Gentiles at that time were good to our family. But Jews were never able to hold government jobs. As time passed, Gentiles, or "the Goyim" became difficult to trust. There was a Polish School. We went to the Polish school in Belakoritz. There was no Hebrew School. There were no other Jewish people living in Belakoritz. We had a rabbi come to our house and stay with us for the week. He would sleep there and go back to Wolozyn on the weekends. My father was home with us at this time.

Living Conditions
The house was wooden that my father rented from the Polish Government. There was a well outside the house. That is where we kept food from spoiling. My mother would go to the market on Thursdays to Wolozyn. either walked 1 1/2 hours or went by horse and buggy. She bought needed items and meat. She koshered the meat at home. It was wrapped in a pot with a white cloth; covered with oilcloth and tied with a rope to lower into the well. It would sit on top of the cold water and stay fresh. Next day it was taken out for cooking for Shabbos. We used Kerosene lamps in the house. The kitchen (kich) had a brick oven with a steel door; logs were used to heat the oven. The oven had a separate section on the side with a trifoos on three feet that looked like a tripod about a 10 inch high circular platform and we would put twigs on the bottom, make a fire and put the steel pot on top of the trifoos to heat the water for bathing. It was also used to make jelly; fried chicken fats; feinkochen scrambled eggs; boil eggs - a very handy little compartment.

For washing clothes, we would boil water in a couple pots with brown soap; there were clothes lines outside. In the winter, we dried clothes outside to kill lice and to keep the clothes sanitary. Also we went to the river to wash clothes during the warmer months. We used a board and hammer to pound the clothes clean. The bathroom (toilet) was outside against the wall of the house - we then covered the waste with dirt. In the kitchen - only for use in the night - we "voided" in a pot and then emptied the contents outside in the morning.

We had a piece of land which my mother would cover with the waste products including all left over food (very little) for fertilizer. We grew potatoes, pickles, radishes, onions, and had a barn with chickens and a milking cow. I drank raw warm milk fresh from the cow which we milked ourselves. Our chickens were taken to Wolozyn for slaughter.

Keeping Time
In Belakoritz we looked on the sun. My father had a pocket watch: "Arum 12:00 mit tog tseit" and "vetchere dinner arum zeks azeger". A calendar in Belakoritz? I don't recall; but we knew when the holidays came and we knew when it was shabbos. We lived close to Wolozyn and they had wind up clocks and calendars in Wolozyn.

Life at Home
We made black bread in the house; my father would put in his pocket two sandwiches with butter and with herring and a fresh pickle ("the best") he would go to work . We always had a feshl (barrel) of herring. We also bought white bread from the bakery in Wolozyn. We always had good food.

All births took place in the home with a local midwife: a woman who lived on a nearby farm. Her name was Theresa, a Russian, who birthed all the babies in the town. The father or older sibling had to walk to her house when mother was in labor and the midwife stayed with the family until after the birth. The birth of my youngest brother, Zelik, took place in the house. The brit was done by the mohel from Wolozyn. There was a minyon that came from Wolozyn and my mother made a veal breast, roasted potatoes, and a samavar with tea and sponge cake (tort) with lekach (honey cake). The brit was called a mitzvah and there was never a charge. The Mohel would place sugar with gauze - wet in water in the child's mouth, like a pacifier.

Babies were nursed for a long time. The newborn was kept in a vigele (a rocking bed). The newborn was wrapped in a vikelach. (like a bandage wrapping) going around and around and wrapped with a different cloth in the center as a diaper. The vikelach began at the shoulders and ended at the toes closed. And the feet were wrapped so to prevent the "fees fun vaksn krum" (feet from growing crooked). This was worn for about four months, from shoulders to feet. By four months the infant's body above the waist was freed. The vikelach was still used from the waist down till about 6 months of age. The infant was bathed daily in water that was heated in a big steel pot. The steel pot was heated on the trifoos..

My parents slept in two twin beds, on a perena, covering themselves with a coldre. The second bedroom, a camara, is where the children slept. There were beds, feather pillows, a perena or a feather quilt. When my father was not home, my older sister would sleep in their bedroom with my mother. Otherwise the girls slept in one room. A couch called a divon is where Aaron and Zelik slept outside the second bedroom.

We made clothes by hand. Peasants made linens using a hand web unit. Women on the farms would spin thread by hand. The local midwife was also a peasant.

The Town of Wolozyn
We moved to Wolozyn in about 1925, my father's birthplace. It was getting difficult for Jews to live in Belakoritz. No shuls. Children needed the Hebrew School and the Jewish life. My father moved his family, although he continued to work in Belakoritz. The distance was about 1 hour's walk. The house in Wolozyn was rented and in about 1932 my father built a new house and moved into that one. I left Wolozyn in 1931 and never saw the new house. Many of the features of the house were similar to the one in Belakoritz. Our house in Belakoritz was a dorf - really a small farm. We were more self-sufficient there; and it was very beautiful in Belakoritz. We now lived in a town that had a market to shop and buy food and utensils for daily use in the home. Thursday was the big market day.

The Jewish people lived in a circular fashion around the market place. The gentiles lived further from the market. Now we lived in a town that had three shuls; a bathhouse for washing that also served as a mikva. The tukerke - nail cutter, cleaner, cared for the women in the mikva and this is where much gossip in town began and spread, all in the hands of one woman. She knew who did and did not go to the mikva, and that was a most important ritual for all Jewish married women. There was NEVER a dream of intermarriage. NEVER. For both the Jews as well as the Gentiles. NEVER.

The house was wooden; the toilet was outside - an outhouse that was cleaned regularly by a townsperson in charge of sanitation. That was an improvement to the sanitary conditions in Belakoritz. Although conditions in Belakoritz were more primitive, we never became ill due to any disease related to sanitation. Electricity in the house: I recall two bulbs, one in the kitchen (kich), one in the living room (stalova). We had a calendar on the wall and also had a wind-up clock. The houses were lined up next to each other. The kitchen (kich) had a brick oven; used logs to heat the oven; steel door. We bought meat the same day we cooked. All meat was koshered at home. The roof of the oven was made of a flat platform and in the winter this would serve as a place to sleep in the cold winter months: "shlofn afn aven". Men would sleep up there - it was made so you could step up and get on the platform with a pillow and blanket and go to sleep.

There was one family - I remember visiting a friend, Freidel, and her father always slept on the platform all winter. He was "Shimon the bord" (the Beard). Mother thinks he never slept in a bed! A handsome man known as the man having the longest beard in Wolozyn.

The outside well water was used for drinking, bathing, and washing clothes. A pail hung from the well; we lowered the pail, pulled out the water. Wolozyn had three wells in the whole town. Go to the well or get water delivered by horse and wagon.

The dining room, living room - stalova - had an oven made out of tile to heat the house, called "petz-er-ke" (tile fireplace). It had a steel door and we put wood (logs) in to heat the house. The tile oven went up to the ceiling like a fireplace. Feter Hirshl Leib came and slept there - up against the wall. It was very warm all winter. Furniture and utensils in the house: a long bench and table in the dining room (stalova). We used clay pots with wires; made a cholnt in a clay pot; also used porcelain and copper pots. Dishes were porcelain and we used metal spoons and forks.

Transportation was by horse and buggy/sled. Money was counted in Zlotes. 1 Zlote = .18c. 8 Zlotes = One American Dollar. 100 Groshen = 1 Zlote. You could buy 40 lbs. of flour for 1 Zlote.

Wolozyn had a dry good store and an "opteka", which was a drugstore that carried ready-made herbs. The town was involved in the lumber business. There was a local orchard, a market place and a flour mill. The Bank was there for alvoyas, to borrow money and for nedovas (donations) to help people. The Teichel was the little river.

Familiar Names in Wolozyn
Shrira had a drugstore. Polak had a flour mill - they had an oriental carpet in their house. Rappaport had a lumber business. The Potashniks were educators and Hebrew teachers. The Rogovins were in the shoe business - shoemakers. Young Chaim and Yossl (stepbrothers) Rogovin the schuster (shoemaker). Chaim Rogovin the schneider was the tailor, an older man. He made suits for my father. Chaim Rogovin the katzif (butcher) died in the orchard from a heart attack. His son Aaron Rogovin took his place. There was Chaim the balagolla (taxi driver); Berman the Izengeshaft (hardware store); Hirshl the baker - his egg bagels were outstanding and so was his white bread; Rachel Leah Skloot the schneiderke - a superb dressmaker; Avrom Tsart the feltcher (doctor or healer). Marozhina sold ice cream in an ice cream store.

Yard goods were sold everyday but market day was on Thursday and Channa Skloot (Itzhak Sklootís daughter, my cousin) would sell yard goods. She moved to Palestine before the war in about 1935. The Perskys were in the "flox" linen business. They picked the plant called flox. The plant was about 3 feet tall, pulled the fibers out, crushed the fibers and through the machine, and the flox was made into fine linen. They also bought pig's hair and had grocery stores in town selling food items including farina, barley, lima beans and candy.

Food
People ate teiglach, cholnt, fish bulba, lekach (honey cake), gefilte fish, kneidlach, challah, potatoes, milk, butter, hard cheese, meat. For breakfast we might eat herring with green pickles (oogarot) with schvatze breit (pumpernickle bread); for lunch mitten tog a gebachte bulbe (baked potato) with sour cream (shmetene); for dinner, mittog vechere, we ate kelbene fleish (veal) mit pelgroipn (barley). Shabbos was a holy day and the whole town prepared, beginning on Thursday.

Visiting My Feter Hillel
Feter Hillel Skloot, my uncle - my father Moshe's mother's brother (grandmother's brother) - lived in Wolozyn. He was an older man. He lived with his wife. Every Thursday, I helped Feter Hillel in the market to sell pottery. I had a wonderful time with Feter Hillel. I also spent Fridays there helping them prepare for shabbos. I washed the floors, cleaned the kitchen and helped prepare the food. I would sometimes sleep there. His two sons (my cousins) sailed for America maybe in 1920. and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. I remember mail sent from America with packages and matzo for Pesach: Manischewitz Matzo. They were in the shoe business in Cleveland.

Blessings
The goyim would often come to the rabbi for a blessing. They would bring a chicken, a few zlotes to heal and the rabbi would offer them a prayer.

Holidays

Rosh Hashanah: All shuls were packed. First we went to the Wolozyner Teichl; tashlich.
Yom Kippur: Holiest day of the year. Everyone fasted as well as young children. Used to make the samavar (tea) with gebrite milk and herring to break the fast.
Sukkos: most had little attached porches on the houses and put a srach (evergreens) as a roof. They would bring an esrog and lulov and benched esrog.
Simchas Torah - at the Wolozyn yeshiva - all were celebrating inside the yeshiva for the day.
Hanukkah: Potato latkes with benching licht for eight days - but no big ceremony.
Purim: Before Pesach - made own hamentashen and sent shelachmonos (baked goods) to each other. Money went to a nedova.
Pesach: Made our own matzo and made matzo meal with a "hiltzen shtessl". The shtessl was very wide at the bottom and was placed in a large cuplike bowl and the matzo was ground up by hand till it became a fine flour.
Counting Shrira for 40 days until Shvuos - there were no marriages.
On the day of Shvuos we ate only milches (dairy): blintzes and fish.

The Shuls and Schools
There were schools: a Polish school and Hebrew school. There was a yeshiva, two churches and three shuls: the Aruptsu shul downhill, the Kleizel shul on the Uphill of Vilna Gass; and the Marketa Aruftsu shul on the Upperhill. We went to the Polish school and the Hebrew school. For barmitzvah the father just took his son to the shul, He read the Haftorah, and went home - no parties.

Other Points of Interest
There was a bathhouse, shvitz and a mikvah. There was a hospital and many babies were born in the hospital. There were few telephones and they were in wealthy homes in the South of Poland.

My father Moshe Rogovin was the baltfila in both the Aruptsu and Aruftsu shul. My grandfather was in the Kleizel shul years before. My father was born and raised in Wolozyn. He spent his early years with his father in the Kleizel shul. My mother Hinde comes from Derevna. The marriage was arranged.

Postscript
(Laurel Chertow Glickstein has appended the following notes}

Cheyna, my mother (b. 1912) married my father Abe (b. 1906) on about June 1, 1931 in Wolozyn, Poland. My father is an American who returned to Eastern Europe to seek out his roots. His parents arrived in America, September 1906, from Minsk, Russia. They settled in Chicago and there my father was born three months later. It was on my father's journey through his search in Eastern Europe for his relatives in Wolozyn that he met my mother. They were married on a Friday afternoon before Shabbos, which was the Shabbos noch Shvuos. The Shammos carried all the invitations for 5 zlotes. and delivered to all the Jewish houses. The whole town was invited to the wedding. There was a street procession to the wedding chupah, to the outside of the Aruptsika Shul. The reason for the large celebration was that an American man married a girl from Wolozyn, and in the history of the shtetl he was the first American to marry a local girl. The whole shtetl celebrated. The rabbi that married my parents was Rabbi Derechinsky. He honored them with Chupa Kedusha. There were many honorable guests at the wedding. Noteworthy rabbis from the Etz Chaim Yeshiva of Wolozyn were in attendance. The roof of the chupah consisted of tallesim held up by four poles carried by four ushers. The Rabbi asked for $10.00 and my father paid him $5.00 American money! The next morning my father had an uffroof and my grandfather Moshe Rogovin. was the baltefila, davening by the omed for the shabat service in the Aruptsika Shul.

The newlyweds remained with my mother's parents (grandparents) for about two months in preparation for leaving Poland to America. My mother sailed from Gdansk, Poland and arrived in New York on September 12, 1931. The cost of that passage was $140.00. My father arrived separately about a month later, sailing from London, England. They were unable to leave together because the Polish Government required that a Polish Citizen sail directly to America from their port. They then joined again together in Chicago, Illinois in early October 1931. Today, December 27, 1997, our family is celebrating my father's 91st birthday. We are four children, with 10 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren with the fourth due in June 1998.

As an addendum and current update (January 1999), my parents are still managing together in their home in Chicago. Our fourth great-grandchild was born June 23, 1998 and carries the beloved name of my Uncle Aaron Rogovin who was also a Resistance Fighter during the Holocaust. We are also expecting another grandchild, May 1999.



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Copyright © 1999 Belarus SIG and Laurel Chertow Glickstein

Belarus SIG and Laurel Chertow Glickstein
USA -

For the first part look at the Belarus SIG digest Archives.

When you read laws and regulations regarding Jews in the Russian
Empire, consider the time and the place. There was no religious
and cultural tolerance on a modern scale between Christians and
Jews in society. There was almost no common ground between their
cultures, but only business relations that were a vital necessity.
Most Jewish teenagers, even in the mid nineteenth century, didn't
speak or understand well the Russian language.
It was almost impossible at that time (1804), in practice, to go
to a Russian school and remain a Jew. Only in 1854 did the first
schools open in the Russian Empire (Minsk and Vilno) that were
specially for Jewish children in that they taught some secular
subjects along with traditional Jewish education. Therefore,
although the part of the laws about education for Jews in Russian
institutions seemed beneficial, from a Jewish point of view this
gave no real advantage but was another attempt at culturally and
educationally assimilating the Jews.

Now back to the document.

Regulations for Jews (translator's notes in parentheses):

I. About enlightenment.

1. All Jewish children may be accepted and taught, without any
differences from other children, in all Russian public (elementary)
schools, gymnasiums (high school) and universities.

2. Jewish children, while attending school, cannot be diverted
from their religion under any circumstances, cannot be forced to
learn that which is adverse to their religion and even could
contradict their religion.

3. Jewish children attending parochial or uyezd (district) schools,
may wear Jewish dress, but those attending gymnasiums must wear
German or Polish [style] dress for the purpose of uniformity.

4. Jewish children will be accepted to St. Peterburg Academy of
Arts if they show talent and inclination. Then they must wear
German dress.

5. Those Jews who, by their ability, reach certain levels of
achievement in universities in Medicine, Surgery, Physics,
Mathematics and other fields, will be acknowledged and promoted
to university degrees on a level with all other Russian subjects.

6. In the case of Jews who, despite all these motivations, refuse
to send their children to common public schools, then there will be
established at their expense special schools for their children to
study, and necessary tax must be determined through government
consideration.(Taxes will be collected from Jews to create public
Jewish schools under government control.) Among the subjects taught
must be one of these languages: Russian, Polish or German.

7. After six years have expired since the publication of this
regulation, all bookkeeping and other merchant's documentation and
correspondence between Jews must be written in one of these languages:
Russian, Polish or German, or contain a translation on one side [of
the page].

8. All Jews who reside in the Russian Empire have the right to
use their language in all matters related to their faith and in
everyday life. They must, beginning January 1, 1807, use Russian,
Polish or German languages in all public documents, deeds, bills
of exchange, bonds, obligations, etc. Without this, no any
documents will be accepted.

9. From the time of [publishing] this regulation, anyone who
would like to be elected as a Member of Town Council from among
the Jews in the gubernias incorporated from Poland, for general
order and uniformity must wear Russian or Polish dress if they
do not like to wear German dress. In the Russian gubernias, where
Jews are permitted to live, in case of election to Town Council,
Jews must wear German dress. Beginning in 1808, no Jew will be
elected as a Member of Town Council who cannot read and write in
one of these languages: Russian, German or Polish.

10. From the beginning of the year 1812, nobody can be elected or
appointed to any position in Kahal or the Rabbinate without being
literate in one of these designated languages.

With appreciation to Laura Benjaminson for her help.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL

---
To post to the Belarus SIG discussion group, send your message to:




Belarus SIG jewishgen
USA -

thanks for helping maintain the memory of vishnevo and the jews who lived there.
sam podberesky
USA -

Vishnevo (in Belarussian - Vishneva) - today a village in Valozhin region (22 km from Valozhin), Minsk area. 470 inhabitants (1992).
This place is known since the 14th century as a part of Krevo Duchy, since 15th - as a posession of famous belarussian and polish magnats family - Slushka, Ostikavich, Sangushka and Patz. In the second part of 16th century Vishneva is a center of gmina in Ashmiany povet, Vilna voevodstvo. The "golden age" of Vishnevo began in 1600. This year, Vishnevo were bought by famous belarussian magnat - A. Chraptovich.
In the second part of 18th century Vishneva is one of the most famous small towns in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Rech Pospolitaya (which united the Grand Duchy and Polish Kingdom). This time, Ioachim Chraptovich, deputy of RP Sejm from Navagrudak voevodstvo, philosopher and writer, who liberated his peasants in 1783, who took part in Kastiushka insurrecion, was an owner of Vishnevo.
Jews lived in Vishneva since the first part of 18th century. Chraptovich allowed them to buy a small plots of lands for the building theit settlements. Soon after this the central part with the market of Vishneva became jewish. Also, of course, Vishneva Jewry built their own new synagogue.
The main jewish businesses in Vishneva were the commerce and handicraft.
Since 1795 - Vishnevo is a part of Russian Empire, part of Ashmyany uezd and Vilna Gubernia. 2192 jews were in Ashamyany uezd in 1797.
The geographical position of Vishneva on the central road to Valozhin, Ashmiany and Kreva is very conviniet for any kinds of trade.Of course, jews used this position for their own business.
1812 was tragical for Vishneva. Napoleon troops invaded to Russia. Russian army retreated. Russian army of M.B. Barklay de Tolli took a battle near the Vishneva. After this Napoleon`s troops burnt former Chraptovich posession.
After the war Jews and other inhabitants began to reconstruct Vishneva.
And here the results of their work: the second part of 19th century - Vishneva is one of the belarussian industrial centers: the first belarussian foundry plant, alcohol plant, water mill, a leather plant (1866, N.Kaplan),
matches plant (1886, G. Lewin), "Electra" plant (1908, N. Romm) of the swedish matches.
In the end of 19th - the beginnig of 20th century Vishneva jews also were known as a handicraftsman, the owners of small beer, wool, butter, bread plants. Jews took an active part in Vishneva trade with Vilna, Navagrudak, Minsk ant others, in big fairs (2-3 per year) in this shtetl.
The jewish population of Vishneva in 1847 were 336 people. The results of famous Russian Empire census (1897) for Vishneva: 2650 inhabitants - 1465 jews. Vishneva Jewry had a heder, state jewish school, synagogue and two prayer houses.
In 1914 World War I began. Vishneva was on the line of German military fortifications. Of course, jews were among the refugees to the Eastern part of Russia.
This war was one of the sad pages of Vishneva history. The shtetl was burnt. After the war it was possible to see hear only a german cemetery and ferroconcrete fortifications.
The Brest-Litovsk treaty (1918) ended the war between Russia and Germany. After three years, according to the Riga treaty - Vishneva - a part of Polish independence state.
1921-1939 wasn`t a bad period for Vishneva industry. Also, it was a period of polonisation. A lot of poles settled here during 1921-39. Wood trade was very popular between the poles, belarussians and jews. In Vishneva was found a jewish school on yidish (separate for boys and girls).
In 30-th of 20th century in Vishneva were a lot of stores, workshops, the mill of Rudensky, two restaraunts (owners Twertneisky and Rabinovich), a big store of Yakubeni, two hotels (Podberesky and Lewin), three pubs and bread baking plants, the apotheke of Pobol, first-aid post of doctor Podzelver (one of the most popular and respected citizen of Vishneva), post and telegraph office and so on. Jews lived mostly in te central part of Vishneva, belarussian and polish population in outskirts.
In 1923 former Israeli prime-minister, laureate of Nobel Prize for Peace Shimon Peres (Persky) was born in Vishneva. His father Itzhak Persky (1896-1962) was a wood tradesman, mother Sarah (b. 1905) - the teacher of Russian language and literature. His younger brother name is Gershon .
In 1932 Itzhak Persky went to Palestine. In 1934 Persky all members of I.Persky family moved to Palestine. In 1992 the foreign minister of the state of Israel, Shimon Peres visited Vishneva and found the place of his house.
At the 1th of september Nazi Germany invaded Poland. 16 days later Soviet Army invaded Western Belarus and Ukraine. Vishneva became a soviet town, part of Belarussian Soviet republic. Private trade was prohibited. It was very bad for jewish business. The authorities closed privat stores. After this many jews worked in agriculture, many of them, built fortifications on a new Soviet-German border. Under the soviet rule jewish school continued to exist. (but no separate for boys and girls). A brass-band of fire-brigade was extreamly popular between young people.
22th of june, 4.00 am, Hitler`s army invaded Soviet Union. They occupied
Vishneva in the 27th of June. After the creation of police in Vishneva the Nazi orded jews to wear a yellow Star of David on their back. Everybody, who will help jews, who will hide jews, who will give them bread or wear will be shooted - was the german order. In the first monthes of occupation they organized ghetto in Vishneva on Kraevskaya street. 1600 Vishneva jews were put there. The conditions were awful. Germans and local traitors (for example, policeman Yurovich and komendant Pashkovsky).
Yurovich and Pashkovsky were a real monsters. They liked to tortue their victims. One day, they on hourses went to ghetto, turned out jews from their homes and began to beat them and after this shooted out.
In August, 1942 the Nazi decided to liquidate a ghetto. A ghetto were surrounded by machine-gunners. The Jews were put in empty shed (the end of Kraevskaya street) and began to shoot. This shed was poured by gazoline and burnt.
Only 12-15 Vishneva jews rescued. After the War they didn`t live in Vishnevo. 1942 - is the end of Vishneva Jewish history. In 1980 in Vishneva was created a monument with the words "soviet citizens", but no jews.
Our duty is to mention the local citizens of Vishneva who helped jews.
Today, I know the names only two of them: Tamara Ivanovna Pudakevich (b. 1921), who passed products to ghetto and Maria Ivanovna Bazyk (b. 1914) who hided jews.

Source: Leja Altshuller (Bobruisk). Vishnevo // Evrei Belarusi, Minsk, 1998




Leja Altshuller (Bobruisk). Vishnevo // Evrei Belarusi, Minsk,
-

The village of Vishnevo in the Volozhin district is famous as a birthplace of two ex prime ministers - former Prime Minister of Belarus Vyachaslau Kebich, and former Prime Minister of Israel Shimon Peres. Both of the politicians feel a strong affection toward this place.
other well known Jews who were born in Vishnevo; Nachum Goldman - A Jewish statesman who after World War II, played an indispensable role in the reparations agreement with Germany and in the development of Israel.
Yehoshua Rabinovitz The "Shomer Ha'zair" was established in 1928 by Yehoshua Rabinovitz former mayor of Tel Aviv, and former treasury minister of the Israeli government and Isaac Kaplan.
Avraham Dikenstein- head of "Ampal" and Bank Hapoalim.
The head of the Yeshiva in Vishnevo, Rabbi Ongerman,later became the head rabbi of Israel.



eilat
USA -

Many thanks for this - extremely interesting. Just two questions :-
a) there are several towns with the name Vishnevo or similar. Where is this
one?
b) do you have any idea of the vintage of these photographs?

My great grandfather and his family originated in W/Vishnevo "in the
district of Vilno" (according to his naturalisation papers) in the
1860s-80s, before coming to England around 1889. If anyone knows of any
Leboffs or similar (I don't know whether this was the exact name when they
were in eastern Europe)- parents Joseph and Judith, with children Solomon,
Sarah, Harris, Leah, Michael and Julius - I would be very pleased to hear
from them!


David leboffda@email.lul.co.uk
USA -

Wiszniew/Vishnevo was a gmina town and a miasteczko (small city) with dependencies: Bohdanow, Bombaly, Doikniewicze, Kociowszczyzna, Sakowszczyzna, Slajkowszczyzna, Yhlu, and Zardle. Wolozyn was the seat of the Justice of the Peace. The justice court was in Wilno. The 1928 population was 957. The railway was 6 km. away, trainstop for limited transports in Bohdanow, line: Lida-Molodeczno. The post office and telephone were in Wiszniew k. Bohdanowa and telegraph in Bohdanow. Traby had 1 Catholic church and 1 Orthodox church and an Association Of Merchants. Markets were Wednesdays. Traby had mills, tanneries and sawmills


Jewishgen
USA -

The All Belarus Database

1929 Polish Business Directory for Vishnevo/ Wiszniew
Town(coords) District Name / Company(registered) Street Occupation Notes
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn , W 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ABRAMOWICZ, G 

retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn AMELJANOWICZ, H 

tea dealer/tea shop/cafe Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ARAMOWICZ, dr. Stan. 

physicians

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn AREWICZ, M 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BAJKOWICZ, R 

grocer of staple items excluding bakery and dairy

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BAKIEROWSKI, J 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERENSZTEJN, Mors M 

linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERKMAN, D 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERKMAN, F 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERKOWSKI: SEE RUDENSKI,  

mill

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERMAN, H 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERMAN, M 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERNADT, A 

mill wod Fryszerki
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERNSZTEJN, Maks 
(x)
linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BERZMAN, B 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BIELINSKI, A 

wholesale salt Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BLOCH, J 

tailor

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BOHDANOW,  

wholesale produces from the colonies Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BUNIMOWICZ, R 

linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn BUTENIEW: SEE CHREPTOWICZ,  

landowner

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CHAJKLIN, J 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CHOS, J 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CHREPTOWICZ-BUTENIEW, hr. Konst. 

landowner 18540
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CWIERNEWSKI, S 
(x)
liquor

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CWIERTNIEWSKA, Br. 

midwife

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn CYLINSKI, J 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DARSZON, Ch 

dentist

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DASZKIEWICZ, F 

comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DAWIDSON, H 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DAWIDSON, J 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DORFKA, W 

clock/watchmaker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DUBIECKI, B 

blacksmith

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DUDMAN, J 

hairdresser

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DUDMAN, M 

shoes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DUDMAN, M 

office supplies

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DZIECHCLAR F, MARANY SZ AND B, F 

forestry operation

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn DZIEDZIUL, W 

comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ELIJASZEWICZ, D 

carpenter

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ELJASZKIEWICZ, I 

tailor

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GIRZON, Ch 

hairdresser

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GIRZON, M 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GITLIC, E 

baker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GURWICZ, Ch 

cheese

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GURWICZ, E 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GURWICZ, R 
(x)
retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GURWICZ, Sz 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn GURWICZ, W 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn HEJMAN, M 

baker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn HORDYNIEC, J 

joiner/carpenter

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn HORDYNIEC, Sz 

barber-surgeon/feldsher Uhly
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn IWANCZ, A 

pork butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JAKOWIEW, A 

wheelwright Bulkalowo
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JAKOWIEW, P 

wheelwright Bulkalowo
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JANKOWSKI, A 

wins and brandy

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JANKOWSKI, J 

blacksmith

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JAWIDOWICZ, S 

comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JEDWABNIK, F 

linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JEWELOWSKI,  

sawmill

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JOSEL, M 

baker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JURGILEWICZ, J 

barrel maker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn JURGILEWICZ, J 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAGAN, A 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KALMANOWICZ, Ch 

hairdresser

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAMIONKA,  

leather and skins

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPELOWICZ, M 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, E 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, L 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, M 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, R 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, S 

tannery

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KAPLAN, Sz 

sewing machines

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KASA SPOLDZIELCZA,  
(x)
savings and loan bank

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KOLENDO, J 

tannery Bombaly
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KOLENDO, T 

mason

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KOPELOWICZ, M 
(x)
fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KOPELOWICZ, W 
(x)
oil products

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KOTLER, F 

shoes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KREMER, E 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KRYCZYNSKA, Lubomila 

landowner Lostaja 110
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KRYCZYNSKI, anat. 

landowner Pawilwowo 110
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn KWIATKOWSKI, J 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEBKOWSKI, M 
(x)
liquor

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEJZEROWSKI, sz 

wholesale beer Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWICKI, A 

locksmith

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, H 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, L 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, L 
(x)
inn

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, M 

wheelwright Klimy
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, S 

grain/seed

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LEWIN, Sz 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LIBERMAN, E 

baker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LICHTERMAN, I 

photography

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LIWSZYC, M 

comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn LUBIANSKI, J 

iron

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MAGIT, B 
(x)
fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MARANY: SEE DZIECHCLAR,  

forestry operation

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MELCER, Ch 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MELCER, S 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MELZER, K 

felt factory

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MILIKOWSKI, B 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MILIKOWSKI, Sz 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn MINC, Sz 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn NAGROBECKI, S and E 

comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn NASIELSKI, I 

baker

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn NOCHIMOWSKA, F 

hardware

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn OLEWINSKI, S 

shoes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PIETRAK, M 

cement products

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PITLIC, M 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn POBOL, B 
(x)
pharmacy

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBERESKA, D 

retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBERESKA, P 

inn

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBERESKA, R 

ready-made clothes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBERESKI, I 

blacksmith

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBEREZKA, Ch 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBEREZKA, N 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODBIERSKI, M 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PODZELWER, dr. Girszon 

physicians

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn POTARZNIK, A 

fabric Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PRACA, STOW. SPOZ.,  
(x)
cooperative

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn PYSKLO, J 

barber-surgeon/feldsher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, B 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, J 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, J 

retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, M 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, S 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RABINOWICZ, S 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RAPOPORT, M 

pitch factory Slajkowszczyzna
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RODZIEWICZ, B 
(x)
tobacco

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ROZENTAL, H 

tea dealer/tea shop/cafe

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUBIN, B 

linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUBIN, B 

shoes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUBIN, M 

iron

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUBIN, S 

retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUDENSKI AND BERKOWSKI, J, L 

mill mot
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUDEWSKI, Lew 

commander of volunteer fire dept

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUDNIK, J 
(x)
retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUDNIK, Sz 

variety store/sundries

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUSOWICZ, W 

mill Kociowszczyzna Slajkowszczyzna
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUSZCZYC, F 

mill Dolkniewicze
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn RUSZCZYC, Regina 

landowner 250
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SADOWSKA, J 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SANANOWICZ, Jan 

veterinary aide

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SKLEPOWICZ, J 

comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SORSER, M 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SPOLDZIELNIA OSADNIKOW WOJSKOWYCH,  
(x)
cooperative

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn STOLER, N 

butcher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZAJBEL, M 

book binder

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZANIAWSKI, Marjan 

landowner 264
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZAPIRO, R 

drygoods/notions

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZCZEDREWSLO, A 

brickworks Karlinowo
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZWARC, M 

cobbler/shoe repair

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZYMSZELEWICZ, M 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZYMULEWICZ, J 

barber-surgeon/feldsher

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZYRO, I 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn SZYSZKO, N 

cheese

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn TOMKIEWICZ, S 

comestibles Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn TRABSKA, F 

fabric

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn TWO ZAKLADOW ZYRARDOWSKICH,  
(x)
linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WALKOWICZ, J 

photography

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WEJSZENARES, M 

ready-made clothes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WILENSKI, S 

fabric Bukatowo
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WISNIEWO S.A.,  
(x)
wood industry Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WISNIEWO S.A.,  
(x)
sawmill Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn WISNIEWSKI, A 

comestibles Zardele
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZAJC, K 

wheelwright

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZEBRPWSLO, W 

wholesale salt Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZEGALSKA, M 

wool combs Bohdanow
Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Ch 

cheese

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Ch 

iron

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, F 

ready-made clothes

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, G 

retail brewery + bar

Wiszniew 
1929 Polish Business Directory






Wolozyn ZUSMAN, G 

comestibles

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, S 
(x)
hardware

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZUSMAN, Sz 

linen/flax

Wiszniew 
Wolozyn ZWIAZEK SPOLDZ. STOW. SPOZ.,  
(x)
cooperative Bohdanow
Ellen Sadove Renck
USA -

reseaechers for Vishnevo who posted in Jewishgen:
Berkman Vishnevo Belarus
Davidson Vishnevo Belarus
Delatitsky Vishnevo Belarus LRROBBINS@aol.com}
Eliaskovich Vishnevo Belarus
Lubchansky Vishnevo Belarus
Rabinovich Vishnevo Belarus 21 Sep 1997
Zussman Vishnevo Belarus 22 Nov 1997
Heyman Vishnevo Belarus 23 Jul 2000 Harold J. Heyman (#31445)
3647 Indian Wells Lane
Northbrook, IL
60062
847-564-1048
hjkane@aol.com
Podbresky Vishnevo Belarus 24 Aug 1999 Lee Podair (#32290)
LPodair@HahnHessen.com
Zigman Vishnevo Belarus 24 Aug 1999
Podberesky Vishnevo Belarus 12 Jun 2000 Samuel Podberesky (#44914)
sampod@erols.net
Berkman Vishnevo Belarus 12 Jun 2000
Rabinovitz Vishnevo Belarus 12 Jun 2000
Milikowsky Vishnevo Belarus 12 Jun 2000
Leboff Vishnevo Belarus 3 Nov 2000 David Leboff (#50357)
leboffda@email.lul.co.uk


jewishgen.org/Belarus/Shtetls/Belarus
USA -

Thank you for the photos. My question is, is this Wisniowa, which was located just south of Wieliczka (south of Krakow ? I believe there may be another city with a similar name, but further away).

My relatives were Jeret family, which later, I believe, moved to Chrzanow, north west of Krakow?

In any event, your contribution to remembrance of the old stetls is welcome. If anyone knows about the Jeret family of Wisniowa (whatever the spelling in yiddish), or of Chrzanow, it would be welcome.

Thank you very much,


loewy floewy@aol.com
USA -

Thank you for this information. We have added links - at - http://jewishhistory.huji.ac.il/Internetresources/jewish_communities_in_europe.htm#BELARUS
could you please add a link to our site on yours?

Please forward us and other links you may have found that we have missed!

Shalom,

Nachum Applbaum
jewishhistory.huji
USA -

For those who may be interested in either Disna or Vileika Uyezds, the
following book is available at Harvard U.

"Materialy po istorii i geografii Disnenskago i Vileiskago uiezdov Vilenskoi
gubernii"

loosely translated as "Material on the history and geography of Disna and, Vileika Uyezds - Vilna Gubernia"

The author was A. [Aleksei] Sapunov. The book was published in Vitebsk in 1896. Worldcat lists Harvard U. as the only institution holding the book
however, try your local inter-library loan librarian. there may be other
institutions holding this book.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group

---
To post to the Belarus SIG discussion group, send your message to:


Belarus SIG Webpage:
Belarus Online Newsletter:



Joel Ratner
USA -


Rogovins who died in New Haven
ROGOVIN, WILLIAM I March 21, 1951 North Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
ROGOVIN, LOUIS April 17, 1955 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
ROGOVIN, HARRY March 08, 1967 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut View
ROGOVIN, LOUIS February 11, 1969 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
SULMAN, IDA nee Rogovin March 05, 1982 New London, , Connecticut
ROGOVIN, HELEN February 15, 1988 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
BROWN, JAMES T December 02, 1991 Norwich, New London, Connecticut View
ROGOVIN, ETTA May 25, 1996 Branford, New Haven, Connecticut
ROSENSTREICH, LENA nee rogovin September 04, 1996 New Britain, Hartford, Connecticut V



Eilat
USA -

We have added your sites to http://www.haruth.com/JewBelarus.htmlhtml


HarryLeichter
USA -

We were amazed to learn about your connection to Rogovin & Vishnive through the Gurevich family.
Please keep us informed, and let us know If we can help with any information or anything else.
We appreciate your efforts in building the memorial.
Best regards,



Zvi & Judy
Thanks very much for your email.

My great-grandfather was Shevach Elliskevich who was married to Chana Simma Levine, and they were from Vishneveh. They did not emigrate and presumably died in Vishneveh, but their children all emigrated to the U.S.

Jacob
Abraham
Samuel
Rose (not sure about this?)
Morris
Mary
Philip
Joseph, born 1885
David (my grandfather) born 1887

Bob Hallock Bob1832@aol.com
USA -

Dear fellow Vishnevite (and probable distant cousin) : Thank you for your interest in Vishnevo and the pictures you have posted on your site.
Searching: Heyman, Zusman from VISHNEVO and VOLOZHIN
Harold J. Heyman
Northbrook, IL
Harold J. Heyman hjkane@aol.com
USA -

Thank you so much for the wonderful web page. My head is spinning. This is all I know:

My grandmother's birth certificate, NY, 7/28/87, has her listed as Frances Klein with the words Rachel Clioen crossed out. Her father is Samuel Clioen (crossed out) Klein and her mother is Finnor Clioen (crossed out) Rachel Klein. Her mother's maiden name is listed as Finnor Radowich. The birthplace of both parents is listed as Russia.

I know that their synagogue made up of landsman was named for the town they came from - Wolozin. I always assumed I should be looking under Radowich for genealogy clues but then shortly before she died, my grandmother told my cousin (in a taped interview) that the spelling of her mother's maiden name was "Rogovin."

If you know of anyone who has put a family tree on the Internet, and the link to such a site, I would be very grateful for the information. Thank you.

Lauri

Lauri Mamalau@aol.com
USA -

Shalom!
My relatives are from the Gurevitz family
Eilat Gordin Levitan
USA: